53

I am designing an app in electron, so I have access to CSS variables. I have defined a color variable in vars.css:

:root {
  --color: #f0f0f0;
}

I want to use this color in main.css, but with some opacity applied:

#element {
  background: (somehow use var(--color) at some opacity);
}

How would I go about doing this? I am not using any preprocesser, only CSS. I would prefer an all-CSS answer, but I will accept JavaScript/jQuery.

I cannot use opacity because I am using a background image that should not be transparent.

  • So sounds like you should be using more than one element.... – epascarello Oct 13 '16 at 1:01
  • I would prefer not to, but it seems I might have to... :( – JoshyRobot Oct 13 '16 at 1:02
94

You can't take an existing color value and apply an alpha channel to it. Namely, you can't take an existing hex value such as #f0f0f0, give it an alpha component and use the resulting value with another property.

However, custom properties allow you to convert your hex value into an RGB triplet for use with rgba(), store that value in the custom property (including the commas!), substitute that value using var() into an rgba() function with your desired alpha value, and it'll just work:

:root {
  /* #f0f0f0 in decimal RGB */
  --color: 240, 240, 240;
}

body {
  color: #000;
  background-color: #000;
}

#element {
  background-color: rgba(var(--color), 0.5);
}
<p id="element">If you can see this, your browser supports custom properties.</p>

This seems almost too good to be true.1 How does it work?

The magic lies in the fact that the values of custom properties are substituted as is when replacing var() references in a property value, before that property's value is computed. This means that as far as custom properties are concerned, the value of --color in your example isn't a color value at all until a var(--color) expression appears somewhere that expects a color value (and only in that context). From section 2.1 of the css-variables spec:

The allowed syntax for custom properties is extremely permissive. The <declaration-value> production matches any sequence of one or more tokens, so long as the sequence does not contain <bad-string-token>, <bad-url-token>, unmatched <)-token>, <]-token>, or <}-token>, or top-level <semicolon-token> tokens or <delim-token> tokens with a value of "!".

For example, the following is a valid custom property:

--foo: if(x > 5) this.width = 10;

While this value is obviously useless as a variable, as it would be invalid in any normal property, it might be read and acted on by JavaScript.

And section 3:

If a property contains one or more var() functions, and those functions are syntactically valid, the entire property’s grammar must be assumed to be valid at parse time. It is only syntax-checked at computed-value time, after var() functions have been substituted.

This means that the 240, 240, 240 value you see above gets substituted directly into the rgba() function before the declaration is computed. So this:

#element {
  background-color: rgba(var(--color), 0.5);
}

which doesn't appear to be valid CSS at first because rgba() expects no less than four comma-separated numeric values, becomes this:

#element {
  background-color: rgba(240, 240, 240, 0.5);
}

which, of course, is perfectly valid CSS.

Taking it one step further, you can store the alpha component in its own custom property:

:root {
  --color: 240, 240, 240;
  --alpha: 0.5;
}

and substitute it, with the same result:

#element {
  background-color: rgba(var(--color), var(--alpha));
}

This allows you to have different alpha values that you can swap around on-the-fly.


1 Well, it is, if you're running the code snippet in a browser that doesn't support custom properties.

  • 7
    This is beautiful – Roberrrt Dec 21 '16 at 14:43
  • 1
    @Roberrrt: It's something I should have realized early on, in fact, seeing as I posted these answers previously. – BoltClock Dec 21 '16 at 14:48
  • 1
    @Roberrrt Of course! – Zach Saucier Dec 21 '16 at 14:49
  • 1
    If we're going this var, why not use something like: .element2 { background-color: rgba(var(--red), var(--low-opacity); }. This way you can fully utilise the usage of variables :). – Roberrrt Dec 21 '16 at 14:51
  • 1
    Indeed - codepen.io/Paulie-D/pen/LbawWR – Paulie_D Dec 21 '16 at 16:30
7

I know the OP isn't using a preprocessor, but I would have been helped if the following information was part of the answer here (I can't comment yet, otherwise I would have commented @BoltClock answer.

If you are using, e.g. scss, the answer above will fail, because scss attempts to compile the styles with a scss-specific rgba()/hsla() function, which requires 4 parameters. However, rgba()/hsla() are also native css functions, so you can use string interpolation to bypass the scss function.

Example (valid in sass 3.5.0+):

:root {
    --color_rgb: 250, 250, 250;
    --color_hsl: 250, 50%, 50%;
}

div {
    /* This is valid CSS, but will fail in a scss compilation */
    background-color: rgba(var(--color_rgb), 0.5);
    
    /* This is valid scss, and will generate the CSS above */
    background-color: #{'rgba(var(--color_rgb), 0.5)'};
}
<div></div>

Note that string interpolation will not work for non-CSS scss functions, such as lighten(), because the resulting code would not be functional CSS. It would still be valid scss though, so you would receive no error in compilation.

  • 1
    If you prefer to use native CSS color functions in your Sass .scss files, you can include the following function definitions at the top of your file to override Sass' handling and make them pass through: @function rgb($args...) { @return #{'rgb(#{$args})'}; } @function rgba($args...) { @return #{'rgba(#{$args})'}; } @function hsl($args...) { @return #{'hsl(#{$args})'}; } @function hsla($args...) { @return #{'hsla(#{$args})'}; } ```` – lunelson Oct 16 '18 at 11:32
1

This is indeed possible with CSS. It's just a bit dirty, and you'll have to use gradients. I've coded a small snippet as example, take note that for dark backgrounds, you should use the black opacity, as for light- the white ones.:

:root {
  --red: rgba(255, 0, 0, 1);
  --white-low-opacity: rgba(255, 255, 255, .3);
  --white-high-opacity: rgba(255, 255, 255, .7);
  --black-low-opacity: rgba(0, 0, 0, .3);
  --black-high-opacity: rgba(0, 0, 0, .7);
}

div {
	width: 100px;
	height: 100px;
	margin: 10px;
}
    
    
.element1 {
	background: 
        linear-gradient(var(--white-low-opacity), var(--white-low-opacity)) no-repeat,
	linear-gradient(var(--red), var(--red)) no-repeat;
}

.element2 {
	background: 
        linear-gradient(var(--white-high-opacity), var(--white-high-opacity)) no-repeat,
	linear-gradient(var(--red), var(--red)) no-repeat;
}
    
.element3 {
	background: 
        linear-gradient(var(--black-low-opacity), var(--black-low-opacity)) no-repeat,
	linear-gradient(var(--red), var(--red)) no-repeat;
}

.element4 {
	background: 
        linear-gradient(var(--black-high-opacity), var(--black-high-opacity)) no-repeat,
	linear-gradient(var(--red), var(--red)) no-repeat;
}
<div class="element1">hello world</div>
<div class="element2">hello world</div>
<div class="element3">hello world</div>
<div class="element4">hello world</div>

  • You do not need to specify background-size - gradients have no intrinsic size and will automatically stretch as a result. – BoltClock Dec 21 '16 at 13:50
  • @BoltClock Yeah, I literally thought of that when I posted it, it was just a bit of playing around in the codepen ;). Cleaned up now, thanks! – Roberrrt Dec 21 '16 at 13:51
  • This is clever, I had not thought of layering solid-color gradients over one another when I answered a similar question last year. This question is probably more general anyway the way it was written, the one I answered was for a very specific use case. – BoltClock Dec 21 '16 at 13:53
  • 1
    That's also true. I wonder if I should move my answer here. – BoltClock Dec 21 '16 at 13:55
  • 1
    I just discovered something else that's pretty incredible. I've now posted an answer. – BoltClock Dec 21 '16 at 14:39
1
:root{
--color: 255, 0, 0;
}

#element{
    background-color: rgba(var(--color), opacity);
}

where you replace opacity with anything between 0 and 1

  • Is this an attempt at answering the question? Because if so, the code doesn't really make sense. Particularly the rgba(var(--color), opacity) bit. Especially since your custom property value is the entire rgb() notation. But also because of the "opacity" keyword. – BoltClock Dec 22 '16 at 14:45
  • woops my bad the rgb parts should not be in the var – Pizza lord Dec 22 '16 at 14:54
0

You can set specific variable/value for each color - the original and the one with opacity:

:root {
  --color: #F00;
  --color-opacity: rgba(255, 0, 0, 0.5);
}
#a1 {
  background: var(--color);
} 
#a2 {
  background: var(--color-opacity);
}
<div id="a1">asdf</div>
<div id="a2">asdf</div>

If you can't use this and you are ok with javascript solution, you can use this one:

$(function() {
  $('button').click(function() {
    bgcolor = $('#a2').css('backgroundColor');
    rgb_value = bgcolor.match(/\d+,\s?\d+,\s?\d+/)[0]
    $('#a2').css('backgroundColor', 'rgba(' + rgb_value + ', 0.5)');
  });
});
:root {
  --color: #F00;
}
#a1 {
  background: var(--color);
} 
#a2 {
  background: var(--color);
}
<script src="https://ajax.googleapis.com/ajax/libs/jquery/2.1.1/jquery.min.js"></script>
<div id="a1">asdf</div>
<div id="a2">asdf</div>
<button>Click to change opacity</button>

  • The opacity value will change, so it would be annoying to create a variable for every opacity. – JoshyRobot Oct 13 '16 at 1:00
  • Check the update for the js solution – Dekel Oct 13 '16 at 1:04
-1

In CSS you should be able to either use rgba values:

#element {
  background: rgba(240, 240, 240, 0.5);
}

or just set the opacity:

#element {
  background: #f0f0f0;
  opacity: 0.5;    
}
  • I am unable to hardcode an rgba value, I am using color variables. I should have mentioned I cannot use opacity because I will have a background image that should not be transparent. – JoshyRobot Oct 13 '16 at 0:58
-1

If you love hex colors like me there is another solution. The hex value is 6 digits after that is the alpha value. 00 is 100% transparency 99 is about 75% then it uses the alphabet 'a1-af' then 'b1-bf' ending with 'ff' which is 100% opaque.

:root {
--color: #F00;
}

#element {
background: var(--color)f6;
}
  • Unfortunately, I don't think this works. 8 digit hex code support is starting to spread, but it doesn't look like the trick used with the accepted answer works with them. Example: jsbin.com/nacuharige/edit?css,output – JoshyRobot Aug 25 '18 at 23:43

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