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I am trying to solve a problem with numbers:

I receive a number and have to calculate the numbers that add up to get that number, there are some rules that make it harder

Rules:

  • Positive numbers only, cannot include 0 in the sum
  • The sum must be composed of only 6 numbers, no more no less
  • The numbers to add can go from 1 to 45
  • Cannot repeat numbers
  • The maximum sum is 255
  • The minimum sum is 21
  • A valid combination is 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6 just as 6, 5, 4, 3, 2, 1 or 3, 4, 5, 1, 6, 2 but only counts as one combination because contain the same numbers but in different order

I have been trying to do it like in the knapsack problem but the difference is that I must choose a fixed amount of numbers to get the sum.

If anyone has an idea of an algorithm to fix this, I would really appreciate it.

  • 1
    Something like this? stackoverflow.com/questions/4632322/… – OneCricketeer Oct 11 '16 at 2:20
  • Yes, it is similar to that one. I am trying to get it working basing on that algorithm – Linkavich14 Oct 11 '16 at 2:24
  • So what have you tried so far? – Dijkgraaf Oct 11 '16 at 2:36
  • Currently I am generating all the combinations but repeating numbers and using more or less of the allowed numbers to get the sum – Linkavich14 Oct 11 '16 at 2:51
1
+50

In Java: If you need to list the combinations:

static void sumToValue(int limit, int sum, int count, List<Integer> resultIP) {
    if (limit >= 0 && sum == 0 && count == 0) {
        // print resultIP, because it is one of the answers.
        System.out.println("sum(" + Arrays.toString(resultIP.toArray()) + ")");
    } else if (limit <= 0 || count == 0 || sum <= 0) {
        // not what we want
        return;
    } else {
        // Two options: choose current limit number or not
        sumToValue(limit - 1, sum, count, resultIP);// Not choose the limit
                                                    // number

        // or choose the limit number
        List<Integer> resultNext = new ArrayList<Integer>(resultIP);// copy
                                                                    // resultIP
        resultNext.add(limit);
        sumToValue(limit - 1, sum - limit, count - 1, resultNext);
    }
}

If you only need the count:

static void sumToValueCount(int limit, int sum, int count) {
    int dp[][][] = new int[limit + 1][sum + 1][count + 1];
    for (int i = 0; i <= limit; i++) {
        for (int j = 0; j <= sum; j++) {
            for (int k = 0; k <= count; k++) {
                if (j == 0 && k == 0) {
                    dp[i][j][k] = 1;
                } else if (i == 0 || j <= 0 || k == 0) {
                    dp[i][j][k] = 0;
                } else {
                    // check to prevent negative index
                    if (j - i >= 0) {
                        // two options: choose the number or not choose the number
                        dp[i][j][k] = dp[i - 1][j - i][k - 1] + dp[i - 1][j][k];
                    } else {
                        dp[i][j][k] = dp[i - 1][j][k];
                    }
                }
            }
        }
    }
    System.out.println(dp[limit][sum][count]);
}

In main function call like this:

//limit is 45, sum is the sum we want, count is 6 referring to the question.
sumToValue(45, 255, 6, new ArrayList<Integer>());
sumToValueCount(45, 255, 6);
| improve this answer | |
4

You can use dynamic programming to solve this problem.

Figure that dp[N][LastNumber][ElementCount] is How many ways to yield N with the last number is LastNumber and the number of element is ElementCount. With N = 1..255, LastNumber = 1..45, ElementCount = 1..6

You can get dp[N][LastNumber][ElementCount] from subsolution dp[N-LastNumber][1][ElementCount-1] + dp[N-LastNumber][2][ElementCount-1] ... + dp[N-LastNumber][LastNumber-1][ElementCount-1]

The base case is dp[i][i][1] = 1 for i = 1..45

if it is asked how many ways to sum up M, the asnwer is dp[M][i][6] for i = 1..45

| improve this answer | |
-2

Here is the code I come up with in C++ using dynamic programming. n is the maximum number to add. m is the element count and s is the target sum.

#include <iostream>
#include <algorithm>
#include <vector>

using namespace std;

int mini(int n, int m) {
    return m * (m + 1) / 2;
}
int maxi(int n, int m) {
    return m * (2 * n - m + 1) / 2;
}

typedef std::vector<unsigned long long> Long1D;
typedef std::vector<Long1D> Long2D;
typedef std::vector<Long2D> Long3D;

int main(int argc, const char * argv[]) {
    int n, m, s;
    n = 45;
    m = 6;
    s = 21;

    if ((s < mini(n, m)) || (s > maxi(n, m))) {
        cout << 0 << endl;
        return 0;
    }

    Long3D dp(2, Long2D(m + 1, Long1D(s + 1)));

    for (int i = 1; i <= n; ++i) {
        for (int j = 1; j <= min(i, m); ++j) {
            for (int k = 1; k <= s; ++k) {
                if ((k < mini(i, j)) || (k > maxi(i, j))) {
                    dp[i % 2][j][k] = 0;
                }
                else if ((k == mini(i, j)) || (k == maxi(i, j)) || j == 1) {
                    dp[i % 2][j][k] = 1;
                }
                else {
                    dp[i % 2][j][k] = 0;
                    // !IMPORTANT -- general situation: dp[i][j][k]=dp[i-1][j-1][k-j]+dp[i-1][j][k-j]
                    if (k - j > mini(i - 1, j - 1))
                        dp[i % 2][j][k] += dp[(i - 1) % 2][j - 1][k - j];
                    if (k - j < maxi(i - 1, j))
                        dp[i % 2][j][k] += dp[(i - 1) % 2][j][k - j];
                }
            }
        }
    }

    cout << dp[n % 2][m][s] << endl;
    return 0;
}
| improve this answer | |
  • While this link may answer the question, it is better to include the essential parts of the answer here and provide the link for reference. Link-only answers can become invalid if the linked page changes – iBug Jan 15 '18 at 8:05
  • This edit makes your answer may better, but you could remove the link as it's no longer needed and you also may consider adding some more explanation ho help future readers understand you code more efficiently – Filnor Jan 15 '18 at 8:12
  • @icer's answer probably work nice and clean, and is at least easier to grasp or explain. I'm giving him the bounty. I was trying to help but I definitely do not feel welcomed or appreciated at all. Sorry, you may delete this post. – Lim SY Jan 15 '18 at 17:50

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