635

Is there a way to do the following using LINQ?

foreach (var c in collection)
{
    c.PropertyToSet = value;
}

To clarify, I want to iterate through each object in a collection and then update a property on each object.

My use case is I have a bunch of comments on a blog post, and I want to iterate through each comment on a blog post and set the datetime on the blog post to be +10 hours. I could do it in SQL, but I want to keep it in the business layer.

8
  • 18
    Interesting question. Personally I prefer how you've got it above - far clearer what's going on!
    – noelicus
    Commented Apr 25, 2016 at 18:12
  • 13
    I came here looking for an answer to the same question, and decided that it was just as easy, less code, and easier to understand for future developers to just do it the way you did in you OP. Commented Feb 2, 2017 at 17:31
  • 4
    Why would you want to do it in LINQ?
    – Caltor
    Commented Aug 17, 2017 at 14:07
  • 18
    This question asks for the wrong thing, the only correct answer is: don't use LINQ to modify the datasource Commented Nov 16, 2017 at 10:39
  • 5
    Wow, so many massively upvoted answers here that are just awful ways to do this. Just stick with a foreach loop, it's much more readable and has no weird side effects.
    – DavidG
    Commented Jul 13, 2021 at 16:39

18 Answers 18

995

While you can use a ForEach extension method, if you want to use just the framework you can do

collection.Select(c => {c.PropertyToSet = value; return c;}).ToList();

The ToList is needed in order to evaluate the select immediately due to lazy evaluation.

35
  • 11
    If collection was an ObservableCollection say, then changing items in place rather than creating a new list can be useful. Commented Mar 5, 2010 at 22:44
  • 10
    @desaivv yeah this is a bit of a syntax abuse, so Resharper is warning you about this. Commented Apr 25, 2012 at 7:07
  • 65
    IMHO, this is far less expressive than a simple foreach loop. The ToList() is confusing because it is not used for anything but forcing evaluation that would otherwise be deferred. The projection is also confusing because it's not used for its intended purpose; rather, it's used to iterate over the elements of the collection and allow access to a property so that it can be updated. The only question in my mind would be whether or not the foreach loop could benefit from parallelism using Parallel.ForEach, but that's a different question.
    – Philippe
    Commented Feb 10, 2014 at 14:25
  • 133
    This answer is a worst practice. Never do this. Commented May 2, 2019 at 17:09
  • 19
    See all the other comments for reasons why this is a bad idea. You should never use a select to execute a side effect. The purpose of a select is to select a value, not to emulate a for each loop. Commented Nov 5, 2019 at 15:39
463
collection.ToList().ForEach(c => c.PropertyToSet = value);
11
  • 52
    @SanthoshKumar: Use collection.ToList().ForEach(c => { c.Property1ToSet = value1; c.Property2ToSet = value2; }); Commented Jul 28, 2013 at 6:45
  • 12
    This has the advantage over Cameron MacFarland's answer of updating the list in place, rather than creating a new list.
    – Simon Elms
    Commented Jun 24, 2016 at 10:16
  • 14
    Wow, this answer is really not useful. Creating a new collection just to be able to use a loop Commented Nov 16, 2017 at 10:35
  • 3
    this answer is simply incorrect: it does not actually change the original collection, it just creates a new one that you still need to assign somewhere
    – Allie
    Commented Jun 28, 2021 at 9:46
  • 4
    @Allie: Your criticism is correct, but this is only an issue if the elements in the collection are value types (i.e., structs). If c is a reference type, then setting PropertyToSet in this manner behaves as intended. See pastebin.com/rtG2i1KX
    – Brian
    Commented Jul 1, 2021 at 16:28
85

I am doing this

Collection.All(c => { c.needsChange = value; return true; });
9
  • I think this is the cleanest way to do it.
    – wcm
    Commented Oct 9, 2013 at 15:08
  • 41
    This approach certainly works but it violates the intent of the All() extension method, leading to potential confusion when someone else reads the code.
    – Tom Baxter
    Commented Oct 29, 2015 at 16:29
  • This approach is better .Using All instead of using each loop
    – UJS
    Commented Nov 6, 2017 at 5:07
  • 2
    Definitely prefer this over calling ToList() unnecessarily, even if it's a little misleading about what it's using All() for.
    – iupchris10
    Commented Dec 20, 2017 at 22:24
  • 1
    If you're using a collection like List<> that has it theForEach() method is a much less cryptic way to accomplish this. ex ForEach(c => { c.needsChange = value; }) Commented Dec 5, 2019 at 21:27
31

I actually found an extension method that will do what I want nicely

public static IEnumerable<T> ForEach<T>(
    this IEnumerable<T> source,
    Action<T> act)
{
    foreach (T element in source) act(element);
    return source;
}
8
  • 4
    nice :) Lomaxx, maybe add an example so peeps can see it in 'action' (boom tish!).
    – Pure.Krome
    Commented Apr 10, 2009 at 10:51
  • 2
    This is the only useful approach if you really want to avoid a foreach-loop (for whatever reason). Commented Nov 17, 2017 at 8:46
  • @Rango which you are still NOT avoiding foreach as the code itself contains the foreach loop
    – GoldBishop
    Commented Nov 27, 2018 at 21:11
  • 1
    The link is broken, it is now available at: codewrecks.com/blog/index.php/2008/08/13/… . There's also a blog comment that links to stackoverflow.com/questions/200574 . In turn, the top question comment links to blogs.msdn.microsoft.com/ericlippert/2009/05/18/… . Perhaps the answer would be simpler re-written using the MSDN (you could still credit the first link if you wanted). Sidenote: Rust has similar features, and eventually gave in and added the equivalent function: stackoverflow.com/a/50224248/799204
    – sourcejedi
    Commented Nov 20, 2019 at 12:11
  • 1
    The MSDN blog sourcejedi linked to, at blogs.msdn.microsoft.com/ericlippert/2009/05/18/…, has a good explanation of why the author thought it was a bad idea to create such an extension method. The author's most convincing reason, to me, is that using such an extension method doesn't really save many keystrokes compared to a plain foreach loop. Loop: foreach(Foo foo in foos){ statement involving foo; } Extension method: foos.ForEach((Foo foo)=>{ statement involving foo; });
    – Simon Elms
    Commented Nov 24, 2019 at 0:39
26

Use:

ListOfStuff.Where(w => w.Thing == value).ToList().ForEach(f => f.OtherThing = vauleForNewOtherThing);

I am not sure if this is overusing LINQ or not, but it has worked for me when wanting to update a specific items in the list for a specific condition.

23

Although you specifically asked for a LINQ solution and this question is quite old I post a non-LINQ-solution. This is because LINQ (= language integrated query) is meant to be used for queries on collections. All LINQ-methods don’t modify the underlying collection, they just return a new one (or more precise an iterator to a new collection). Thus whatever you do e.g. with a Select doesn’t effect the underlying collection, you simply get a new one.

Of course you could do it with a ForEach (which isn't LINQ, by the way, but an extension on List<T>). But this literally uses foreach anyway, but with a lambda-expression. Apart from this every LINQ method internally iterates your collection e.g. by using foreach or for, however it simply hides it from the client. I don’t consider this any more readable nor maintainable (think of edit your code while debugging a method containing lambda-expressions).

Having said this shouldn't use LINQ to modify items in your collection. A better way is the solution you already provided in your question. With a classic loop you can easily iterate your collection and update its items. In fact all those solutions relying on List.ForEach are nothing different, but far harder to read from my perspective.

So you shouldn't use LINQ in those cases where you want to update the elements of your collection.

3
  • 4
    Off-topic: I agree, and there are sooooooo many instances of LINQ being abused, examples of people requesting "high performance LINQ chains", to do what could be accomplished with a single loop, etc. I am thankful that NOT using LINQ is too ingrained into me, and typically do not use it. I see people using LINQ chains to perform a single action, not realizing that pretty much every time a LINQ command is used you are creating another for loop "under the hood". I feel it is syntatic sugar to create less verbose ways of doing simple tasks, not to be a replacement for standard coding. Commented Jul 25, 2018 at 7:27
  • 1
    so exactly where is your answer in all of that?
    – John Lord
    Commented Sep 21, 2021 at 14:54
  • 1
    @JohnLord the answer simply is: don't use LINQ in those cases where you want to modify the collection. Commented Sep 21, 2021 at 18:03
10

There is no built-in extension method to do this. Although defining one is fairly straight forward. At the bottom of the post is a method I defined called Iterate. It can be used like so

collection.Iterate(c => { c.PropertyToSet = value;} );

Iterate Source

public static void Iterate<T>(this IEnumerable<T> enumerable, Action<T> callback)
{
    if (enumerable == null)
    {
        throw new ArgumentNullException("enumerable");
    }

    IterateHelper(enumerable, (x, i) => callback(x));
}

public static void Iterate<T>(this IEnumerable<T> enumerable, Action<T,int> callback)
{
    if (enumerable == null)
    {
        throw new ArgumentNullException("enumerable");
    }

    IterateHelper(enumerable, callback);
}

private static void IterateHelper<T>(this IEnumerable<T> enumerable, Action<T,int> callback)
{
    int count = 0;
    foreach (var cur in enumerable)
    {
        callback(cur, count);
        count++;
    }
}
6
  • Is Iterate necessary, whats wrong with Count, Sum, Avg or other existing extension method that returns a scalar value? Commented Dec 29, 2008 at 22:32
  • 2
    this is pretty close to what i want but a little.. involved. The blog post I posted has a similar implementation but with fewer lines of code.
    – lomaxx
    Commented Dec 29, 2008 at 22:57
  • 1
    The IterateHelper seems overkill. The overload that doesn't take an index ends up doing alot more extra work (convert callback to lambda which takes index, keep a count which is never used). I understand it's reuse, but it's a workaround for just using a forloop anyway so it should be efficient. Commented Dec 29, 2008 at 23:20
  • 2
    @Cameron, IterateHelper serves 2 purposes. 1) Single implementation and 2) allows for ArgumentNullException to be thrown at call time vs. use. C# iterators are delayed executed, having the helper prevents the odd behavior of an exception being thrown during iteration.
    – JaredPar
    Commented Dec 30, 2008 at 3:42
  • 2
    @JaredPar: Except you're not using an iterator. There's no yield statement. Commented Dec 30, 2008 at 7:27
7

I've tried a few variations on this, and I keep going back to this guy's solution.

http://www.hookedonlinq.com/UpdateOperator.ashx

Again, this is somebody else's solution. But I've compiled the code into a small library, and use it fairly regularly.

I'm going to paste his code here, for the off chance that his site(blog) ceases to exist at some point in the future. (There's nothing worse than seeing a post that says "Here is the exact answer you need", Click, and Dead URL.)

    public static class UpdateExtensions {

    public delegate void Func<TArg0>(TArg0 element);

    /// <summary>
    /// Executes an Update statement block on all elements in an IEnumerable<T> sequence.
    /// </summary>
    /// <typeparam name="TSource">The source element type.</typeparam>
    /// <param name="source">The source sequence.</param>
    /// <param name="update">The update statement to execute for each element.</param>
    /// <returns>The numer of records affected.</returns>
    public static int Update<TSource>(this IEnumerable<TSource> source, Func<TSource> update)
    {
        if (source == null) throw new ArgumentNullException("source");
        if (update == null) throw new ArgumentNullException("update");
        if (typeof(TSource).IsValueType)
            throw new NotSupportedException("value type elements are not supported by update.");

        int count = 0;
        foreach (TSource element in source)
        {
            update(element);
            count++;
        }
        return count;
    }
}



int count = drawingObjects
        .Where(d => d.IsSelected && d.Color == Colors.Blue)
        .Update(e => { e.Color = Color.Red; e.Selected = false; } );
4
  • 1
    You can use an Action<TSource> instead of creating the an extra delegate. That might not have been available as of the time of writing that, though.
    – Frank J
    Commented May 1, 2015 at 15:20
  • Yeah, that was old school DotNet at that point in time. Good comment Frank. Commented Mar 1, 2019 at 15:59
  • The URL is dead ! (This Domain Name Has Expired) Good thing I copied the code here ! #patOnShoulder Commented Mar 1, 2019 at 16:01
  • 1
    Checking for value type makes sense, but perhaps it would be better to use a constraint, i.e. where T: struct, to catch this at compile time.
    – vgru
    Commented Nov 21, 2019 at 8:49
6

Some people consider this is a comment, but for me is an answer, because the right way to do something wrong is not do it. So, the answer for this question is in the question itself.

DO NOT USE LINQ to modify data. Use a loop.

2
  • I agree, but this answer already said that. Commented Apr 18, 2022 at 10:52
  • @Leandro Why? Please explain
    – userSteve
    Commented Oct 12, 2023 at 15:18
5

No, LINQ doesn't support a manner of mass updating. The only shorter way would be to use a ForEach extension method - Why there is no ForEach extension method on IEnumerable?

2

You can use LINQ to convert your collection to an array and then invoke Array.ForEach():

Array.ForEach(MyCollection.ToArray(), item=>item.DoSomeStuff());

Obviously this will not work with collections of structs or inbuilt types like integers or strings.

2

I wrote some extension methods to help me out with that.

namespace System.Linq
{
    /// <summary>
    /// Class to hold extension methods to Linq.
    /// </summary>
    public static class LinqExtensions
    {
        /// <summary>
        /// Changes all elements of IEnumerable by the change function
        /// </summary>
        /// <param name="enumerable">The enumerable where you want to change stuff</param>
        /// <param name="change">The way you want to change the stuff</param>
        /// <returns>An IEnumerable with all changes applied</returns>
        public static IEnumerable<T> Change<T>(this IEnumerable<T> enumerable, Func<T, T> change  )
        {
            ArgumentCheck.IsNullorWhiteSpace(enumerable, "enumerable");
            ArgumentCheck.IsNullorWhiteSpace(change, "change");

            foreach (var item in enumerable)
            {
                yield return change(item);
            }
        }

        /// <summary>
        /// Changes all elements of IEnumerable by the change function, that fullfill the where function
        /// </summary>
        /// <param name="enumerable">The enumerable where you want to change stuff</param>
        /// <param name="change">The way you want to change the stuff</param>
        /// <param name="where">The function to check where changes should be made</param>
        /// <returns>
        /// An IEnumerable with all changes applied
        /// </returns>
        public static IEnumerable<T> ChangeWhere<T>(this IEnumerable<T> enumerable, 
                                                    Func<T, T> change,
                                                    Func<T, bool> @where)
        {
            ArgumentCheck.IsNullorWhiteSpace(enumerable, "enumerable");
            ArgumentCheck.IsNullorWhiteSpace(change, "change");
            ArgumentCheck.IsNullorWhiteSpace(@where, "where");

            foreach (var item in enumerable)
            {
                if (@where(item))
                {
                    yield return change(item);
                }
                else
                {
                    yield return item;
                }
            }
        }

        /// <summary>
        /// Changes all elements of IEnumerable by the change function that do not fullfill the except function
        /// </summary>
        /// <param name="enumerable">The enumerable where you want to change stuff</param>
        /// <param name="change">The way you want to change the stuff</param>
        /// <param name="where">The function to check where changes should not be made</param>
        /// <returns>
        /// An IEnumerable with all changes applied
        /// </returns>
        public static IEnumerable<T> ChangeExcept<T>(this IEnumerable<T> enumerable,
                                                     Func<T, T> change,
                                                     Func<T, bool> @where)
        {
            ArgumentCheck.IsNullorWhiteSpace(enumerable, "enumerable");
            ArgumentCheck.IsNullorWhiteSpace(change, "change");
            ArgumentCheck.IsNullorWhiteSpace(@where, "where");

            foreach (var item in enumerable)
            {
                if (!@where(item))
                {
                    yield return change(item);
                }
                else
                {
                    yield return item;
                }
            }
        }

        /// <summary>
        /// Update all elements of IEnumerable by the update function (only works with reference types)
        /// </summary>
        /// <param name="enumerable">The enumerable where you want to change stuff</param>
        /// <param name="update">The way you want to change the stuff</param>
        /// <returns>
        /// The same enumerable you passed in
        /// </returns>
        public static IEnumerable<T> Update<T>(this IEnumerable<T> enumerable,
                                               Action<T> update) where T : class
        {
            ArgumentCheck.IsNullorWhiteSpace(enumerable, "enumerable");
            ArgumentCheck.IsNullorWhiteSpace(update, "update");
            foreach (var item in enumerable)
            {
                update(item);
            }
            return enumerable;
        }

        /// <summary>
        /// Update all elements of IEnumerable by the update function (only works with reference types)
        /// where the where function returns true
        /// </summary>
        /// <param name="enumerable">The enumerable where you want to change stuff</param>
        /// <param name="update">The way you want to change the stuff</param>
        /// <param name="where">The function to check where updates should be made</param>
        /// <returns>
        /// The same enumerable you passed in
        /// </returns>
        public static IEnumerable<T> UpdateWhere<T>(this IEnumerable<T> enumerable,
                                               Action<T> update, Func<T, bool> where) where T : class
        {
            ArgumentCheck.IsNullorWhiteSpace(enumerable, "enumerable");
            ArgumentCheck.IsNullorWhiteSpace(update, "update");
            foreach (var item in enumerable)
            {
                if (where(item))
                {
                    update(item);
                }
            }
            return enumerable;
        }

        /// <summary>
        /// Update all elements of IEnumerable by the update function (only works with reference types)
        /// Except the elements from the where function
        /// </summary>
        /// <param name="enumerable">The enumerable where you want to change stuff</param>
        /// <param name="update">The way you want to change the stuff</param>
        /// <param name="where">The function to check where changes should not be made</param>
        /// <returns>
        /// The same enumerable you passed in
        /// </returns>
        public static IEnumerable<T> UpdateExcept<T>(this IEnumerable<T> enumerable,
                                               Action<T> update, Func<T, bool> where) where T : class
        {
            ArgumentCheck.IsNullorWhiteSpace(enumerable, "enumerable");
            ArgumentCheck.IsNullorWhiteSpace(update, "update");

            foreach (var item in enumerable)
            {
                if (!where(item))
                {
                    update(item);
                }
            }
            return enumerable;
        }
    }
}

I am using it like this:

        List<int> exampleList = new List<int>()
            {
                1, 2 , 3
            };

        //2 , 3 , 4
        var updated1 = exampleList.Change(x => x + 1);

        //10, 2, 3
        var updated2 = exampleList
            .ChangeWhere(   changeItem => changeItem * 10,          // change you want to make
                            conditionItem => conditionItem < 2);    // where you want to make the change

        //1, 0, 0
        var updated3 = exampleList
            .ChangeExcept(changeItem => 0,                          //Change elements to 0
                          conditionItem => conditionItem == 1);     //everywhere but where element is 1

For reference the argument check:

/// <summary>
/// Class for doing argument checks
/// </summary>
public static class ArgumentCheck
{


    /// <summary>
    /// Checks if a value is string or any other object if it is string
    /// it checks for nullorwhitespace otherwhise it checks for null only
    /// </summary>
    /// <typeparam name="T">Type of the item you want to check</typeparam>
    /// <param name="item">The item you want to check</param>
    /// <param name="nameOfTheArgument">Name of the argument</param>
    public static void IsNullorWhiteSpace<T>(T item, string nameOfTheArgument = "")
    {

        Type type = typeof(T);
        if (type == typeof(string) ||
            type == typeof(String))
        {
            if (string.IsNullOrWhiteSpace(item as string))
            {
                throw new ArgumentException(nameOfTheArgument + " is null or Whitespace");
            }
        }
        else
        {
            if (item == null)
            {
                throw new ArgumentException(nameOfTheArgument + " is null");
            }
        }

    }
}
1

Here is the extension method I use...

    /// <summary>
    /// Executes an Update statement block on all elements in an  IEnumerable of T
    /// sequence.
    /// </summary>
    /// <typeparam name="TSource">The source element type.</typeparam>
    /// <param name="source">The source sequence.</param>
    /// <param name="action">The action method to execute for each element.</param>
    /// <returns>The number of records affected.</returns>
    public static int Update<TSource>(this IEnumerable<TSource> source, Func<TSource> action)
    {
        if (source == null) throw new ArgumentNullException("source");
        if (action == null) throw new ArgumentNullException("action");
        if (typeof (TSource).IsValueType)
            throw new NotSupportedException("value type elements are not supported by update.");

        var count = 0;
        foreach (var element in source)
        {
            action(element);
            count++;
        }
        return count;
    }
4
  • Why "value type elements are not supported by update"?? Nothing interferes that! Commented Aug 17, 2010 at 14:13
  • That was specific to the project I was working on. I suppose it wouldn't matter in most cases. Lately I've reworked that and renamed it Run(...), removed the value type thing and changed it to return void and dropped the count code. Commented Oct 22, 2010 at 4:44
  • That´s more or less what List<T>.ForEach also does, but just for all IEnumerable. Commented Jul 25, 2018 at 7:36
  • Looking back on this now I'd say just use a foreach loop. The only benefit of using something like this is if you want to chain the methods together and return the enumerable from the function to continue the chain after executing the action. Otherwise this is just an extra method call for no benefit. Commented Sep 7, 2018 at 18:51
1

You can use Magiq, a batch operation framework for LINQ.

0

I assume you want to change values inside a query so you could write a function for it

void DoStuff()
{
    Func<string, Foo, bool> test = (y, x) => { x.Bar = y; return true; };
    List<Foo> mylist = new List<Foo>();
    var v = from x in mylist
            where test("value", x)
            select x;
}

class Foo
{
    string Bar { get; set; }
}

But not shure if this is what you mean.

1
  • This is going in sort of the right direction by would require something to enumerate v, else it'll do nothing. Commented Dec 29, 2008 at 22:35
0

My 2 pennies:-

 collection.Count(v => (v.PropertyToUpdate = newValue) == null);
1
  • 10
    I like the thinking, but it's not really clear what the code is doing
    – lomaxx
    Commented Dec 29, 2008 at 22:43
-1

Quoting Adi Lester's answer (https://stackoverflow.com/a/5755487/8917485)

I quite like this answer, but this answer has a bug. It just changes values in a new created list. It must be changed to two lines to read the real changed list.

var aList = collection.ToList();
aList.ForEach(c => c.PropertyToSet = value);
2
-4

Suppose we have data like below,

var items = new List<string>({"123", "456", "789"});
// Like 123 value get updated to 123ABC ..

and if we want to modify the list and replace the existing values of the list to modified values, then first create a new empty list, then loop through data list by invoking modifying method on each list item,

var modifiedItemsList = new List<string>();

items.ForEach(i => {
  var modifiedValue = ModifyingMethod(i);
  modifiedItemsList.Add(items.AsEnumerable().Where(w => w == i).Select(x => modifiedValue).ToList().FirstOrDefault()?.ToString()) 
});
// assign back the modified list
items = modifiedItemsList;
1
  • 2
    Why would you make something which can run in O(n) runtime execute in O(n^2) or worse? IM unaware of how specifics of linq work but i can see this is at minimum a n^2 solution for a n problem. Commented Mar 27, 2019 at 14:06

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