13

I'm testing a method that manipulates a collection. Given a set of parameters it should contain exactly one element that matches a condition. Edit: The collection might have several other elements not matching the condition aswell.

I'm using Single to test that behaviour, which works fine, as it will fail the test by throwing an exception if there is no match at all or more than one match. But there is no actual assert, which somehow violates arrange, act, assert. So I'm wondering if this is a bad practice and if there's a better way to do this.

Following pseudo code to demonstrate my question:

[TestMethod]
public void TestMethod()
{
    List list = MethodToTest(param1, param2);

    list.Single(s => s.Matches(condition));

    //No actual Assert
}
  • 3
    I think assert is better, at least because you may provide more informative message about what and where failed. – Evk Oct 10 '16 at 17:45
  • 1
    This is an opinion based question... In my opinion I'd not use Single to validate that there is only 1 item in UTs... I'd use Assert.Equal(1,list.Count(...)) – Gilad Green Oct 10 '16 at 17:45
  • 1
    @Jon which will still throw when there are more than one results. – CodeCaster Oct 10 '16 at 17:47
  • 3
    In my opinion, this is not readable. If I was reading a suite of tests to understand what is going on, I would stop there for a few seconds to understand what you are trying to achieve. Tests should be easy to read, no surprises. – gdyrrahitis Oct 10 '16 at 17:47
  • 1
    Probably asserting list.Count(s => s.Matches(condition)) == 1 would be better. – Ivan Stoev Oct 10 '16 at 17:47
16

I'm wondering if this is a bad practice and if there's a better way to do this.

Yes and yes.

it will fail the test by throwing an exception if there is no match at all or more than one match.

Don't fail the test by throwing an exception. Fail the test by failing the test. Your test framework has a mechanism for asserting the condition being tested by the test. You bought this test framework, and now you are resisting using its features. Use the test framework as it was designed to be used, or, if you don't like it, abandon it and choose a framework you like better. But don't do end-runs around its mechanisms.

Unexpected exceptions are not necessarily test failures; they could be buggy tests. You need to be able to tell the difference. The way you tell is: if the exception originates in the code under test, its a bug in the code. If it originates in the test code, its a bug in the test. And now you go and detect a bug in the code under test by making the testing code throw. And now it is harder to tell where the bug is. Don't make your future self think that hard; don't write surprising code that deliberately avoids the conventions of the testing platform.

  • Thanks for your answer. You're right I hadn't thought about the difference between a failing test and a buggy test. – Phonolog Oct 11 '16 at 8:43

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