45

Is there a numpy method which is equivalent to the builtin pop for python lists?

Popping obviously doesn't work on numpy arrays, and I want to avoid a list conversion.

1
  • 1
    pop doesn't exist in numpy and by design it is not recommended to emulate it. You would better approach the algorithm you need to write without using a pop pattern
    – Zeugma
    Oct 9, 2016 at 15:52

6 Answers 6

27

There is no pop method for NumPy arrays, but you could just use basic slicing (which would be efficient since it returns a view, not a copy):

In [104]: y = np.arange(5); y
Out[105]: array([0, 1, 2, 3, 4])

In [106]: last, y = y[-1], y[:-1]

In [107]: last, y
Out[107]: (4, array([0, 1, 2, 3]))

If there were a pop method it would return the last value in y and modify y.

Above,

last, y = y[-1], y[:-1]

assigns the last value to the variable last and modifies y.

2
  • 2
    But list.pop can take an index as a parameter. This won't do.
    – Brambor
    May 15, 2020 at 23:29
  • Can you explain this l1=[10,11,12,13,14,16,17,18] [l1.pop(l1.index(i)) for i in l1 if i%2==0] print("l1:",l1) output - l1: [11, 13, 16, 17] Nov 29, 2020 at 13:44
16

Here is one example using numpy.delete():

import numpy as np
arr = np.array([[1,2,3,4], [5,6,7,8], [9,10,11,12]])
print(arr)
#  array([[ 1,  2,  3,  4],
#         [ 5,  6,  7,  8],
#         [ 9, 10, 11, 12]])
arr = np.delete(arr, 1, 0)
print(arr)
# array([[ 1,  2,  3,  4],
#        [ 9, 10, 11, 12]])
1
  • 1
    pop returns the value and the list become shorter
    – parvij
    Jan 28, 2020 at 3:48
5

Pop doesn't exist for NumPy arrays, but you can use NumPy indexing in combination with array restructuring, for example hstack/vstack or numpy.delete(), to emulate popping.

Here are some example functions I can think of (which apparently don't work when the index is -1, but you can fix this with a simple conditional):

def poprow(my_array,pr):
    """ row popping in numpy arrays
    Input: my_array - NumPy array, pr: row index to pop out
    Output: [new_array,popped_row] """
    i = pr
    pop = my_array[i]
    new_array = np.vstack((my_array[:i],my_array[i+1:]))
    return [new_array,pop]

def popcol(my_array,pc):
    """ column popping in numpy arrays
    Input: my_array: NumPy array, pc: column index to pop out
    Output: [new_array,popped_col] """
    i = pc
    pop = my_array[:,i]
    new_array = np.hstack((my_array[:,:i],my_array[:,i+1:]))
    return [new_array,pop]

This returns the array without the popped row/column, as well as the popped row/column separately:

>>> A = np.array([[1,2,3],[4,5,6]])
>>> [A,poparow] = poprow(A,0)
>>> poparow
array([1, 2, 3])

>>> A = np.array([[1,2,3],[4,5,6]])
>>> [A,popacol] = popcol(A,2)
>>> popacol
array([3, 6])
5

There isn't any pop() method for numpy arrays unlike List, Here're some alternatives you can try out-

  • Using Basic Slicing
>>> x = np.array([1,2,3,4,5])
>>> x = x[:-1]; x
>>> [1,2,3,4]
  • Or, By Using delete()

Syntax - np.delete(arr, obj, axis=None)

arr: Input array
obj: Row or column number to delete
axis: Axis to delete

>>> x = np.array([1,2,3,4,5])
>>> x = x = np.delete(x, len(x)-1, 0)
>>> [1,2,3,4]
1

The most 'elegant' solution for retrieving and removing a random item in Numpy is this:

import numpy as np
import random

arr = np.array([1, 3, 5, 2, 8, 7])
element = random.choice(arr)
elementIndex = np.where(arr == element)[0][0]
arr = np.delete(arr, elementIndex)

For curious coders:

The np.where() method returns two lists. The first returns the row indexes of the matching elements and the second the column indexes. This is useful when searching for elements in a 2d array. In our case, the first element of the first returned list is interesting.

1

The important thing is that it takes one from the original array and deletes it. If you don't m ind the superficial implementation of a single method to complete the process, the following code will do what you want.

import numpy as np

a = np.arange(0, 3)
i = 0
selected, others = a[i], np.delete(a, i)

print(selected)
print(others)

# result:
# 0
# [1 2]

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.