I am playing around codefight, but I am really stuck to the following efficient issue.

Problem:
Given integers n, l and r, find the number of ways to represent n as a sum of two integers A and B such that l ≤ A ≤ B ≤ r.

Example:
For n = 6, l = 2 and r = 4, the output should be countSumOfTwoRepresentations2(n, l, r) = 2. There are just two ways to write 6 as A + B, where 2 ≤ A ≤ B ≤ 4: 6 = 2 + 4 and 6 = 3 + 3.

Here is my code. It passes all the unit tests but it failing in the hidden ones. Can someone direct me somehow? Thanks in advance.

public static int countSumOfTwoRepresentations2(int n, int l, int r) {
    int nrOfWays = 0;
    for(int i=l;i<=r;i++)
    {
        for(int j=i;j<=r;j++)
        {
            if(i+j==n)
                nrOfWays++;
        }
    }
    return nrOfWays;

}
  • What are the 'hidden ones'? – Shadov Oct 4 '16 at 19:17
up vote 5 down vote accepted

Well, there's no need to make so huge calculations... It's easy to calculate:

public static int count(int n, int l, int r) {
    if (l > n/2)
        return 0;
    return Math.min(n/2 - l, r - n/2) + ((n%2 == 1) ? 0 : 1);
}

Passes all my tests so far. For positives and negatives as well.

  • How did you got to this formula? Could you explain? – Rafael Miceli Feb 4 '17 at 13:21
  • 1
    @RafaelMiceli Basically these sums are: n/2 - 1 + n/2 + 1, n/2 - 3 + n/2 + 3 ... as long as we hit l or r. Then if n isn't even we skip n/2 + n/2 – xenteros Feb 4 '17 at 19:38
  • This doesn't work for the case where n=25, l=10, r=20. The correct answer is 3: (12,13),(11,14),(10,15). But this code returns 2. – zambro Jul 14 '17 at 23:52

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