3

C++ newbie here! I would like to simulate a population containing patches, containing individuals, containing chromosomes, containing genes.

What are the pros and cons of using a series of simple classes versus a highly dimensional matrix in C++? Typically, does the time to access a memory slot varies in between the two technics?

Highly dimensional Matrix

One could make "a vector of vectors of vectors of vectors" (or a C-style highly dimensional arrays of integers) and access any gene in memory with

for (int patch=0;patch<POP.size();patch++)
{
    for (int ind=0;ind<POP[patch].size();patch++)
    {
        for (int chrom=0;chrom<POP[patch][ind].size();chrom++)
        {
            for (int gene=0;gene<POP[patch][ind][chrom].size();gene++)
            {
                 POP[patch][ind][chrom][gene];
            }
        }
    }   
}

Series of Simple Classes

One could use a series of simple classes and access any gene in memory with

for (int patch=0;patch<POP->PATCHES.size();patch++)
{
    for (int ind=0;ind<POP->PATCHES[patch]->INDIVIDUALS.size();patch++)
    {
        for (int chrom=0;chrom<POP->PATCHES[patch]->INDIVIDUALS[ind]->CHROMOSOMES.size();chrom++)
        {
            for (int gene=0;gene<POP->PATCHES[patch]->INDIVIDUALS[ind]->CHROMOSOMES[chrom]->GENES.size();gene++)
            {
                POP->PATCHES[patch]->INDIVIDUALS[ind]->CHROMOSOMES[chrom]->GENES[gene];
            }
        }
    }   
}
  • Are patch, ind, chrom and gene simply integer indexes rather than something like std::strings? – sjrowlinson Oct 9 '16 at 21:16
  • Yes! I tried to clarify this point by writing out for loops and defining the object types of patch, ind, chrom and gene – Remi.b Oct 9 '16 at 21:24
4

While a high-dimensional matrix would work, consider that you might want to add more information to an individual. It might not just have chromosomes, but also an age, siblings, parents, phenotypes, et cetera. It is then natural to have a class Individual, which can contain all that information along with its list of chromosomes. Using classes will group relevant information together.

  • Thank you. This is right that I might end up willing to code some class specific function (called methods in python, not sure they have the same name in the C++ jargon). I was mainly concerned with the time to access a memory slot. Should I expect the "series of simple classes" method to be slower? – Remi.b Oct 9 '16 at 21:09
  • 1
    Using classes does not necessarily mean it is slower. Writing a correct and understandable implementation should be your first priority, optimizing comes second. When you are optimizing, determine where most of the CPU time is spent. Is it in some operation on the genes? Then you want to make sure the data containing genes are close together in memory. class Chromosome { vector<Gene> genes; }; still ensures the genes are close together. In fact, if each class only contains a vector<> member, there is no overhead compared to a big vector<vector<vector<vector<...>>>>. – G. Sliepen Oct 11 '16 at 19:25
2

While I in general agree with @g-sliepen's answer, there is an additional point you should know about:

C++ gives you the ability to make a distinction between interface and type. You can leave the type abstract for the users of your code (even if that is only you) and provide a finite set of operations on it.

Using this pattern allows you to change the implementation completely (e.g. back to vectors for parallel computation etc.) later without having to change the code using it (e.g. a concrete simulation).

1

I won't cover what's already been suggested as it is generally a good idea to store your individual entities as a class with all relevant fields associared with it, but I'll just address your first suggestion:

The issue with using something like a std::vector<std::vector<std::vector<std::vector<type>>>> (apart from the fact it's a pain to handle generically) is that whilst the overall std::vector enclosing the structure has contiguous storage (so long as you aren't storing bools in your std::vector that is) the inner vectors are not contiguous with each other or the other elements.

Due to this, if you are storing a large amount of data in your structure and need access and iteration to be as fast as possible, this method of storage is not ideal - it also complicates matters of iterating through the entire structure.

A good solution for storing a large multi-dimensional "matrix" (technically a rank 4 tensor in this case I suppose) when you require fast iteration and random access is to write a wrapper around a single std::vector in some row-major / column-major configuration such that all your data is stored as a contiguous block and you can iterate over it all via a single loop or call to std::for_each (for example). Then each index by which you access the structure would correspond to patch, ind, chrom and gene in order.

An example of a pre-built data structure which could handle this is boost::multi_array if you'd rather not code the wrapper yourself.

1

There are two major ways to do multidimensional arrays. Vector of vectors (aka jagged array) and really multidimensional array - n dimensional cube. Using the latter one means for example, that all chromozomes have the same amount of genes and every individual has the same amount of chromozomes. If You can accept those restrictions, You get some advantages like continuous memory storage.

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