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I was testing a regular expression in Oracle SQL and found something I could not understand:

-- NO MATCH
SELECT 1 FROM DUAL WHERE REGEXP_LIKE ('Professor Frank', '(^|\s)Prof[^\s]*(\s|$)');

Above doesn't match, while the following matches:

-- MATCH
SELECT 1 FROM DUAL WHERE REGEXP_LIKE ('Professor Frank', '(^|\s)Prof\S*(\s|$)'); 

In other regex flavors, It will be like \bProf[^\s]*\b versus \bProf\S*\b and have similar results. Note: Oracle SQL regex does not have \b or word boundary.

Question: Why don't [^\s]* and \S* work the same way in Oracle SQL?

I notice if I remove the (\s|$) at the end, the first regex will match.

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    If you replace the \s inside the character class with a space in the first example, it works as expected. Interesting, I would have expected a space character to be included in \s! – Gary_W Oct 6 '16 at 20:25
  • Try escaping the backslashes in the string, e.g. \\s – Barmar Oct 6 '16 at 20:31
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    \s is the escape sequence for a space, but NOT in a matching character set (that is, [.....] ). In a matching character set, only two characters have a special meaning, - for ranges and ] for closing the range. They can't be escaped; if needed in the matching set, ] must always be the first character and - must be first or last (best to leave it always to the end of the matching set). – mathguy Oct 6 '16 at 20:32
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    Ah so the Perl influenced extensions as listed in table 4-4 in the link below do not work in character classes due to @mathguy's explanation. Great info! docs.oracle.com/cd/B28359_01/appdev.111/b28424/adfns_regexp.htm. mathguy put this in an answer so you can get answer credit! – Gary_W Oct 6 '16 at 20:44
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    @Gary_W - regarding the votes to close: this is one of the ways in which SO is broken. I had a big fight with some of the site veterans several weeks ago about exactly this topic. In this specific question, the OP stated very clearly what the desired output was, what he tried, what doesn't work, and what we need to do to reproduce the problem. Then you get Excel experts or Android experts vote to close because THEY have no clue what the question means. The OP's fault? Give me a break! But this is a fight I/we will lose. – mathguy Oct 6 '16 at 21:54
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In Oracle regular expressions, \s is indeed the escape sequence for a space, but NOT in a matching character set (that is, [.....], or [^....] for excluding one character). In a matching character set, only two characters have a special meaning, - for ranges and ] for closing the set enumeration. They can't be escaped; if needed in the matching set, ] must always be the first character right after the opening [ (it is the ONLY position in which a closing ] stands for itself as a character, and does not denote the end of the matching set), and - must be first or last (best to leave it always to the end of the matching set) - anywhere else it is seen as a range marker. To include (or exclude, if using the [^.....] syntax) a space, just type an actual physical space in the matching set.

Edit: What I said above is not entirely right. There is another special character in a matching set, namely ^. If it is used in the first position, it means "match any character OTHER THAN." In any other position it stands for itself. For example, '[^^]' will match any single character OTHER THAN ^ (the first ^ has special meaning, the second stands in for itself). And, a closing bracket ] stands for itself if it is the second character in brackets, if the first character is ^ (with its SPECIAL meaning). That is, to match any single character OTHER THAN ], we can use the matching pattern '[^]]'.

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    To exclude all the white space characters (tab, new line, vertical tab, form feed, carriage return, or space) you could use a POSIX Character Class e.g. [^[:space:]] – Unoembre Oct 7 '16 at 2:15
  • @Unoembre So it does. I consider Oracle not allowing the perl extensions (like most other regex implementations) then a bug! :-b You have entered the Oracle zone..... – Gary_W Oct 7 '16 at 12:54
  • @Gary_W - a "bug" is something that works differently from what the documentation says, so this can't be a bug. Perhaps you disagree with Oracle's choices, that's a different thing. Also, Oracle does allow perl extensions (obviously, since \s IS recognized outside matching sets!) - see docs.oracle.com/cd/B19306_01/server.102/b14200/ap_posix003.htm – mathguy Oct 7 '16 at 12:58
  • I mean not allowing perl extensions inside a character class when they are allowed outside. – Gary_W Oct 7 '16 at 13:21

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