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I am using AffineTransforms to rotate a volume. I am confused now by the sign of the rotation angle. For a right-hand system, when looking down an axis, say Z axis, rotating the XY plane counter-clockwise should be positive angles. I define a rotation matrix r = [0.0 -1. 0.0; 1.0 0.0 0.0; 0.0 0.0 1.0], which is to rotate along the Z axis 90 degree counter-clockwise. Indeed, r * [1 0 0]' gives [0 1 0]', which rotates X axis to Y axis.

Now I define a volume v.

3×3×3 Array{Float64,3}:
[:, :, 1] =
 0.0  0.0  0.0
 0.0  0.0  0.0
 0.0  0.0  0.0

[:, :, 2] =
 0.0  0.0  0.0
 1.0  0.0  0.0
 0.0  0.0  0.0

[:, :, 3] =
 0.0  0.0  0.0
 0.0  0.0  0.0
 0.0  0.0  0.0

then I define tfm = AffineTransform(r, vec([0 0 0]))) which is the same as tfm = tformrotate(vec([0 0 1]), π/2). then transform(v, tfm). The rotation center is the input array center. I got

3×3×3 Array{Float64,3}:
[:, :, 1] =
 0.0  0.0  0.0
 0.0  0.0  0.0
 0.0  0.0  0.0

[:, :, 2] =
 0.0  1.0  0.0
 0.0  0.0  0.0
 0.0  0.0  0.0

[:, :, 3] =
 0.0  0.0  0.0
 0.0  0.0  0.0
 0.0  0.0  0.0

This is surprising to me because the output is the 90 degree rotation along Z axis but clockwise. It seems to me that this is actually a -90 degree rotation. Could somebody point out what I did wrong? Thanks.

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1 Answer 1

5

Admittedly, this confused me too. Had to read the help for transform and TransformedArray again.

First, the print order of arrays is a bit confusing, with the first index shown in columns, but it is the X-axis, as the dimensions of v are x,y,z in this order.

In the original v, we have v[2,1,2] == 1.0. But, by default, transform uses the center of the array as origin, so 2,1,2 is relative to center (0,-1,0) i.e. a unit vector in the negative y-axis direction.

The array returned by transform has values which are evaluated at x,y,z by giving the value of the original v at tfm((x,y,z)) (see ?TransformedArray).

Specifically, we have transform(v,tfm)[1,2,2] is v[tfm((-1,0,0))] which is v[(0,-1,0)] (because rotating (-1,0,0) counterclockwise is (0,-1,0)) which is v[2,1,2] in the uncentered v indices. Finally, v[2,1,2] == 1.0 as was in the output in the question.

Coordinate transformation are always tricky, and it is easy to confuse transformations and their inverse.

Hope this helps.

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  • Thanks! @dan-getz. After reading your answer, I went back to read the help of transform and TransformedArray as well.
    – JHZ
    Oct 12, 2016 at 15:48
  • So transform actually returns an array that is before the rotation. That is the inverse of the transformation. To obtain the volume after the rotation or any transformation, I need to use the inverse of my transformation. Is that correct?
    – JHZ
    Oct 12, 2016 at 15:54
  • 2
    transform basically takes the standard coordinates of the points in the volume (1:3 x 1:3 x 1:3 in this case), applies tfm on them, and looks in v for the result. Thus, you get a matrix of the same size, but the tfm is applied on the result, so to apply a transform on the source, you need to use the inverse.
    – Dan Getz
    Oct 12, 2016 at 16:42

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