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In C++17 std::optional is introduced, I was happy about this decision, until I looked at the ref. I know Optional/Maybe from Scala, Haskell and Java 8, where optional is a monad and follows monadic laws. This is not the case in the C++17 implementation. How am I supposed to use std::optional, whithout functions like map and flatMap/bind, whats the advantage using a std::optional vs for example returning -1, or a nullptr from a function if it fails to compute a result? And more important for me, why wasn't std::optional designed to be a monad, is there a reason?

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    C++ is not Haskell. – Kerrek SB Oct 12 '16 at 16:05
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    What if -1 is a valid return value already? – Kerrek SB Oct 12 '16 at 16:06
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    If you return a int and return -1 as failure that means -1 cold never be a valid output for the input. Most of the time you cannot do that. As far as usage goes you shoud consult a reference – NathanOliver Oct 12 '16 at 16:06
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    You cannot return nullptr from a function whose return type is int. – Kerrek SB Oct 12 '16 at 16:08
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    "but the optional type clearly comes from functional programming" That may be the source of your confusion. – juanchopanza Oct 12 '16 at 16:13
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How am I supposed to use std::optional, whithout functions like map and flatMap/bind

Maybe in Haskell is perfectly usable without fmap, it represents a value that may or may not be there. It also brings to the type system the distinction so you need to handle both cases.

whats the advantage using a std::optional vs for example returning -1, or a nullptr from a function if it fails to compute a result?

How do you know what the error condition is? Is it 0, -1, MAX_INT, nullptr or something else? If I have both a unsigned int and int return value and the int version previously returned -1 should you change them both to MAX_INT or make them return different values? std::optional avoids the problem.

And more important for me, why wasn't std::optional designed to be a monad, is there a reason?

Does C++ have monads at the moment? Until a different abstraction than the container one there isn't really a way to add that functionality.

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    I'd say that C++ does have monads in it (optional<T> and vector<T> for instance). What it lacks is nice syntax for doing monadic operations on them, but it can still be useful to think of them as monads. – toth Oct 12 '16 at 16:27
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There is P0798r0 proposal with exactly this, and the associated implementation here on Github. The proposal also refers to general monadic interface proposal, and similarly usable std::expected. Implementations of those are also available.

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You can define bind and return over std::optional, so in that sense it is still a Monad.

For instance, a possible bind

template<typename T1, typename T2>
std::optional<T2> bind(std::optional<T1> a, std::function< std::optional<T2>(T1)> f) {
   if(a.has_value()) return f(a.value());
   return std::optional<T2>{};
 }

It is actually probably useful to define this.

As to why the standard library does not ship with this, or something like this, I think the answer is one of preferred style in the language.

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    This won't work. You want something along the lines of template<typename T1, typename F> auto bind(std::optional<T1> a, F f) -> std::optional<std::decay_t<decltype(f(*a))>>; – T.C. Oct 12 '16 at 20:01
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    @T.C., it is true that in my version the compiler cannot deduce T2, so you have to specify it whenever you invoke bind, but I'd say that still counts as working. I agree than in practice your version is superior since it does type deduction and is more efficient (no need to use std::function if you don't want to), but at least to me it's harder to tell what the type of f is supposed to be from looking at the declaration. – toth Oct 12 '16 at 20:33
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    @T.C., also I believe you don't want the std::optional on your trailing return type. The f in bind should return a std::optional, your type signature would be the right one for fmap. – toth Oct 12 '16 at 20:35
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    Good point on the second. That's a mistype. (If you want explicitly specified parameters, at least swap your template parameter order and wrap the second function parameter's type in a non-deduced context so that T1 can still be deduced.) – T.C. Oct 12 '16 at 20:37

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