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I have 150,000 rows of data which I'm attempting to query in Google BigQuery.

Column Text contains various lengths of text, from which I want to query for particular keywords.

I've gotten as far as the query below which returns all rows containing a particular keyword (e.g. facebook):

SELECT Text From Data.Set_1 
WHERE Text CONTAINS 'facebook'

Questions:

1) How do I improve the query so that it returns a total count of all occurrences of the keyword 'facebook' across 'Text' in a new column?

2) How do I upscale this to multiple keywords (facebook, cnn, bbc, twitter) and return a total count of each keyword present in the data (eg facebook 42, cnn 54, bbc 88, twitter 49)?

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2 Answers 2

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for BigQuery Legacy SQL

SELECT 
  keyword, 
  COUNT(1) AS rows, 
  SUM(INTEGER((LENGTH(Text) - LENGTH(REPLACE(Text, keyword, ''))) / LENGTH(keyword))) AS occurences 
FROM YourTable 
CROSS JOIN keywords
WHERE Text CONTAINS keyword
GROUP BY keyword

Example to play with

SELECT 
  keyword, 
  COUNT(1) AS rows, 
  SUM(INTEGER((LENGTH(Text) - LENGTH(REPLACE(Text, keyword, ''))) / LENGTH(keyword))) AS occurences 
FROM (
  SELECT Text FROM
    (SELECT 'facebookfacebookcnnbbccnn' AS Text),
    (SELECT 'facebook' AS Text), 
    (SELECT 'cnn' AS Text)
) AS words 
CROSS JOIN (
  SELECT keyword FROM 
    (SELECT 'facebook' AS keyword),
    (SELECT 'cnn' AS keyword), 
    (SELECT 'bbc' AS keyword)
) AS keywords
WHERE Text CONTAINS keyword
GROUP BY keyword

For BigQuery Standard SQL (see Enabling Standard SQL)

SELECT 
  keyword, 
  COUNT(1) AS `rows`, 
  SUM((LENGTH(Text) - LENGTH(REPLACE(Text, keyword, ''))) / LENGTH(keyword)) AS occurences  
FROM YourTable 
JOIN keywords
ON STRPOS(Text, keyword) > 0
GROUP BY keyword

Example to play with

WITH keywords AS (
  SELECT 'facebook' AS keyword UNION ALL
  SELECT 'cnn' AS keyword UNION ALL
  SELECT 'bbc' AS keyword 
),
words AS (
  SELECT 'facebookfacebookcnnbbccnn' AS Text UNION ALL
  SELECT 'facebook' AS Text UNION ALL
  SELECT 'cnn' AS Text 
)
SELECT 
  keyword, 
  COUNT(1) AS `rows`, 
  SUM((LENGTH(Text) - LENGTH(REPLACE(Text, keyword, ''))) / LENGTH(keyword)) AS occurences  
FROM words 
JOIN keywords
ON STRPOS(Text, keyword) > 0
GROUP BY keyword
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  • 1
    The "Text LIKE CONCAT('%', keyword, '%')" is dangerous because keyword may contain special characters that need to be escaped. It is also not very performant. Better function to use here would be "STRPOS(Text, keyword) > 0" Oct 7, 2016 at 17:59
  • This works perfectly! Thanks Mikhail. Additionally - is there a way for this query to scan two columns for keywords? E.g Column A: Text, Column B: Text_2 Oct 9, 2016 at 19:01
  • my recommendation is: if this answer addressed your question and helped you - accept it. At least this will give you few more reputation points for future. Then try to adopt this solution to your new "challenge" (with two columns). Try to come with something and if still issue - ask/post new question and we will be happy to help Oct 9, 2016 at 19:26
  • btw, as a hint - instead of using just Text - you can concatenate Text and Text_2 - see cloud.google.com/bigquery/sql-reference/…. hope this hint will make it easier for you :o) Oct 9, 2016 at 19:46
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You can use a derived table to include all the words you are looking for, and then use aggregation to count the matches:

SELECT w.keyword, COUNT(s.Text)
From (SELECT 'facebook' as keyword UNION ALL
      SELECT 'cnn'
     ) w LEFT JOIN
     Data.Set_1 s
     ON s.Text CONTAINS w.keyword
GROUP BY w.keyword;

Do note: This is not particularly efficient. The performance should be roughly linear in the number of keywords.

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  • Hi Gordon - Don't you sleep..? I always see you here on Stackoverflow :)
    – Teja
    Oct 7, 2016 at 10:12
  • Thanks Gordon, this looks to be useful - I'm pretty new to SQL so bear with me.. can I ask why the "w." before keyword, and "s." before text? Oct 8, 2016 at 9:17
  • @EdMoonLittle . . . Because I recommend using table aliases in all queries that have more than one table (optional in queries with only one table). Oct 8, 2016 at 12:59

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