i've been instructed to create a function that takes values from an array and squares each value, and logging the numbers to the console. i've attempted two methods, neither of which work so far:

first attempt:

var numbers = [2, 7, 13, 24];

function squareAll(numbers) {
  var newArray = [];
  for(i = 0; i < numbers.length; i++) {
    numbers = newArray.push(Math.pow(numbers[i], 2))
    return newArray;
  }
  console.log(squareAll(numbers));
}

second attempt:

var numbers = [2, 7, 9, 25];
var newArray = [];
var squareAll = function(numbers) {
  for(var i = 0; i < numbers.length; i++){
    newArray = [];
    newArray.push(squareAll[i] * squareAll[i])
  };
  return newArray;
};
console.log(squareAll(newArray));

when i try both codes in the javascript console, both return undefined and won't give me a specific error so i'm unsure what's wrong here. any explanation would be appreciated!

  • The functions certainly don't return undefined, since the value of newArray (which is returned by the functions) is not undefined. However, the simplest solution is numbers.map(x => x * x). – Felix Kling Oct 4 '16 at 21:52
  • 1
    Wouldn't you want to return after the loop, not inside it? – adeneo Oct 4 '16 at 21:53
  • First attempt: You're returning before you finish processing the array. Why are you assigning numbers to newArray.push(...)? push adds items to an array, no need to use the return value here. Finally, you're calling squareAll inside of squareAll. That's going to run forever. – Mike Cluck Oct 4 '16 at 21:54
  • [2, 7, 9, 25].map(a=>console.log(a**2)) – dandavis Oct 4 '16 at 21:56
  • Second attempt so close. Send numbers the the squareAll function in the last line instead of the empty array... And newArray.push(numbers[i] * numbers[i]) ... Err actually maybe you were closer on the first attempt. – Phil Oct 4 '16 at 22:07
up vote 2 down vote accepted

In your first attempt you are assigning a push method into a variable, which is a bad practice. Secondly, you are returning the function just right after the first cycle of the loop, so you are stopping the loop before going through all the elements of the array.

And in the second attempt, you are basically clearing the array after each cycle of the loop, because of the newArray = []; inside the loop. So with every cycle, you are dropping an element inside the newArray and then you are telling the loop to clear the newArray. The loop will become infinite, because the length of the newArray will never reach the numbers.length.

var numbers = [2, 7, 13, 24];
var newArray = [];

console.log(numbers.map(v => Math.pow(v, 2)));

Or:

var numbers = [2, 7, 13, 24];
var newArray = [];

for (var i = 0; i < numbers.length; i++) {
  newArray.push(Math.pow(numbers[i], 2));
}

console.log(newArray);

  • 1
    Could you please edit your answer and explain how your code works? froggyguts appears to be new to programming and I'm sure they, and any future wanderers, would benefit from an explanation. – Mike Cluck Oct 4 '16 at 21:58
  • 1
    Yes, Sir. Will add it now. – kind user Oct 4 '16 at 21:59
  • much appreciated! i am pretty new :) why is it though that assigning a push method to a variable is bad practice? – froggyguts Oct 4 '16 at 22:07
  • With using a code numbers = newArray.push(Math.pow(numbers[i], 2)) you are basically replacing the value of the numbers variable with one element with every cycle of the loop. The numbers.length will become 1 and the loop will break. – kind user Oct 4 '16 at 22:17
  • @froggyguts, It's not bad, but in your case it's wrong because it does not return what you probably think it does. check the reference edit: K. Daniel, you might also want to check the reference. But you're right, the code will fail; not throw, but fail. – Thomas Oct 4 '16 at 22:22

Why not just use map

var result = [1,2,3,4,5].map(function(val){
  return Math.pow(val,2);
});

console.log(result); // [1, 4, 9, 16, 25]

Use array.map() to set a callback function to be executed for each element in the array:

var arr1 = [1,2,3,4];

function squareIt(arr) {
  return arr.map(function (x) {
    return Math.pow(x, 2);
  });
}

alert(squareIt(arr1));

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