<div id="owner">
  <!-- ...other parent elements -->
    <div class="parent one">                <!-- parent lvl 1 -->
      <div class="child one">               <!-- child lvl 1 -->
        <!-- ...other parent elements -->
          <div class="parent two">            <!-- parent lvl 2 -->
            <div class="child two"></div>     <!-- child lvl 2 -->
            <div class="child two"></div>
            <div class="child two"></div>
          </div>
      </div>
      <div class="child one"></div> 
      <div class="child one"></div> 
      <div class="child one"></div> 
    </div>
</div>

var el = document.getElementById("owner");
el && el.querySelectorAll('.parent .child');

Important: class name "one" and "two" is only for visual purposes - it does not exist.

In result we will get 7 times div.child nodes. How to create selector that only selects children from the "first lvl" (we end up with 4 x div.child.one).

Important: this is simple example but in real on we do not know how deep div.parent.one is in div#owner and the same applies to div.parent.two

Maybe it is possible with ExtJS ?

var el = Ext.get('#owner');
el.down('.parent .child');     //does not work, returns all elements as above

JSFiddle

  • What is expected result? Are you trying to select only first .child parent element that is child of #owner .parent? – guest271314 Oct 5 '16 at 6:13
  • Expected result is in comments: 4 x div.child.one (four divs children of div.parent.one) – kkris1983 Oct 5 '16 at 9:32
  • Do you mean without including the children, that is <div class="parent two"> <!-- parent lvl 2 --> <div class="child two"></div> <!-- child lvl 2 --> <div class="child two"></div> <div class="child two"></div> </div> within resulting collection? – guest271314 Oct 5 '16 at 23:20
  • Can you include expected html result returned by selection at Question? – guest271314 Oct 5 '16 at 23:33

You can use this:

#owner > .parent  > .child

With the > you can specify the direct children from the parent element.

  • I wrote important note: we do not know how deep div.parent.one is in #owner – kkris1983 Oct 5 '16 at 9:30
  • You can only select it with a specific css selector. Ex: #owner div div div > .parent > .child – Alec von Barnekow Oct 5 '16 at 9:32
  • so it is not possible without specifying direct children modifier ? – kkris1983 Oct 5 '16 at 9:41
  • 1
    No, it is not possible. The only alternative is to select all children. But that not what you want. – Alec von Barnekow Oct 5 '16 at 10:19
  • @kkris1983 If this or any answer has solved your question please consider accepting it by clicking the check-mark. This indicates to the wider community that you've found a solution and gives some reputation to both the answerer and yourself. There is no obligation to do this. – Alec von Barnekow Oct 5 '16 at 19:45

Try this. you used outerdiv name also parent change the outer div name

var el = document.getElementById("owner");

parent = document.querySelector('.parents');
children = parent.children;
console.info(children);
<script src="https://ajax.googleapis.com/ajax/libs/jquery/2.1.1/jquery.min.js"></script>
<div id="owner">
  <div class="parents one">                <!-- parent lvl 1 -->
    <div class="child one">               <!-- child lvl 1 -->
      <div class="parent two">            <!-- parent lvl 2 -->
        <div class="child two"></div>     <!-- child lvl 2 -->
        <div class="child two"></div>
        <div class="child two"></div>
      </div>
    </div>
    <div class="child one"></div> 
    <div class="child one"></div> 
    <div class="child one"></div> 
  </div>
</div>

  • without using jquery – kkris1983 Oct 5 '16 at 9:34
  • @kkris1983 YES in above code didn't use jquery. only using javascript. – Dhaarani Oct 5 '16 at 9:35
  • still result expected is <div class="child one"> <div class="child one"> <div class="child one"> <div class="child one"> and not the one provided with your code – kkris1983 Oct 5 '16 at 9:36
  • you need to print child two only correct – Dhaarani Oct 5 '16 at 9:37
  • @kkris1983 now check my answer. I will change my answer for your expectation. – Dhaarani Oct 5 '16 at 9:57

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