46

This is a design question regarding the implementation of a Pipeline. The following is my naive implementation.

Interface for individual steps/stages in the pipeline:

public interface Step<T, U> {
    public U execute(T input);
}

Concrete implementations of steps/stages in pipeline:

public class StepOne implements Step<Integer, Integer> {
    @Override
    public Integer execute(Integer input) {
        return input + 100;
    }
}

public class StepTwo implements Step<Integer, Integer> {
    @Override
    public Integer execute(Integer input) {
        return input + 500;
    }
}

public class StepThree implements Step<Integer, String> {
    @Override
    public String execute(Integer input) {
        return "The final amount is " + input;
    }
}

The pipeline class will hold/register the steps in the pipeline and execute them one after the other:

public class Pipeline {
    private List<Step> pipelineSteps = new ArrayList<>();
    private Object firstStepInput = 100;

    public void addStep(Step step) {
        pipelineSteps.add(step);
    }

    public void execute() {
        for (Step step : pipelineSteps) {
            Object out = step.execute(firstStepInput);
            firstStepInput = out;
        }
   }
}

Diver program to execute the pipeline:

public class Main {
    public static void main(String[] args) {
        Pipeline pipeline = new Pipeline();
        pipeline.addStep(new StepOne());
        pipeline.addStep(new StepTwo());
        pipeline.addStep(new StepThree());

        pipeline.execute();
    } 
}

However, as you can see the naive implementation has many limitations.

One of the major ones is that since the requirement is that the output of each step could be of any type, the naive implementation is not type-safe (the execute method in the Pipeline class). If I happen to wire the steps in the pipeline incorrectly, the app will fail.

Can anyone help me design the solution by adding to what I have coded, or point me towards an already existing pattern to solve this?

5
  • 1
    this question links to this document which references patterns.
    – Nick Bell
    Oct 9, 2016 at 18:48
  • Thank you @NickBell for pointing to the paper. However, through the paper, I am not able to understand how the pipeline can be designed so that it could handle the stages/steps with different output types. Oct 9, 2016 at 19:14
  • 2
    I would consider looking into Java 1.8+ streams as they provide functionality / doc's to the example you've stated. See here for duplicate
    – Nick Bell
    Oct 9, 2016 at 20:57
  • Thanks Nick for putting the link of the duplicate question. The example provided there helped a lot. Oct 9, 2016 at 23:00
  • @NickBell link is down
    – yolob 21
    Apr 16, 2020 at 18:33

6 Answers 6

33

why do you need an additional Pipeline class ? I think you can remove the middle man. this will make your api simpler, for example:

Step<Integer, String> source = Step.of(Object::toString);
Step<Integer, Integer> toHex = source.pipe(it -> Integer.parseInt(it, 16));

toHex.execute(11/*0x11*/);// return 17;

you can implement your pipeline pattern simply in as below :

interface Step<I, O> {

    O execute(I value);

    default <R> Step<I, R> pipe(Step<O, R> source) {
        return value -> source.execute(execute(value));
    }

    static <I, O> Step<I, O> of(Step<I, O> source) {
        return source;
    }
}

in prior java version you can use an abstract class instead:

abstract static class Step<I, O> {

    public abstract O execute(I value);

    public <R> Step<I, R> pipe(Step<O, R> source) {
        return new Step<I, R>() {
            @Override
            public R execute(I value) {
                return source.execute(Step.this.execute(value));
            }
        };
    }

    public static <I, O> Step<I, O> of(Step<I, O> source) {
        return source;
    }
}
4
  • 2
    By decents, underrated answer!
    – Grim
    Aug 29, 2017 at 21:11
  • 1
    This is amazing. Can you explain how Step.of(Object::toString) works? How is toString being interpreted as Step<I, O>?
    – z0r
    May 24, 2019 at 4:20
  • Just implemented this in an application, so little code yet so effective. Very nice.
    – RedShift
    Nov 1, 2019 at 13:32
  • 3
    @z0r: it's the same as Step.of(input -> input.toString());. The :: operator is a lambda expression to reference a method of a class.
    – RedShift
    Nov 1, 2019 at 13:35
21

I would focus on

If I happen to wire the steps in the pipeline incorrectly, the app will fail.

Yes, this is a problem. StepThree is the stranger here. I do not think one simple pattern might help, I do think it must be a combination of strategy and builder pattern. For example:

Pipeline<Integer,Integer> intPipe = new Pipeline<>();
intPipe = intPipe.add(new StepOne()); // increment 100
intPipe = intPipe.add(new StepTwo()); // increment 500
Pipeline<String, Integer> strPipe = intPipe.add(new StepThree()); // convert

Whereat Pipeline is like this:

public static class Pipeline<IN, OUT> {
   //...
   public<A> Pipeline<OUT,A> add(Step<IN,A> step) {
     pipelineSteps.add(step);
     return (Pipeline<OUT,A>)this;
   }
}

Using the fast-builder-syntax this might work:

Pipeline<String, Integer> pipe = new Pipeline<Integer, Integer>()
    .add(new StepOne()).add(new StepTwo()).add(new StepThree());

This should work since generics are not part of the bytecode.

2
  • Thanks Peter for answering the question! :) Oct 9, 2016 at 23:02
  • @PrashantChauhan at your service ;D
    – Grim
    Oct 10, 2016 at 4:28
14

You don't need to create a new Interface for this.

Java 8 already has a Functional Interface called Function and it allows you to create a Chaining of Functions (in other words, your Pipeline).

Function<Integer, Integer> addOne = it -> {
            System.out.println(it + 1);
            return it + 1;
        };

Function<Integer, Integer> addTwo = it -> {
            System.out.println(it + 2);
            return it + 2;
        };

Function<Integer, Integer> timesTwo = input -> {
            System.out.println(input * 2);
            return input * 2;
        };

final Function<Integer, Integer> pipe = addOne
        .andThen(timesTwo)
        .andThen(addTwo);

pipe.apply(10);

If you want to read more about Functional Interfaces: https://medium.com/@julio.falbo/java-recent-history-java-8-part-2-functional-interface-predefined-functional-interface-2494f25610d5

2
  • Can we also have an abstract method inside the algorithm, and force the user to implement that method. Something like: abstract Function<Integer, Integer> userDefined; final Function<Integer, Integer> pipe = sourceInt.andThen(userDefined).andThen()... Mar 29, 2020 at 12:38
  • 1
    Up vote for using builtin interfaces. This simplest solution.
    – Mr Jedi
    May 7, 2020 at 17:52
6

Your approach is pretty good. However, I'd code the Pipeline class like this:

public class Pipeline {
    private List<Step> pipelineSteps = new ArrayList<>();
    private Object firstStepInput = 100;

    public Pipeline() {
        pipelineSteps.add(new StepOne());
        pipelineSteps.add(new StepTwo());
        pipelineSteps.add(new StepThree());
    }

    public void execute() {
        for (Step step : pipelineSteps) {
            Object out = step.execute(firstStepInput);
            firstStepInput = out;
        }
    }

    public String getResult() {
        return (String) firstStepInput;
    }
}

This way, all of the specific step knowledge is encapsulated in the Pipeline class.

In this case, the execute method can perform a loop. However, the execute class can perform the steps one by one, if necessary.

1
  • 1
    Thank you for pointing out how to correctly encapsulate the Pipeline class. Oct 9, 2016 at 22:57
1

You can basically use chain of responsibility design pattern

1
0
public class Pipeline {

    private List<Step> pipelineSteps = new ArrayList<>();
    private Object firstStepInput = 100;

    public Pipeline() {
        pipelineSteps.add(new StepOne());
        pipelineSteps.add(new StepTwo());
        pipelineSteps.add(new StepThree());
}
1
  • Please format (there's a preview window when you write your answer) & explain your answer. You do want people to understand what you did, don't you ?
    – Rafalon
    Oct 6, 2017 at 9:17

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