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Say the following stuff pass

#include <iostream>

class Nand{
  public :
  bool A;
  bool B;
  bool s() const;
};

bool Nand::s() const {
  return (!(A&&B));
};

int main()
{
  std::cout << std::boolalpha;

  Nand Nand_1;
  Nand_1.A = true;
  Nand_1.B=false;
  bool Y = Nand_1.s();

  std::cout << "Input A of Nand_1 is equivalent to  : " << Nand_1.A << std::endl;
  std::cout << "Input B of Nand_1 is equivalent to  : " << Nand_1.B << std::endl;
  std::cout << "Output Y of Nand_1 is equivalent to  : " << Y << std::endl;

  return 0;
}

and this one too

#include <iostream>

class Nand{
  public :
  bool s(bool iA, bool iB) const;
};

bool Nand::s(bool iA, bool iB) const {
  return (!(iA&&iB));
};

int main()
{
  std::cout << std::boolalpha;

  Nand Nand_1;
  bool Y = Nand_1.s(true, false);

  //std::cout << "Input A of Nand_1 is equivalent to  : " << Nand_1.A << std::endl;
  //std::cout << "Input B of Nand_1 is equivalent to  : " << Nand_1.B << std::endl;
  std::cout << "Output Y of Nand_1 is equivalent to  : " << Y << std::endl;

  return 0;
}

Sboxes are made by simple 2-input Nand connected together. I want to template the Nand class in order to generate complex Sboxes. In fact the () function is showed with two inputs in this snippet. I manage arrays input of at least 128 bits.

Fisrt stuff is not well written. The second one permits linking in between, but doesn't permirt to show inputs of s !

How can I read s parameters in the second stuff ? I can with the first snipppet, but I think it is not well written (in order to template later).

That rocks me :(

5
  • BTW, why are you putting ; after each function definition? I guess your compiler also gives warning like a warning: extra ';' Oct 12 '16 at 20:12
  • No message like your. Are you talking about the line return (!(iA&&iB)); ? Oct 12 '16 at 20:17
  • What issues are you having and what specifically are you trying to ask? Oct 12 '16 at 20:18
  • The issue I have is the first way is not easy to use if I want to template Nand class. Because I have no parameter for s(). I ask how to use the second way, with the abality to read the value the parameters s has. In the second way, input parameters will be output parameters of instance n-1. I'm not clear in English, I apologize a lot. Say, I need to uncomment the two first std::cout with the abilty to ask parameters of s(). Say, iA, iB. Oct 12 '16 at 20:21
  • Moved to C without OOP since a while. Each NAND function call subfunction to export what I need. Closed unanswered. Aug 16 '17 at 8:13
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OOP is entirely unnecessary for this task. You can use bitwise operators, which already do what you are asking to do. And, to store complicated bits you can use hexidecimals with integer types.

unsigned short int a = 0xa; // 00001010b
unsigned short int b = 0xd; // 00001101b
// unsigned short int c,d,e,...

std::cout << std::hex << (a & b) << std::endl; // AND
std::cout << std::hex << (a | b) << std::endl; // OR
std::cout << std::hex << (a ^ b) << std::endl; // XOR

std::cout << std::hex << (~a) << std::endl; // NOT
std::cout << std::hex << (~b) << std::endl; // NOT
std::cout << std::hex << ~(a & b) << std::endl; // XAND

//std::cout << std::hex << ~(c & d & e/* & ..*/) << std::endl; // complicated XAND

You can use as many variables in the gate as you want, because the compiler returns it as an expression to be evaluated in the next expression. For details on what these operators do, and expressions look at the man pages for your specific compiler.

If you need more bits, look into how to implement 64-bits on your system (if possible), because systems are not any higher than 64-bit. You can use arrays if you require more.

unsigned long long int x[2] = {0xffff,0xffff}; // this assignment depends on your compiler

#include <stdint.h>

int64_t x[2] = {0xffff,0xffff}; // guaranteed 64-bit as of C99

GNU C Compiler Specifications

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  • Thank you Jordan. I clearly need OOP. Because I really do not need the result to be good. The Nand operator, once schematized correctly with a rapid calculus has to show when it is called, by which mother functions etc ... I'm not trying to create a function, I need to monitor a non-classic way how functions are interconnected. Aug 16 '17 at 8:12
  • I'm glad to help despite the ludicrous downvote from someone. Sep 4 '17 at 5:14
  • Program done and working. Once defined, I implemented the next() -pythonnic equivalent in C. Now, able to "clock" the function, hence, detect and show where and when it's activated. Ideas taken form HDL synths. Dec 24 '18 at 7:55

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