8

Say you define your component like so:

interface IProps {
  req: string;
  defaulted: string;
}

class Comp extends React.Component<IProps, void> {
  static defaultProps = {
    defaulted: 'test',
  };

  render() {
    const { defaulted } = this.props;

    return (
      <span>{defaulted.toUpperCase()}</span>
    );
  }
}

when you want to use it, TypeScript wants the defaulted prop from you, even though it's defined in defaultProps:

<Comp req="something" />  // ERROR: TypeScript: prop 'defaulted' is required

However, if you define the props interface like so:

interface IProps {
  req: string;
  defaulted?: string;  // note the ? here
}

then you cannot use it in:

render() {
  const { defaulted } = this.props;  // ERROR: prop 'defaulted' possibly undefined

  return (
    <span>{defaulted.toUpperCase()}</span>
  );
}

How to define the IProps, defaultProps and component correctly so the types make sense?

EDIT:

I'm using the strictNullChecks flag.

14
  • "I have them defaulted" ...do you?
    – jonrsharpe
    Oct 10, 2016 at 14:25
  • I am pretty sure I do: static defaultProps: IDefaultProps = { validate: () => null, defaultValue: '', };
    – Idefixx
    Oct 10, 2016 at 14:26
  • Alright, let me rephrase: they don't appear to be defaulted in the code you show in the question. Give a minimal reproducible example.
    – jonrsharpe
    Oct 10, 2016 at 14:26
  • If you add the ? (like you have with index) they will be optional and you won't get the error about being potentially undefined. Then, default their value where you use them.
    – rg88
    Oct 10, 2016 at 14:26
  • @Stuart but then I cannot use it within the component - TypeScript complains that they are potentially undefined
    – Idefixx
    Oct 10, 2016 at 14:29

3 Answers 3

4

I have an example with the following code (ComponentBase is just my wrapper around React.Component).

Edit: updated code to work with 'strictNullChecks' setting

interface IExampleProps {
    name: string;
    otherPerson?: string;
}

/**
 * Class with props with default values
 *
 * @class Example
 * @extends {ComponentBase<IComponentBaseSubProps, {}>}
 */
export class Example extends ComponentBase<IExampleProps, {}> {
    public static defaultProps: IExampleProps = {
        otherPerson: "Simon",
        name: "Johnny"
    };

    constructor(props: IExampleProps) {
        super(props);
    }

    public render(): JSX.Element {
        const person: string = this.props.otherPerson === undefined ? "" : this.props.otherPerson;
        return(
            <div>
                <h1><small>Message by ComponentBaseSub: Hello {this.props.name} and {person} </small></h1>
            </div>
        );
    }
}

I have no issues using Visual Studio Code, TypeScript 2.0.3, TSLint 0.5.39.

11
  • maybe because {this.props.otherPerson} is OK to be undefined. try to add a variable, say, const person: string = this.props.otherPerson; and see if it complains
    – Idefixx
    Oct 11, 2016 at 9:20
  • @Idefixx Adding exactly that variable to the body of the 'render' method still does not result in the issue you reported. Oct 11, 2016 at 9:42
  • You can check my react samples fork on github.com/boxstart/react-typescript-samples. Example 02 contains the optional property and defaultProps from my example above. If you still get the warning / error using this project, then you might need to look for a setting in your environment. Oct 11, 2016 at 9:50
  • aaaah, I'm using the strictNullChecks flag. Try it with that
    – Idefixx
    Oct 11, 2016 at 14:04
  • Tried it and indeed I'm getting the message too. This isn't really unexpected behaviour, because in the reference to you component (jsx / tsx), it is possible to set the property to undefined and so in your render method the property value would still be 'undefined', despite the default value in the component. Oct 11, 2016 at 14:19
1

Even simpler is

<span>{(defaulted as string).toUpperCase()}</span>

Works the same way with properties. If Foo requires the barProp property but Parent does not and gets it through defaultProps, Parent's render method can do

<Foo barProp={this.props.barProp as string} />
1
  • 1
    thanks! null checks with defaultProps defeats the benefit of using defaultProps
    – Larry
    Jul 5, 2018 at 11:46
1

If you know for sure the prop will have a default value, you can use the null assertion type operator, like this:

render() {
  const { defaulted } = this.props;
  return (
    <span>{defaulted!.toUpperCase()}</span>
  );
}

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service and acknowledge you have read our privacy policy.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.