35

If I want to unpack a tuple and pass it as arguments is there a way to do this:

//Does not compile
fn main() {
    let tuple = (10, Vec::new());
    foo(tuple);
}
fn foo(a: i32, b: Vec<i32>) {
    //Does stuff.
}

Instead of having to do this:

fn main() {
    let tuple = (10, Vec::new());
    foo(tuple.0, tuple.1);
}
fn foo(a: i32, b: Vec<i32>) {
    //Does stuff.
}
17

On a nightly compiler:

#![feature(fn_traits)]

fn main() {
    let tuple = (10, Vec::new());
    std::ops::Fn::call(&foo, tuple);
}
fn foo(a: i32, b: Vec<i32>) {
}

There is AFAIK no stable way to do that.

3
  • 1
    But there is, see my answer. – ljedrz Oct 5 '16 at 17:00
  • 6
    @ljedrz I assumed he did not want/could not change the function signature. – mcarton Oct 5 '16 at 17:06
  • In that case yes, I wouldn't see any other way either. – ljedrz Oct 5 '16 at 17:09
12

There is a way, using the magic of pattern matching:

fn main() {
    let tuple = (10, Vec::new());
    foo(tuple);
}

fn foo((a, b): (i32, Vec<i32>)) {
    // do stuff
}

As per Rust reference:

As with let bindings, function arguments are irrefutable patterns, so any pattern that is valid in a let binding is also valid as an argument.

So you can specify an argument like:

(a, b): (i32, Vec<i32>)

just like you would in a let statement.

1
  • 4
    can you elaborate about this a little bit more? Isn't it then like a calling a function with a single argument which happened to be a tuple? – piotao Jul 23 '20 at 22:28
5
let (a, b) = (10, Vec::new());
foo(a, b);
1
  • 5
    I upvoted, but this answer would be better if it explicitly answered the question rather than just offering alternative code. – trentcl Oct 5 '16 at 15:57

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