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Why does this code:

#include <iostream>
int main ()
{
  int x = 1;
  int y = ~x;
  std::cout << y;
}

Always print -(x+1)? If x = 00000001, shoudn't y = 11111110?

marked as duplicate by πάντα ῥεῖ c++ Oct 6 '16 at 19:22

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  • 3
    "If x = 00000001, shoudn't y = 11111110?" yes. But 11111110 as signed integer is -2. Two's Complement – tkausl Oct 6 '16 at 19:22
  • 1
    int has a sign. You might want to try the same with unsigned int – user463035818 Oct 6 '16 at 19:23
  • @black-goat: But y is 1...11111110 in your experiment. What made you think it wasn't in the first place? -(x+1) is -2, which is 1...11111110 on a 2's-complement system. I.e. everything works exactly as you expected it to. – AnT Oct 6 '16 at 19:24
  • If int has 32 bits, ~x is 11111111 11111111 11111111 11111110 in binary. int definitely has more than the 8 bits that would result in 11111110. The logic is the same regardless of the number of bits though. – user743382 Oct 6 '16 at 19:25

That's because you're on a two's complement system. C++ doesn't guaratee that, but all (citation needed?) modern architectures have this property.

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