17

I have a data frame with multiple columns and I want to be able to isolate two of the columns and get the total amount of unique values... here's an example of what I mean:

Lets say i have a data frame df:

df<- data.frame(v1 = c(1, 2, 3, 2, "a"), v2 = c("a", 2 ,"b","b", 4))
df

  v1 v2
1  1  a
2  2  2
3  3  b
4  2  b
5  a  4

Now what Im trying to do is extract just the unique values over the two columns. So if i just used unique() for each column the out put would look like this:

> unique(df[,1])
[1] 1 2 3 a
> unique(df[,2])
[1] a 2 b 4

But this is no good as it only finds the unique values per column, whereas I need the total amount of unique values over the two columns! For instance, 'a' is repeated in both columns, but I only want it counted once. For an example output of what I need; imagine the columns V1 and V2 are placed on top of each other like so:

  V1_V2
1      1
2      2
3      3
4      2
5      a
6      a
7      2
8      b
9      b
10     4

The unique values of V1_V2 would be:

   V1_V2
1      1
2      2
3      3
5      a
8      b
10     4

Then I could just count the rows using nrow(). Any ideas how I'd achieve this?

2
  • 6
    unique(unlist(df))? But beware of the coercion that will take place when you mix types like this.
    – joran
    Commented Oct 12, 2016 at 15:56
  • 1
    unique(c(df[,1],df[,2] ))
    – dww
    Commented Oct 12, 2016 at 15:56

5 Answers 5

15

With this approach, you can obtain the unique values does not matter how many columns you have:

df2 <- as.vector(as.matrix(df))
unique(df2)

And then, just use length.

14

This is well suited for union:

data.frame(V1_V2=union(df$v1, df$v2))

#  V1_V2
#1     1
#2     2
#3     3
#4     a
#5     b
#6     4
1
  • 2
    This is exactly what I was trying to do... I must have had about 15 lines of code trying to do what you achieved in 1... thanks!
    – Electrino
    Commented Oct 12, 2016 at 16:17
2

Try this:

unique(c(df[,1], df[,2]))
0

A generic approach:

uq_elem=c()
for(i in 1:ncol(df))
{
  uq_elem=c(unique(df[,i]), uq_elem)
  uq_elem=unique(uq_elem)
}

All the different elements will be at: uq_elem

1
  • 2
    While this code snippet may solve the question, including an explanation really helps to improve the quality of your post. Remember that you are answering the question for readers in the future, and those people might not know the reasons for your code suggestion.
    – 31piy
    Commented Aug 18, 2018 at 5:20
0

library(dplyr)

df %>% distinct(v1, .keep_all=TRUE)

1
  • 1
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    – Community Bot
    Commented Jun 28, 2023 at 7:33

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