2

Eigen has a function LinSpaced(size, begin, end).

#include <iostream>
#include <Eigen/Dense>

using namespace std;
using namespace Eigen;

int main () {

    cout << ArrayXi::LinSpaced(46342, 0, 46341) << endl;
    /*...
     46338
     46339
     46340
    -46340*/

    cout << ArrayXi::LinSpaced(46341, 1, 46341) << endl;
    /*...
    46338
    46339
    46340
    46341*/

    cout << ArrayXi::LinSpaced(46342, 1, 46342) << endl;
    /*...
     46339
     46340
     46341
    -46339*/

}

I'm using 64-bit gcc 6.2.1/clang 3.8.1, no flags, and the latest Eigen from Mercurial. I know that 46340 is the largest number you can square without overflowing a 32-bit integer, but that alone can't account for this cryptic behaviour.

  • 1
    why did you downvote this question? – user357269 Oct 10 '16 at 6:52
  • Probably because your example isn't reproducible. Prepare a minimal reproducible example, list what system you're using, compiler flags and any other important information. Beyond enabling others to help you, you often end up understanding the issue better and solving it yourself. – Avi Ginsburg Oct 10 '16 at 7:15
  • @AviGinsburg, I added my GCC version and I'm not using any compiler flags. Would it help if I added int main and some couts? – user357269 Oct 10 '16 at 7:25
  • Ya, that's what a minimal reproducible example is about. Then others can copy-paste your code and not use assumed code that doesn't reproduce the problem. – Avi Ginsburg Oct 10 '16 at 7:33
  • 1
    This is a shortcoming of a recent "fix": bug 698, and of course this has to be fixed! – ggael Oct 11 '16 at 19:27

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