13

I have fairly large hash (some 10M keys) and I would like to delete some elements from it.

I usually don't like to use delete or splice, and I wind up copying what I want instead of deleting what I don't. But this time, since the hash is really large, I think I'd like to delete directly from it.

So I'm doing something like this:

foreach my $key (keys %hash) {
 if (should_be_deleted($key)) {
  delete($hash{$key});
 }
}

And it seems to work OK. But.. what if I'd like to delete some elements even before iterating on them? I'll explain by example:

foreach my $key (keys %hash) {
 if (should_be_deleted($key)) {
  delete($hash{$key});
  # if $key should be deleted, so does "$key.a", "kkk.$key" and some other keys
  # I already know to calculate. I would like to delete them now...
 }
}

I thought of some possible solutions - like checking if a key still exists as the first step in the loop or first looping and creating a list of keys to delete (without actually deleting them), then actually deleting in another loop.

What are your thought regarding this?

UPDATE

It's seems that the double-pass approach has a consensus. However, it is quite inefficient in the sense that during the first pass I double-check keys that were already marked for deletion. This is kinda recursive, because not only I check the key, I also calculate the other keys that should be deleted, although they were already calculated by the original key.

Perhaps I need to use some more dynamic data structure for iterating over the keys, that will updated dynamically?

  • "I double-check keys that were already marked for deletion" see my solution for a frugal alternative – Borodin Jul 11 '15 at 15:20
8

I recommend doing two passes because it's more robust. Hash order is effectively random, so there are no guarantees that you'll see the "primary" keys before the related ones. For example, if should_be_deleted() only detects the primary keys that aren't wanted and the related ones are calculated, you could end up processing unwanted data. A two-pass approach avoids this issue.

my @unwanted;
foreach my $key (keys %hash) {
    if (should_be_deleted($key)) {
         push @unwanted, $key;
         # push any related keys onto @unwanted
    }
}

delete @hash{@unwanted};

foreach my $key (keys %hash) {
    # do something
}
4

How about this:

my %to_delete;

foreach my $key (keys %hash) {
    if (should_be_deleted($key)) {
        $to_delete{$key}++;
    }
    # add some other keys the same way...
}

delete @hash{keys %to_delete};
2

Based on the example in the question, you could use a grep to filter out the keys that match your $key token.

Update

Your comment has clarified your need. My suggestion would be to determine the indexes that match your requirement and update you @keys set accordingly. The idea is to update @keys while looping over it so that unnecessary iterations are avoided.

I've implemented the simple grep as a customizable function here.

sub matches { $_[0] =~ /$_[1]/ ? 1 : 0 }  # Simple grep implemented here

my @keys = keys %hash;  # @keys should initially contain all keys

while ( @keys ) {

    my $key = shift @keys;
    next unless should_be_deleted ($key);  # Skip keys that are wanted

    my @indexes_to_delete = grep { matches ($key, qr/$keys[$_]/) } 0 .. $#keys;

    delete @hash { @keys[@indexes_to_delete] };     # Remove the unwanted keys

    splice @keys, $_, 1 foreach @indexes_to_delete; # Removes deleted ...
                                                    # ... elements from @keys.
                                                    # Avoids needless iterations.
}
  • my example was simplistic, but that's not the issue - I know how to find the keys that needs to be deleted, whether it is using grep or any magic function that gets a key that should be deleted and returns a list of other keys that should also be deleted. The question is how to nicely overcome the fact that if I delete a key before the loop reaches it, I'll still arrive to it later, although it doesn't already exist. I guess a simple next unless exists($hash{$key}) will do, but I wondered if there any other suggestions. – David B Oct 21 '10 at 15:55
2

You can mark the hash elements to be deleted by setting their values to undef. That avoids wasting space on a separate list of keys to be deleted, as well as avoiding the checks on elements already marked for deletion. And it would also be less wasteful to use each instead of for, which builds a list of all the hash keys before starting to iterate the loop

Like this

while ( my ($key, $val) = each %hash ) {

    next unless defined $val and should_be_deleted($key);

    $hash{$key}       = undef;
    $hash{$key.'a'}   = undef;
    $hash{'kkk'.$key} = undef;
}

while ( my ($key, $val) = each %hash ) {
    delete $hash{$key} unless defined $val;
}
  • Good approach assuming that undef isn't a valid value. There's a time/memory trade-off in doing second pass over the full hash instead of limiting it to the keys which should be deleted. You could optimize this slightly by deleting the primary key immediately (it's safe to delete the most recent element returned by each) so that the second pass was shorter. – Michael Carman Jul 11 '15 at 17:40

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