102

When I try SQLAlchemy Relation Example following this guide: Basic Relationship Patterns

I have this code

#!/usr/bin/env python
# encoding: utf-8
from sqlalchemy import create_engine
from sqlalchemy import Table, Column, Integer, ForeignKey
from sqlalchemy.orm import relationship, sessionmaker
from sqlalchemy.ext.declarative import declarative_base

engine = create_engine('sqlite:///:memory:', echo=True)
Session = sessionmaker(bind=engine)
session = Session()
Base = declarative_base(bind=engine)

class Parent(Base):
    __tablename__ = 'parent'
    id = Column(Integer, primary_key=True)
    children = relationship("Child")

class Child(Base):
    __tablename__ = 'child'
    id = Column(Integer, primary_key=True)
    parent_id = Column(Integer, ForeignKey('parent.id'))
    parent = relationship("Parent")

Base.metadata.create_all()

p = Parent()
session.add(p)
session.commit()
c = Child(parent_id=p.id)
session.add(c)
session.commit()
print "children: {}".format(p.children[0].id)
print "parent: {}".format(c.parent.id)

It works well, but in the guide, it says the model should be:

class Parent(Base):
    __tablename__ = 'parent'
    id = Column(Integer, primary_key=True)
    **children = relationship("Child", back_populates="parent")**

class Child(Base):
    __tablename__ = 'child'
    id = Column(Integer, primary_key=True)
    parent_id = Column(Integer, ForeignKey('parent.id'))
    **parent = relationship("Parent", back_populates="children")**

Why don't I need back_populates or backref in my example? When should I use one or the other?

188

If you use backref you don't need to declare the relationship on the second table.

class Parent(Base):
    __tablename__ = 'parent'
    id = Column(Integer, primary_key=True)
    children = relationship("Child", backref="parent")

class Child(Base):
    __tablename__ = 'child'
    id = Column(Integer, primary_key=True)
    parent_id = Column(Integer, ForeignKey('parent.id'))

If you're not using backref, and defining the relationship's separately, then if you don't use back_populates, sqlalchemy won't know to connect the relationships, so that modifying one also modifies the other.

So, in your example, where you've defined the relationship's separately, but didn't provide a back_populates argument, modifying one field wouldn't automatically update the other in your transaction.

>>> parent = Parent()
>>> child = Child()
>>> child.parent = parent
>>> print(parent.children)
[]

See how it didn't automatically fill out the children field?

Now, if you supply a back_populates argument, sqlalchemy will connect the fields.

class Parent(Base):
    __tablename__ = 'parent'
    id = Column(Integer, primary_key=True)
    children = relationship("Child", back_populates="parent")

class Child(Base):
    __tablename__ = 'child'
    id = Column(Integer, primary_key=True)
    parent_id = Column(Integer, ForeignKey('parent.id'))
    parent = relationship("Parent", back_populates="children")

So now we get

>>> parent = Parent()
>>> child = Child()
>>> child.parent = parent
>>> print(parent.children)
[Child(...)]

Sqlalchemy knows these two fields are related now, and will update each as the other is updated. It's worth noting that using backref will do this, too. Using back_populates is nice if you want to define the relationships on every class, so it's easy to see all the fields just be glancing at the model class, instead of having to look at other classes that define fields via backref.

5
  • 73
    A note about back_populates vs backref: backref is more succinct because you don't need to declare the relation on both classes, but in practice I find it not worth to save this on line. I think back_populates is better, not only because in python culture "Explicit is better than implicit" (Zen of Python), but when you have many models, with a quick glance at its declaration you can see all relationships and their names instead of going over all related models. Also, a nice side benefit of back_populates is that you get auto-complete on both directions on most IDEs =)
    – Fabiano
    Aug 8 '19 at 8:06
  • backref may seem easier to implement (especially If you clearly indicate the relationship in both classes using comments, at least I thought so...), until you need to implement multiple relationships to a single table and work with containers. In the end back_populates makes your code easier to understand
    – Rhdr
    Jul 23 '20 at 11:03
  • is the parent_id really necessary under Child? And what about helper tables, as indicated in the documentation Sep 13 '20 at 13:45
  • 2
    @LuizTauffer The parent_id is the actual foreign key field that stores the parent-child relationship. It is necessary. Helper tables are for defining many-to-many relationships (for example, if a Child could have more than one Parent). The fkey example above is the classical one-to-manay example where each Child has one and only one Parent, and a parent can have many Children. Sep 14 '20 at 4:15
  • if you need to retrieve information from one side only, you can add back_populates only on the given side. Example you can have back_populates on the children which will provide info about the parent, and leave the parent class not 'back_populated' with children references
    – natbusa
    Jun 16 at 3:46

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.