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I'm building a game and in order to make it work, I need to generate a list of "pre-built" or "ready to call" expressions. I'm trying to do this with lambda expressions, but am running into an issue generating the lookup table. The code I have is similar to the following:

import inspect

def test(*args):
    string = "Test Function: "
    for i in args:
        string += str(i) + " "
    print(string)

funct_list = []

# The problem is in this for loop
for i in range(20):
    funct_list.append(lambda: test(i, "Hello World"))

for i in funct_list:
    print(inspect.getsource(i))

The output I get is:

funct_list.append(lambda: test(i, "Hello World"))
funct_list.append(lambda: test(i, "Hello World"))
funct_list.append(lambda: test(i, "Hello World"))
funct_list.append(lambda: test(i, "Hello World"))
...

and I need it to go:

funct_list.append(lambda: test(1, "Hello World"))
funct_list.append(lambda: test(2, "Hello World"))
funct_list.append(lambda: test(3, "Hello World"))
funct_list.append(lambda: test(4, "Hello World"))
...

I tried both of the following and neither work

for i in range(20):
    funct_list.append(lambda: test(i, "Hello World"))

for i in range(20):
    x = (i, "Hello World")
    funct_list.append(lambda: test(*x))

My question is how do you generate lists of lambda expressions with some of the variables inside the lambda expression already set.

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As others have mentioned, Python's closures are late binding, which means that variables from an outside scope referenced in a closure (in other words, the variables closed over) are looked up at the moment the closure is called and not at the time of definition.

In your example, the closure in question is formed when your lambda references the variable i from the outside scope. However, when your lambda is called later on, the loop has already finished and left the variable i with the value 19.

An easy but not particularly elegant fix is to use a default argument for the lambda:

for i in range(20):
    funct_list.append(lambda x=i: test(x, "Hello World"))

Unlike closure variables, default arguments are bound early and therefore achieve the desired effect of capturing the value of the variable i at the time of lambda definition.

A better way is use functools.partial which allows you to partially apply some arguments of the function, "fixing" them to a certain value:

from functools import partial

for i in range(20):
    funct_list.append(partial(lambda x: test(x, "Hello World"), i))
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    or better yet just use functools.partial (which is not late binding) , and I would argue is less gross ... – Joran Beasley Oct 7 '16 at 19:20
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    Eh, but at least state why they should use default arguments – Moses Koledoye Oct 7 '16 at 19:20
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    I was going to but I pressed submit too early by accident. I'm going to expand my answer. – dkasak Oct 7 '16 at 19:21

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