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1. long number = 564; 2. String str = number+""; 3. char[] num = str.toCharArray(); 4. number = number - num[0]; /* The value of number is 511 */

I am trying to subtract the first digit of the number from the number using this piece of code.

During debugging, i found out that the value of num[0] was 53. Can anyone explain what am i missing here.

  • 1
    53 is the ASCII code for the character 5 – M.M Oct 7 '16 at 6:08
  • Thanks, @M.M, but i want the number to be 559. Is it possible to convert 53 to 5 somehow? – Akhilesh Oct 7 '16 at 6:13
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    You could subtract 48 ? – M.M Oct 7 '16 at 6:14
  • A char is a number in the range 0 to 65535, but the characters (usually visible characters but sometimes "control characters" or other characters that have special meaning) associated with those numbers are defined by Unicode. Here is a link to the first 4096 characters.. Note that the digit 5 is at the position 0x0035 (which is 53 in decimal). – ajb Oct 7 '16 at 6:14
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    @ajb a better way is Character.getNumericValue(ch). Its intent is more obvious, and works for non-ASCII numbers too. – Andy Turner Oct 7 '16 at 7:00
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I would suggest you to change your fourth line to this:

number = number - Long.parseLong(Character.toString(num[0]));

Basically, what is happening here is that I first convert the char (num[0]) to a string, then parsed the string to a long.

ALternatively, you don't even need to convert the string to a char array! Use charAt() to get the char:

number = number - Long.parseLong(Character.toString(str.charAt(0)));
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When you are using the binary operator "-" the smaller datatype, in this case char, is promoted to long which returns the ASCII value of num[0] ('5') which is 53. To get the actual face value of num[0] convert it to String and parse it to Long as Sweeper has pointed out.

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It just feels wrong to convert a number to a string, extract the first char, convert back to number and subtract. Why don't you extract the first digit while working with numbers directly. Something like this would do:

    long number = 564;

    int digits = 0;
    assert (number > 0);
    for (long num = number; num > 1; num = num / 10 ) {
        digits += 1;
    }
    int firstDigit = (int) (number / Math.pow(10, digits -1));

    number = number - firstDigit;
    System.out.println(number);

If you want to get all digits:

    long number = 564;

    int digits = 0;
    assert (number > 0);
    for (long num = number; num > 1; num = num / 10 ) {
        digits += 1;
    }

    for (int digit = digits - 1; digit >= 0; digit--) {
        int currentDigit = (int) (number / Math.pow(10, digit)) % 10;
        System.out.println(currentDigit);
    }
  • This works perfectly for the first digit. In order to find other digits similar procedure would be better or "the string" approach? – Akhilesh Oct 7 '16 at 6:55
  • I 'd propose similar approach (numbers - not strings). The modification needed is straightforward. I ll update my answer. – sestus Oct 7 '16 at 7:09

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