7

I need to add borders to this "shape". It's kinda difficult because the shape is made with the after and before pseudo-elements. I can't find the right way.

What I need to achieve:

enter image description here

The code I have so far:

https://jsfiddle.net/jimmyadaro/xfcjfz3d/

#octagon {
    width: 300px;
    height: 200px;
    background: red;
    position: relative;
    -webkit-box-sizing: content-box;
    -moz-box-sizing: content-box;
    box-sizing: content-box;
    display: block;
}

#octagon:before,
#octagon:after {
    content: "";
    position: absolute;
    left: 0;
    right: 0;
}

#octagon:before {
    top: 0;
    border-bottom: 30px solid red;
    border-left: 30px solid #fff;
    border-right: 30px solid #fff;
}

#octagon:after {
    bottom: 0;
    border-top: 30px solid red;
    border-left: 30px solid #fff;
    border-right: 30px solid #fff;
}

<div id="octagon"></div>

I tried with shadows and outlines without success.

Thanks for reading.

Note: I'll use a solid background color, if that matters.

8
  • 2
    This link may help you stackoverflow.com/questions/34641588/… – Geeky Oct 11 '16 at 19:04
  • Thanks @geeky, I've seen that but looks like it's not scalable. I mean, it can't be 600x200px. At least in the way that I tried. – Jimmy Adaro Oct 11 '16 at 19:17
  • Related - stackoverflow.com/questions/34644437/… but SVG is optimal here. – Paulie_D Oct 11 '16 at 19:24
  • Hi, @paulie-d nice to see you here! (I've seen you around CSS-Tricks, where you helped me a couple times). I'm a little bit scared about the cross-browser support. I didn't try with SVG. The thing is, this shape is a container for other elements (text, images...), so I don't know if I can trust SVG. – Jimmy Adaro Oct 11 '16 at 19:32
  • If the solution does not involve SVG, the answers you will get are going to be pretty hacky. Like this. You should really consider using SVG for this like @Paulie_D already suggested. – Ricky Oct 11 '16 at 22:14
6

Here's my solution. No solid background color is required. This may or may not suit your actual use case.

JSFiddle

#octagon {
    display: flex;
    justify-content: center;
    align-items: center;
    
    width: 300px;
    height: 200px;
    overflow: hidden;
    position: relative;
}

#octagon:before,
#octagon:after {
    content: "";
    display: block;
    width: 300px;
    padding-top: 100%;
    position: absolute;
    top: 50%;
    left: 50%;
    transform: translate(-50%, -50%) rotate(45deg);
    z-index: -1;
}
#octagon:before {
    background: red;
}
#octagon:after {
    background:
        linear-gradient(
    		45deg,
	    	#0e0 calc(50% - 150px + 10px), transparent 0,
    		transparent calc(50% + 150px - 10px), #0e0 0%),
    	linear-gradient(
    		-45deg,
    		#0e0 calc(50% - 100px + 10px), transparent 0,
    		transparent calc(50% + 100px - 10px), #0e0 0);
    box-shadow: 0 0 0 10px #0e0 inset;
}
<div id="octagon">Hello World!</div>

4
  • Wow @darrylyeo thanks for your dedication! I really appreciate it! If I need a thinner border (like 2px), how can I change that? – Jimmy Adaro Oct 11 '16 at 22:05
  • Glad to help, I enjoyed the challenge! See the last rule set, #octagon:after. The diagonals are controlled by box-shadow and the remaining sides are controlled by the percentages in the linear-gradients. I sort of eyed it, but I'm sure there's a more mathematical way to compute those values (calc() would come in handy). – darrylyeo Oct 11 '16 at 22:49
  • Got it! You now have only to replace all instances of 10px. – darrylyeo Oct 11 '16 at 23:05
  • That's amazing! Thanks again Darryl, you rock! haha I tried to change the fixed values to a percentage (100% of n px container), but doesn't work as expected. The lateral "borders" doesn't show up. Also, looks like it can't auto-adjust to children elements height. jsfiddle.net/jimmyadaro/jrs7mxw1/4 – Jimmy Adaro Oct 12 '16 at 14:58
2

Well, this is the only way I could think of approaching it in pure CSS:

JSfiddle here: https://jsfiddle.net/xfcjfz3d/7/

body {
    background:#fff;
}

#octagon {
  position:relative;
	width: 300px;
	height: 200px;
	background: green;
	position: relative;
	-webkit-box-sizing: content-box;
	-moz-box-sizing: content-box;
	box-sizing: content-box;
	display: block;
}

#octagon:before,
#octagon:after {
	content: "";
	position: absolute;
	left: 0;
	right: 0;
}

#octagon:before {
	top: 0;
	border-bottom: 30px solid green;
	border-left: 30px solid #fff;
	border-right: 30px solid #fff;
}

#octagon:after {
	bottom: 0;
	border-top: 30px solid green;
	border-left: 30px solid #fff;
	border-right: 30px solid #fff;
}

.tall {
  position:absolute;
  background:red;
  width:230px;
  height:190px;
  left:35px;
  top:5px;
  z-index:1;
}

.wide {
  position:absolute;
  background:red;
  width:290px;
  height:130px;
  left:5px;
  top:35px;
  z-index:1;
}

.corner {
  position:absolute;
  background:red;
  width:45px;
  height:43px;
  
  z-index:1;
  transform: rotate(45deg);
}

.topleft {
  left:14px;
  top:14px;
}

.topright {
  //background:black;
  left:241px;
  top:13px;
}

.bottomleft {
  background:red;
  left:13px;
  top:143px;
}

.bottomright {
  background:red;
  left:241px;
  top:143px;
}
<div id="octagon">
  <div class="tall"></div>
  <div class="wide"></div>
  <div class="corner topleft"></div>
  <div class="corner topright"></div>
  <div class="corner bottomleft"></div>
  <div class="corner bottomright"></div>
</div>

2
  • Thanks, @varin Nice approach but doesn't seems scalable. Also, I need to add elements inside the shape (text, images, etc.). Anyway, thank you very much. – Jimmy Adaro Oct 11 '16 at 20:10
  • Hmm. This could be made scalable I think, by using different units. If you need elements inside you could always add another div inside with content and higher z-index. – Varin Oct 11 '16 at 20:14

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