55

I'm migrating a project from Swift 2.2 to Swift 3, and I'm trying to get rid of old Cocoa data types when possible.

My problem is here: migrating NSDecimalNumber to Decimal.

I used to bridge NSDecimalNumber to Double both ways in Swift 2.2:

let double = 3.14
let decimalNumber = NSDecimalNumber(value: double)

let doubleFromDecimal = decimalNumber.doubleValue

Now, switching to Swift 3:

let double = 3.14
let decimal = Decimal(double)

let doubleFromDecimal = ???

decimal.doubleValue does not exist, nor Double(decimal), not even decimal as Double... The only hack I come up with is:

let doubleFromDecimal = (decimal as NSDecimalNumber).doubleValue

But that would be completely stupid to try to get rid of NSDecimalNumber, and have to use it once in a while...

Well, either I missed something obvious, and I beg your pardon for wasting your time, or there's a loophole needed to be addressed, in my opinion...

Thanks in advance for your help.

Edit : Nothing more on the subject on Swift 4.

Edit : Nothing more on the subject on Swift 5.

1
  • yep, what a bummer still in 2018... the only reason I'm hesitating whether to move to Decimal is all the math operations (including literal conversions, like myDecimal + 1) and comparisons which are much more straightforward than with NSDecimalNumber Mar 21, 2018 at 13:35

8 Answers 8

28

NSDecimalNumber and Decimal are bridged

The Swift overlay to the Foundation framework provides the Decimal structure, which bridges to the NSDecimalNumber class. The Decimal value type offers the same functionality as the NSDecimalNumber reference type, and the two can be used interchangeably in Swift code that interacts with Objective-C APIs. This behavior is similar to how Swift bridges standard string, numeric, and collection types to their corresponding Foundation classes. Apple Docs

but as with some other bridged types certain elements are missing.

To regain the functionality you could write an extension:

extension Decimal {
    var doubleValue:Double {
        return NSDecimalNumber(decimal:self).doubleValue
    }
}

// implementation
let d = Decimal(floatLiteral: 10.65)
d.doubleValue
2
  • 1
    The question is still the same, even if it is hidden by an extension. You still have to use a third type instead of having only 'Double` and Decimal...
    – Zaphod
    Feb 12, 2018 at 10:20
  • 2
    Voting for this to be the accepted answer in Swift 4. Clean, though not ideal solution, ideally the Decimal type should provide a double cast cleanly in the Swift language. Feb 18, 2019 at 8:14
25

Another solution that works in Swift 3 is to cast the Decimal to NSNumber and create the Double from that.

let someDouble = Double(someDecimal as NSNumber)

As of Swift 4.2 you need:

let someDouble = Double(truncating: someDecimal as NSNumber)
3
  • 4
    let c = Double(truncating:a as NSNumber) in Swift 4 Aug 23, 2017 at 16:29
  • @vikingosegundo That's Swift 4. In Swift 3 you don't need the truncating.
    – rmaddy
    Aug 23, 2017 at 16:31
  • 1
    Yes but you still have to cast to a third type... You can't stay with only Double and Decimal, you need either to use NSDecimalNumber or NSNumber...
    – Zaphod
    Feb 12, 2018 at 10:17
12

Solution that works in Swift 4

let double = 3.14
let decimal = Decimal(double)
let doubleFromDecimal = NSDecimalNumber(decimal: decimal).doubleValue
print(doubleFromDecimal)
5
  • Yes but you still have to cast to a third type... You can't stay with only Double and Decimal, you need either to use NSDecimalNumber or NSNumber... That's the point of this post...
    – Zaphod
    Jul 20, 2018 at 9:21
  • @Zaphod Have you checked Jul 22, 2018 at 17:26
  • 1
    Indeed it works... But you still use a third type, here String using the description property. The whole idea behind this post is the question of efficiency and clarity of the code. The point is that the type Decimal designed to replace good old NSDecimalNumber can't be used transparently without using a hack (via NSNumber, NSDecimalNumber, String, pointers, or something else...) The question is more rhetorical than about development... And the missing method, is still missing in Swift 4.
    – Zaphod
    Jul 23, 2018 at 13:20
  • 1
    Don't ever rely on the .description property of any type. That's bound to go wrong at some point.
    – alexkent
    Jun 24, 2020 at 19:05
  • Terrible answer for usage of description Oct 17, 2020 at 21:30
7

Swift 5

let doubleValue = Double(truncating: decimalValue as NSNumber)
1
  • 2
    Indeed it works... But you still use a third type, here NSNumber. The whole idea behind this post is the question of efficiency and clarity of the code. The point is that the type Decimal designed to replace good old NSDecimalNumber can't be used transparently without using a hack (via NSNumber, NSDecimalNumber, String, pointers, or something else...) The question is more rhetorical than about development... And the missing method, is still missing in Swift 5.
    – Zaphod
    Jun 18, 2019 at 7:05
3

Decimal in Swift 3 is not NSDecimalNumber. It's NSDecimal, completely different type.

You should just keep using NSDecimalNumber as you did before.

5
  • 4
    Actually, Decimal corresponds to NSDecimalNumber: The Swift overlay to the Foundation framework provides the Decimal structure, which bridges to the NSDecimalNumber class. The Decimal value type offers the same functionality as the NSDecimalNumber reference type, and the two can be used interchangeably in Swift code that interacts with Objective-C APIs developer.apple.com/reference/foundation/nsdecimalnumber
    – Alexander
    Oct 6, 2016 at 8:32
  • @AlexanderMomchliov, except it has no methods of NSDecimalNumber available, so in order to use them you still gonna need to cast Decimal to NSDecimalNumber. Source: just checked it in playground. Oct 6, 2016 at 8:45
  • 2
    Yeah, I didn't claim it did. I just said that your assumption that Decimal corresponds to NSDecimal, is wrong.
    – Alexander
    Oct 6, 2016 at 8:46
  • 1
    @AlexanderMomchliov, but it is NSDecimal, just compare Decimal in generated headers of Swift 3 with NSDecimal in Foundation C code. Just because Swift bridges Decimal variable of old Foundation code to NSDecimalNumber when imported in doesn't mean Decimal becomes NSDecimalNumber. Oct 6, 2016 at 8:50
  • 2
    Even though the documentation says that Decimal bridges to NSDecimalNumber, In my experience, it's safest to stick with NSDecimalNumber for now, and wait for the libraries to stabilize (tried converting over to Decimal, and it was messier than I expected, plus the resulting code crashed).
    – Jeff Lewis
    Jan 2, 2017 at 19:32
2

You are supposed to use as operator to cast a Swift type to its bridged underlying Objective-C type. So just use as like this.

let p = Decimal(1)
let q = (p as NSDecimalNumber).doubleValue

In Swift 4, Decimal is NSDecimalNumber. Here's citation from Apple's official documentation in Xcode 10.

Important

The Swift overlay to the Foundation framework provides the Decimal structure, which bridges to the NSDecimalNumber class. For more information about value types, see Working with Cocoa Frameworks in Using Swift with Cocoa and Objective-C (Swift 4.1).

There's no NSDecimal anymore. There was confusing NSDecimal type in Swift 3, but it seems to be a bug. No more confusion.

Note

I see the OP is not interested in Swift 4, but I added this answer because mentioning only about (outdated) Swift 3 made me confused.

5
  • What was meant here was not the underlying structure but a question of syntax. I know you have ti use the as operator to cast to a bridged type. My problem is just "what is the point to use Decimal instead of NSDecimalNumber if you still need to reference it once in a while?", for instance to get the double value... There is no way to change your code from NSDecimalNumber to Decimal transparently... That was just what I meant... And it is still the case in Swift 4 (as noted in the edit)
    – Zaphod
    Oct 8, 2018 at 14:50
  • @Zaphod The point would be "using proper value type". You should know that many of NS- classes are actually designed to be value-types, but implemented in classes due to lack of language construct in OBJC. IMO, Apple want to provide more "Swift-y" library to Swift users, but their transition to Swift is not complete yet. There're many "incomplete" parts like this in Apple libraries, and they're likely to be updated later.
    – eonil
    Oct 9, 2018 at 5:37
  • IMO, once after Apple successfully moved to Swift, they gonna remove access to OBJC part one by one.
    – eonil
    Oct 9, 2018 at 5:40
  • That was exactly my point... The transition is not completely over with Decimal...
    – Zaphod
    Oct 9, 2018 at 11:58
  • Bridging to a type isn't the same as being that type. String bridges to NSString and Dictionary to NSMutableDictionary, but they're entirely separate types. Further reading: developer.apple.com/documentation/swift/…
    – Ky.
    Oct 13, 2019 at 3:09
2

In Swift open source, the implementation is actually done in Decimal.swift, but it is private. You can re-use the code from there.

extension Double {
    @inlinable init(_ other: Decimal) {
        if other._length == 0 {
            self.init(other._isNegative == 1 ? Double.nan : 0)
            return
        }

        var d: Double = 0.0
        for idx in (0..<min(other._length, 8)).reversed() {
            var m: Double
            switch idx {
            case 0: m = Double(other._mantissa.0)
                break
            case 1: m = Double(other._mantissa.1)
                break
            case 2: m = Double(other._mantissa.2)
                break
            case 3: m = Double(other._mantissa.3)
                break
            case 4: m = Double(other._mantissa.4)
                break
            case 5: m = Double(other._mantissa.5)
                break
            case 6: m = Double(other._mantissa.6)
                break
            case 7: m = Double(other._mantissa.7)
                break
            default: break
            }
            d = d * 65536 + m
        }

        if other._exponent < 0 {
            for _ in other._exponent..<0 {
                d /= 10.0
            }
        } else {
            for _ in 0..<other._exponent {
                d *= 10.0
            }
        }
        self.init(other._isNegative != 0 ? -d : d)
    }
}
3
  • Yes indeed, but the real question remains, why doubleValue is declared as internal instead of public as it clearly should be... Maybe a pull request has to be done... But I don't know how to propose this... 🤷‍♂️
    – Zaphod
    May 25, 2020 at 9:12
  • You can create an evolution proposal on swift forums, and you'll get the feedback and reasoning behind the current implementation, and considerations regarding the proposal. May 26, 2020 at 5:34
  • Yep, I'll add that to my todo list... 😅
    – Zaphod
    May 27, 2020 at 7:43
1

For swift 5, the function is

let doubleValue = Double(truncating: decimalValue as NSNumber)

the example in the below, show the number of float.

let decimalValue: Decimal = 3.14159
let doubleValue = Double(truncating: decimalValue as NSNumber)
print(String(format: "%.3f", doubleValue))  // 3.142
print(String(format: "%.4f", doubleValue)) // 3.1416
print(String(format: "%.5f", doubleValue)) // 3.14159
print(String(format: "%.6f", doubleValue)) // 3.141590
print(String(format: "%.7f", doubleValue)) // 3.1415900
1
  • Indeed it works... But you still use a third type, here NSNumber. The whole idea behind this post is the question of efficiency and clarity of the code. The point is that the type Decimal designed to replace good old NSDecimalNumber can't be used transparently without using a hack (via NSNumber, NSDecimalNumber, String, pointers, or something else...) The question is more rhetorical than about development... And the missing method, is still missing in Swift 5.
    – Zaphod
    May 4, 2021 at 13:25

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