171

I am designing an app in electron, so I have access to CSS variables. I have defined a color variable in vars.css:

:root {
  --color: #f0f0f0;
}

I want to use this color in main.css, but with some opacity applied:

#element {
  background: (somehow use var(--color) at some opacity);
}

How would I go about doing this? I am not using any preprocessor, only CSS. I would prefer an all-CSS answer, but I will accept JavaScript/jQuery.

I cannot use opacity because I am using a background image that should not be transparent.

  • So sounds like you should be using more than one element.... – epascarello Oct 13 '16 at 1:01
  • I would prefer not to, but it seems I might have to... :( – JoshyRobot Oct 13 '16 at 1:02
  • 11
    AHHHHH!!!!! This is so annoying! It's almost 2020 now. Color picker gets #hex colors. alpha / rgba doesn't work in Sass/Stylus - because it's not a rgb value. Should I put 4 sliders in my CMS for every single color? – sheriffderek Sep 5 '19 at 20:17

11 Answers 11

289

You can't take an existing color value and apply an alpha channel to it. Namely, you can't take an existing hex value such as #f0f0f0, give it an alpha component and use the resulting value with another property.

However, custom properties allow you to convert your hex value into an RGB triplet for use with rgba(), store that value in the custom property (including the commas!), substitute that value using var() into an rgba() function with your desired alpha value, and it'll just work:

:root {
  /* #f0f0f0 in decimal RGB */
  --color: 240, 240, 240;
}

body {
  color: #000;
  background-color: #000;
}

#element {
  background-color: rgba(var(--color), 0.8);
}
<p id="element">If you can see this, your browser supports custom properties.</p>

This seems almost too good to be true.1 How does it work?

The magic lies in the fact that the values of custom properties are substituted as is when replacing var() references in a property value, before that property's value is computed. This means that as far as custom properties are concerned, the value of --color in your example isn't a color value at all until a var(--color) expression appears somewhere that expects a color value (and only in that context). From section 2.1 of the css-variables spec:

The allowed syntax for custom properties is extremely permissive. The <declaration-value> production matches any sequence of one or more tokens, so long as the sequence does not contain <bad-string-token>, <bad-url-token>, unmatched <)-token>, <]-token>, or <}-token>, or top-level <semicolon-token> tokens or <delim-token> tokens with a value of "!".

For example, the following is a valid custom property:

--foo: if(x > 5) this.width = 10;

While this value is obviously useless as a variable, as it would be invalid in any normal property, it might be read and acted on by JavaScript.

And section 3:

If a property contains one or more var() functions, and those functions are syntactically valid, the entire property’s grammar must be assumed to be valid at parse time. It is only syntax-checked at computed-value time, after var() functions have been substituted.

This means that the 240, 240, 240 value you see above gets substituted directly into the rgba() function before the declaration is computed. So this:

#element {
  background-color: rgba(var(--color), 0.8);
}

which doesn't appear to be valid CSS at first because rgba() expects no less than four comma-separated numeric values, becomes this:

#element {
  background-color: rgba(240, 240, 240, 0.8);
}

which, of course, is perfectly valid CSS.

Taking it one step further, you can store the alpha component in its own custom property:

:root {
  --color: 240, 240, 240;
  --alpha: 0.8;
}

and substitute it, with the same result:

#element {
  background-color: rgba(var(--color), var(--alpha));
}

This allows you to have different alpha values that you can swap around on-the-fly.


1 Well, it is, if you're running the code snippet in a browser that doesn't support custom properties.

| improve this answer | |
  • 16
    This is beautiful – roberrrt-s Dec 21 '16 at 14:43
  • 2
    @Roberrrt: It's something I should have realized early on, in fact, seeing as I posted these answers previously. – BoltClock Dec 21 '16 at 14:48
  • 8
    Unfortunately, the value "240, 240, 240" is not editable with a color picker. That is a huge miss when you need to find the right colors for your GUI. – GetFree Sep 16 '17 at 7:43
  • 3
    @s3c The syntax var(--hex-color)99 is converted to two tokens #333333 99 (notice the space to separate tokens) which obviously is not the thing you want. Custom properties were originally defined to copy tokens, not strings and this is the end result. It's way too late to fix this now. – Mikko Rantalainen Feb 19 at 6:43
  • 6
    @s3c: The good news is that CSS Color 5 is introducing some cool new functions to manipulate existing hex values, including changing their alpha channel: drafts.csswg.org/css-color-5/#colormodify – BoltClock Mar 10 at 3:17
21

I know the OP isn't using a preprocessor, but I would have been helped if the following information was part of the answer here (I can't comment yet, otherwise I would have commented @BoltClock answer.

If you are using, e.g. scss, the answer above will fail, because scss attempts to compile the styles with a scss-specific rgba()/hsla() function, which requires 4 parameters. However, rgba()/hsla() are also native css functions, so you can use string interpolation to bypass the scss function.

Example (valid in sass 3.5.0+):

:root {
    --color_rgb: 250, 250, 250;
    --color_hsl: 250, 50%, 50%;
}

div {
    /* This is valid CSS, but will fail in a scss compilation */
    background-color: rgba(var(--color_rgb), 0.5);
    
    /* This is valid scss, and will generate the CSS above */
    background-color: #{'rgba(var(--color_rgb), 0.5)'};
}
<div></div>

Note that string interpolation will not work for non-CSS scss functions, such as lighten(), because the resulting code would not be functional CSS. It would still be valid scss though, so you would receive no error in compilation.

| improve this answer | |
  • 4
    If you prefer to use native CSS color functions in your Sass .scss files, you can include the following function definitions at the top of your file to override Sass' handling and make them pass through: @function rgb($args...) { @return #{'rgb(#{$args})'}; } @function rgba($args...) { @return #{'rgba(#{$args})'}; } @function hsl($args...) { @return #{'hsl(#{$args})'}; } @function hsla($args...) { @return #{'hsla(#{$args})'}; } ```` – lunelson Oct 16 '18 at 11:32
  • rgba is a synonym for rgb for quite some time now.. You are hence allowed to drop the "a". – s3c Feb 19 at 8:14
  • 2
    Another workaround for scss files is to use uppercase (RGB) which is then ignored by sass. Eg: color: RGB(var(--color_rgb), 0.5);. From GitHub – Jono Job Apr 17 at 2:35
  • Nice answer! If you have already defined the colors in hex, you can simply add this code to convert it to the custom rgb properties: :root { @each $color, $value in $colors { --#{$color}_rgb: #{red($value), green($value), blue($value)}; } } – Torsten Kolb Jul 31 at 10:38
13

I was in a similar situation, but unfortunately the given solutions did not work for me, as the variables could be anything from rgb to hsl to hex or even color names.
I solved this issue now, by applying the background-color and the opacity to a pseudo :after or :before element:

.container {
    position: relative;
}

.container::before {
    content: "";
    width: 100%;
    height: 100%;
    position: absolute;
    left: 0;
    background-color: var(--color);
    opacity: 0.3;
}

The styles might need to be changed a little, depending on the element the background should be applied to.
Also it might not work for all situations, but hopefully it helps in some cases, where the other solutions can't be used.

Edit: I just noticed, that this solution obviously also impacts the text color, as it creates an element in front of the target element and applies a transparent background color to it.
This might be a problem in some cases.

| improve this answer | |
  • This not only has the advantage of allowing more flexible specification of the color (e.g., a name, or rgb or HSL) but also avoids any conflict between native CSS color functions and Sass's color functions. See SimplyPhy's answer below. – Jim Ratliff Sep 6 '19 at 7:34
  • 1
    I think it's better to use :before so you get the right stacking order without playing with z-index. – Mikko Rantalainen Feb 19 at 6:46
5

This is indeed possible with CSS. It's just a bit dirty, and you'll have to use gradients. I've coded a small snippet as example, take note that for dark backgrounds, you should use the black opacity, as for light- the white ones.:

:root {
  --red: rgba(255, 0, 0, 1);
  --white-low-opacity: rgba(255, 255, 255, .3);
  --white-high-opacity: rgba(255, 255, 255, .7);
  --black-low-opacity: rgba(0, 0, 0, .3);
  --black-high-opacity: rgba(0, 0, 0, .7);
}

div {
	width: 100px;
	height: 100px;
	margin: 10px;
}
    
    
.element1 {
	background: 
        linear-gradient(var(--white-low-opacity), var(--white-low-opacity)) no-repeat,
	linear-gradient(var(--red), var(--red)) no-repeat;
}

.element2 {
	background: 
        linear-gradient(var(--white-high-opacity), var(--white-high-opacity)) no-repeat,
	linear-gradient(var(--red), var(--red)) no-repeat;
}
    
.element3 {
	background: 
        linear-gradient(var(--black-low-opacity), var(--black-low-opacity)) no-repeat,
	linear-gradient(var(--red), var(--red)) no-repeat;
}

.element4 {
	background: 
        linear-gradient(var(--black-high-opacity), var(--black-high-opacity)) no-repeat,
	linear-gradient(var(--red), var(--red)) no-repeat;
}
<div class="element1">hello world</div>
<div class="element2">hello world</div>
<div class="element3">hello world</div>
<div class="element4">hello world</div>

| improve this answer | |
  • You do not need to specify background-size - gradients have no intrinsic size and will automatically stretch as a result. – BoltClock Dec 21 '16 at 13:50
  • @BoltClock Yeah, I literally thought of that when I posted it, it was just a bit of playing around in the codepen ;). Cleaned up now, thanks! – roberrrt-s Dec 21 '16 at 13:51
  • This is clever, I had not thought of layering solid-color gradients over one another when I answered a similar question last year. This question is probably more general anyway the way it was written, the one I answered was for a very specific use case. – BoltClock Dec 21 '16 at 13:53
  • It doesn't really work when the backgrounds are different though, I now assume a white background (255,255,255) when applying the 'opacity'. It could possibly be defaulted to OP's main background color. But then again, white background will probably fit the need of most lighter colors to the extend that people will not notice this. – roberrrt-s Dec 21 '16 at 13:54
  • 1
    I just discovered something else that's pretty incredible. I've now posted an answer. – BoltClock Dec 21 '16 at 14:39
2

SCSS / SASS

Advantage: You can just use Hex color values, instead to use the 8 Bit for every channel (0-255).

This is how I did it with the initial idea of: https://codyhouse.co/blog/post/how-to-combine-sass-color-functions-and-css-variables

Edit: You could also modify the alpha function to just use #{$color-name}-rgb and omit the generated *-r, *-g, *-b CSS variables.


Result

body {
  --main-color: rgb(170, 68, 204);
  --main-color-rgb: 170,68,204;
  --main-color-r: 170;
  --main-color-g: 68;
  --main-color-b: 204;
}

.button-test {
  // Generated from the alpha function
  color: rgba(var(--main-color-r), var(--main-color-g), var(--main-color-b), 0.5);
  // OR (you wrote this yourself, see usage)
  color: rgba(var(--main-color-rgb), 0.5);
}

Usage:

body {
    @include defineColorRGB(--main-color, #aa44cc);
}

.button-test {
  // With alpha function:
  color: alpha(var(--main-color), 0.5);
  // OR just using the generated variable directly
  color: rgba(var(--main-color-rgb), 0.5);
}

Mixin and functions

@mixin defineColorRGB($color-name, $value) {
    $red: red($value);
    $green: green($value);
    $blue: blue($value);
    #{$color-name}: unquote("rgb(#{$red}, #{$green}, #{$blue})");
    #{$color-name}-rgb: $red,$green,$blue;
    #{$color-name}-r: $red;
    #{$color-name}-g: $green;
    #{$color-name}-b: $blue;
}

// replace substring with another string
// credits: https://css-tricks.com/snippets/sass/str-replace-function/
@function str-replace($string, $search, $replace: '') {
    $index: str-index($string, $search);
    @if $index {
        @return str-slice($string, 1, $index - 1) + $replace + str-replace(str-slice($string, $index + str-length($search)), $search, $replace);
    }
    @return $string;
}

@function alpha($color, $opacity) {
    $color: str-replace($color, 'var(');
    $color: str-replace($color, ')');
    $color-r: var(#{$color+'-r'});
    $color-g: var(#{$color+'-g'});
    $color-b: var(#{$color+'-b'});
    @return rgba($color-r, $color-g, $color-b, $opacity);
}

Hopefully this will save someone some time.

| improve this answer | |
  • 1
    I like this approach. Thanks – tonygatta Jan 31 at 10:48
1
:root{
--color: 255, 0, 0;
}

#element{
    background-color: rgba(var(--color), opacity);
}

where you replace opacity with anything between 0 and 1

| improve this answer | |
  • Is this an attempt at answering the question? Because if so, the code doesn't really make sense. Particularly the rgba(var(--color), opacity) bit. Especially since your custom property value is the entire rgb() notation. But also because of the "opacity" keyword. – BoltClock Dec 22 '16 at 14:45
  • woops my bad the rgb parts should not be in the var – Pizza lord Dec 22 '16 at 14:54
0

If you use dark and light mode, i use this sample. I prefer separate between colors and rgb colors variable assignment. So i use two each loop. I realise this solution is not dry code. If you want to dry code could you use one loop.

$colors-light: (
  white: #fff,
  black: #0c0d0e,
  orange: #f48024,
  green: #5eba7d,
  blue: #0077cc,
  red: #d1383d,
  red-100: #e2474c,
  red-200: red,
);

$colors-dark: (
  black: #fff,
  white: #2d2d2d,
  orange: #dd7118,
  green: #5eba7d,
  blue: #0077cc,
  red: #aa1c21,
  red-100: #c9292e,
  red-200: red,
);

@function hexToRGB($hex) {
  @return red($hex), green($hex), blue($hex);
}

@mixin generate_colors($colors) {
  // Colors
  @each $color, $value in $colors {
    @if str-slice(#{$value}, 1, 1) == "#" {
      --#{$color}: #{$value};
    } @else {
      --#{$color}: var(--#{$value});
    }
  }

  // RGB Colors
  @each $color, $value in $colors {
    @if str-slice(#{$value}, 1, 1) == "#" {
      --RGB_#{$color}: #{hexToRGB($value)};
    } @else {
      --RGB_#{$color}: var(--RGB_#{$value});
    }
  }
}

:root {
  @include generate_colors($colors-light);
}

[data-theme="dark"] {
  @include generate_colors($colors-dark);
}

dry code

@mixin generate_colors($colors) {
  // Colors, RGB Colors
  @each $color, $value in $colors {
    @if str-slice(#{$value}, 1, 1) == "#" {
      --#{$color}: #{$value};
      --RGB_#{$color}: #{hexToRGB($value)};
    } @else {
      --#{$color}: var(--#{$value});
      --RGB_#{$color}: var(--RGB_#{$value});
    }
  }
}

css Output

:root {
  --white: #fff;
  --RGB_white: 255, 255, 255;
  --black: #0c0d0e;
  --RGB_black: 12, 13, 14;
  --orange: #f48024;
  --RGB_orange: 244, 128, 36;
  --green: #5eba7d;
  --RGB_green: 94, 186, 125;
  --blue: #0077cc;
  --RGB_blue: 0, 119, 204;
  --red: #d1383d;
  --RGB_red: 209, 56, 61;
  --red-100: #e2474c;
  --RGB_red-100: 226, 71, 76;
  --red-200: var(--red);
  --RGB_red-200: var(--RGB_red);
}

[data-theme="dark"] {
  --black: #fff;
  --RGB_black: 255, 255, 255;
  --white: #2d2d2d;
  --RGB_white: 45, 45, 45;
  --orange: #dd7118;
  --RGB_orange: 221, 113, 24;
  --green: #5eba7d;
  --RGB_green: 94, 186, 125;
  --blue: #0077cc;
  --RGB_blue: 0, 119, 204;
  --red: #aa1c21;
  --RGB_red: 170, 28, 33;
  --red-100: #c9292e;
  --RGB_red-100: 201, 41, 46;
  --red-200: var(--red);
  --RGB_red-200: var(--RGB_red);
}

body {
  background-color: var(--white);
}

.colors {
  display: -webkit-box;
  display: -ms-flexbox;
  display: flex;
  -webkit-box-orient: horizontal;
  -webkit-box-direction: normal;
      -ms-flex-direction: row;
          flex-direction: row;
  -ms-flex-wrap: wrap;
      flex-wrap: wrap;
  -webkit-box-pack: start;
      -ms-flex-pack: start;
          justify-content: flex-start;
  -webkit-box-align: center;
      -ms-flex-align: center;
          align-items: center;
  margin: 50px 0 0 30px;
}

.box {
  width: 100px;
  height: 100px;
  margin-right: 5px;
}

.black {
  background-color: var(--black);
}

.white {
  background-color: var(--white);
}

.orange {
  background-color: var(--orange);
}

.green {
  background-color: var(--green);
}

.blue {
  background-color: var(--blue);
}

.red {
  background-color: var(--red);
}

.red-200 {
  background-color: var(--red-200);
}

.black-rgba {
  background-color: rgba(var(--RGB_black), 0.5);
}

.white-rgba {
  background-color: rgba(var(--RGB_white), 0.5);
}

.orange-rgba {
  background-color: rgba(var(--RGB_orange), 0.5);
}

.green-rgba {
  background-color: rgba(var(--RGB_green), 0.5);
}

.blue-rgba {
  background-color: rgba(var(--RGB_blue), 0.5);
}

.red-rgba {
  background-color: rgba(var(--RGB_red), 0.5);
}

.red-rgba-200 {
  background-color: rgba(var(--RGB_red-200), 0.5);
}
<!DOCTYPE html>
<html lang="en">
  <head>
    <meta charset="UTF-8" />
    <meta name="viewport" content="width=device-width, initial-scale=1.0" />
    <title>Document</title>
    <link rel="stylesheet" href="style.css" />
  </head>
  <body>
    <div>
      <input type="checkbox" id="dark-switch" name="theme" />
      <label for="dark-switch">Dark / Light</label>
    </div>

    <div class="color-box">
        <div class="colors">
          <div class="box red-200"></div>
          <div class="box black"></div>
          <div class="box white"></div>
          <div class="box orange"></div>
          <div class="box green"></div>
          <div class="box blue"></div>
          <div class="box red"></div>
        </div>
        <br>

        <h1>RGBA</h1>
        <div class="colors">
          <div class="box red-rgba-200"></div>
          <div class="box black-rgba"></div>
          <div class="box white-rgba"></div>
          <div class="box orange-rgba"></div>
          <div class="box green-rgba"></div>
          <div class="box blue-rgba"></div>
          <div class="box red-rgba"></div>
        </div>

    </div>

    <script>
      const dark_switch = document.getElementById("dark-switch");

      dark_switch.addEventListener("change", (e) => {
        e.target.checked
          ? document.documentElement.setAttribute("data-theme", "dark")
          : document.documentElement.setAttribute("data-theme", "light");
      });
    </script>
  </body>
</html>

| improve this answer | |
-1

You can set specific variable/value for each color - the original and the one with opacity:

:root {
  --color: #F00;
  --color-opacity: rgba(255, 0, 0, 0.5);
}
#a1 {
  background: var(--color);
} 
#a2 {
  background: var(--color-opacity);
}
<div id="a1">asdf</div>
<div id="a2">asdf</div>

If you can't use this and you are ok with javascript solution, you can use this one:

$(function() {
  $('button').click(function() {
    bgcolor = $('#a2').css('backgroundColor');
    rgb_value = bgcolor.match(/\d+,\s?\d+,\s?\d+/)[0]
    $('#a2').css('backgroundColor', 'rgba(' + rgb_value + ', 0.5)');
  });
});
:root {
  --color: #F00;
}
#a1 {
  background: var(--color);
} 
#a2 {
  background: var(--color);
}
<script src="https://ajax.googleapis.com/ajax/libs/jquery/2.1.1/jquery.min.js"></script>
<div id="a1">asdf</div>
<div id="a2">asdf</div>
<button>Click to change opacity</button>

| improve this answer | |
  • 1
    The opacity value will change, so it would be annoying to create a variable for every opacity. – JoshyRobot Oct 13 '16 at 1:00
-3

For using rgba() with general css variable, try this:

  1. Declare your color inside :root, but don't use rgb() as other answers do. just write the value

:root{
  --color : 255,0,0;
  }

  1. Use --color variable using var() as other answers

#some-element {
  color : rgba(var(--color),0.5);
}

| improve this answer | |
-4

In CSS you should be able to either use rgba values:

#element {
  background: rgba(240, 240, 240, 0.5);
}

or just set the opacity:

#element {
  background: #f0f0f0;
  opacity: 0.5;    
}
| improve this answer | |
  • 1
    I am unable to hardcode an rgba value, I am using color variables. I should have mentioned I cannot use opacity because I will have a background image that should not be transparent. – JoshyRobot Oct 13 '16 at 0:58
  • This isn't a solution b/c if you only want the BG to have transparency but the full element to have opacity then adding opacity to everything isn't helpful. – Levidps Feb 6 at 0:03
-4

If you love hex colors like me there is another solution. The hex value is 6 digits after that is the alpha value. 00 is 100% transparency 99 is about 75% then it uses the alphabet 'a1-af' then 'b1-bf' ending with 'ff' which is 100% opaque.

:root {
--color: #F00;
}

#element {
background: var(--color)f6;
}
| improve this answer | |
  • 1
    Unfortunately, I don't think this works. 8 digit hex code support is starting to spread, but it doesn't look like the trick used with the accepted answer works with them. Example: jsbin.com/nacuharige/edit?css,output – JoshyRobot Aug 25 '18 at 23:43
  • This does not work, although it would be a great solution if it did. – Braden Rockwell Napier Jun 5 at 3:56

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