6

All I want to do is update a field with the DIRECT CURRENT SYMBOL FORM TWO character into my SQL Server 2012 database. Is that too much to ask? Apparently it is.

The answer to this question and this question is the same and did not work for me.

My update script

UPDATE Table 
SET Value = N'SUPPLY 9-30Vdc 0.2W ⎓' 
WHERE id = '1234'

Aaaaand the relevant table schema:

CREATE TABLE [dbo].[Table]
(
    ...
    ... 
    [Value] [nvarchar] (1000) COLLATE SQL_Latin1_General_CP1_CI_AS NOT NULL,
    ...
    ...
) ON [PRIMARY] TEXTIMAGE_ON [PRIMARY]

Want more? Here's the results of sp_columns:

enter image description here

Yes, I prefixed the string with N''. That should work, right? Nope.

Screenshot:

enter image description here

Notice the little box where the unicode character should be. Why, though?

12
  • Is the column a unicode data type (NVarchar, NChar)?
    – Aron
    Commented Oct 5, 2016 at 19:09
  • @Aron Ah, I forgot to mention that. Yes, it is. I've updated my question.
    – LCIII
    Commented Oct 5, 2016 at 19:15
  • 1
    Can you post the entire table definition?
    – Lamak
    Commented Oct 5, 2016 at 19:26
  • 4
    Last post... according to this article, you must change your results to display as TEXT and not as grid. social.msdn.microsoft.com/Forums/sqlserver/en-US/… After doing that, I see the characters.
    – Aron
    Commented Oct 5, 2016 at 19:34
  • 1
    @Aron Ah hah! When I output as TEXT instead of Grid I finally see the correct engineering symbol as well. So would that mean that my database truly is getting updated but the issue is with SQL Server's grid output itself?
    – LCIII
    Commented Oct 5, 2016 at 19:40

4 Answers 4

7

Per the comment discussion on your question, your SQL code is correct and the unicode character is being updated, but SQL Server Management Studio cannot (for some reason) display this unicode character in the GRID resultset. If you change your result view to TEXT (control+T), you should see the unicode character.

"If you use SSMS for your queries, change to output type from "Grid" to "Text", because depending on the font the grid can't show unicode."

2
  • 2
    Nice find, the selected font would make sense.
    – Igor
    Commented Oct 5, 2016 at 19:48
  • In Visual Studio, I tried changing the font for the results grid to Consolas (Tools → Options → Fonts and Colours → "Show settings for: SQL Results - Grid" → Font). However, it still didn't support Unicode characters in spite of the code window with the same font being able to display them. If anyone knows a working font then speak-up - but based on this, it doesn't look like a font issue. Commented Sep 1, 2020 at 13:51
3

Thanks to @Aron, I was having next problem:

In SSMS, when I copy a text like Sighișoara from a grid result (table A from database A) and paste in an insert query (table B from database B), the result of this insert was Sighi?oara, with an interrogation character.

Steps that helped to me in SSMS:

  1. Tools --> Options --> Environement --> Fonts and Colors. Select in Show settings for the option Grid Results and for this option, use an unicode font.
  2. Be sure that your table has the column with nvarchar(X), not varchar(X).
  3. Be sure that, when you insert data, you have N character before string, like this:

    insert into table(a,b,c,d,e,f) values ('Rumania',N'Sighișoara',GETDATE(),0,0,'Test')

(For SSMS 17.9.1)

0

You can try:

UPDATE Table SET Value = 'N' + char(39) + 'SUPPLY 9-30Vdc 0.2W ⎓' WHERE id = '1234'

Maybe:

SET QUOTED_IDENTIFIER OFF;

UPDATE Table SET Value = REPLACE(Value, "N'SUPPLY ", "SUPPLY") WHERE id = '1234'

SET QUOTED_IDENTIFIER ON;

I hope this helps...

Good Luck!

-1

There is no column called "value". Does this work?

UPDATE Table SET COLUMN_NAME = N'SUPPLY 9-30Vdc 0.2W ⎓' WHERE id = '1234'
1
  • It works per Aron's comment in the original question
    – LCIII
    Commented Oct 5, 2016 at 19:41

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