2

I read in a book that we can extend functionality of existing objects using the following code:

var Point = function(x, y) {
    this.x = x; 
  this.y = y; 
}

Point.prototype.moveBy = function(deltaX, deltaY) {
    this.x += deltaX; 
  this.y += deltaY; 
}
Point.prototype.moveTo = function(otherPoint) {
    this.x = otherPoint.x; 
  this.y = otherPoint.y; 
}
var p1= new Point(100, 200); 
p1.moveBy(10, 20); 
var p2= new Point(25, 50); 
p2.moveTo(p1); 
alert("p2.x: " + p2.x + " p2.y: " + p2.y); 

I just found that I can get the same results with prototype as follows:

var Point = function(x, y) {
    this.x = x; 
  this.y = y; 
}

Point.prototype = {
    moveBy: function(deltaX, deltaY) {
    this.x += deltaX; 
  this.y += deltaY; 
    }, 

    moveTo: function(otherPoint) {
    this.x = otherPoint.x; 
  this.y = otherPoint.y; 
    }
}; 
var p1= new Point(100, 200); 
p1.moveBy(10, 20); 
var p2= new Point(25, 50); 
p2.moveTo(p1); 
alert("p2.x: " + p2.x + " p2.y: " + p2.y); 

So what is the difference? It did not make sense to me. What Object are we adding functionality to? What is the difference if we created the functions as methods in the Point object? Why don't we do it using Prototype only?

2
  • 1
    Note that the first way lets you add methods to the prototype even after you create some objects with new Point(), and the new methods will be accessible to all instances. The second technique replaces the whole prototype object with a new object, which does not affect existing instances.
    – nnnnnn
    Oct 11, 2016 at 2:56
  • And you can use both as long as you defined the object first... foo.prototype = { ... }; foo.prototype.xxx = ...; Oct 11, 2016 at 3:20

2 Answers 2

4

Members bound to Prototype are shared across instances. There is only one instance of that member.

function Point(value) { this.value = value; }
Point.prototype.moveBy = function() { console.log('from the prototype', this.value);};
var p1 = new Point('p1');
var p2 = new Point('p2');
p1.moveBy === p2.moveBy; //true. Same instance of moveBy function

Members set directly to this inside the constructor or set to a specific instance of Point is available to that specific instance of Point only. If you want to expose logic shared across all instances of Point, it's best to set it on the Prototype.

var p3 = new Point('p3');
p3.moveBy = function() { console.log('from the instance', this.value); };
p3.moveBy === p2.moveBy; //false

var p4 = new Point('p4');
p4.moveBy = function() { console.log('from the instance', this.value) };
p4.moveBy === p3.moveBy; //false

The cool part is that you can always access the prototype even if you have declared it on the instance. If so, pass the instance as context:

Point.prototype.moveBy.call(p3); //will call moveBy set on the prototype. Output: "from the prototype p3"
p3.moveBy(); //will call moveBy set on the instance. Output: from the instance p3

The above snippet illustrates fundamental concepts of JavaScript (the context) and object-oriented JavaScript (prototype). If the subject is of interest to you, take a look at N. Zackas' book on the subject: https://www.amazon.com/Principles-Object-Oriented-JavaScript-Nicholas-Zakas/dp/1593275404

2

Well the difference is clear. With the first peace of code your are declaring new members for Point.prototype. However, in the second one, you are providing an entire implementantion for Point.prototype.

All objects in JavaScript are descended from Object; all objects inherit methods and properties from Object.prototype, although they may be overridden (except an Object with a null prototype, i.e. Object.create(null)). For example, other constructors' prototypes override the constructor property and provide their own toString() methods.

Changes to the Object prototype object are seen by all objects through prototype chaining, unless the properties and methods subject to those changes are overridden further along the prototype chain. This provides a very powerful although potentially dangerous mechanism to override or extend object behavior. Object.prototype on MDN

4
  • It still makes no sense to me. Where can I see the "extend functionality of existing objects"?
    – William
    Oct 11, 2016 at 3:01
  • There it is your "existing object": The Point, as every javascript object, Point has a prototype on it's members. The prototype is the class property that is applied on every Point's instances. So then, you can create methods that will be applied on all Point's instances. That's what it means by extending functionality of existing objects.
    – lenilsondc
    Oct 11, 2016 at 3:07
  • Why don't we create functions as methods at the first place in the Point object?
    – William
    Oct 11, 2016 at 3:09
  • There is no matter on it. You can choose whatever style you want. It's a matter of code readability in the end. And also, be aware to avoid overriding an existing prototype declaration as well.
    – lenilsondc
    Oct 11, 2016 at 3:12

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