1

Using Python 2.7. Suppose I have an unfair coin and I want to turn it into a fair coin using the following way,

  1. Probability of generating head is equal for unfair coin;
  2. Flip unfair coin and only accept head;
  3. When a head is appearing, treat it as 1 (head for virtual fair coin), when another head is appearing, treat it as 0 (tail for virtual fair coin), next time when head appears, treat it as 1, next time treat as 0, ..., and so on.

Not sure if this method works? Actually I am not quite confident about the method above and also how to use equalCoinHelper() correctly (I mark my question in my code).

If anyone have any good ideas, it will be great.

from __future__ import print_function
import random
counter = 0

# 0.3 probability return head as 1
# 0.7 probability return tail as 0
def unFairCoin():
   if random.random() < 0.3:
       return 1
   else:
       return 0

# probability of generating 1 is equal, so keep 1 only
def equalCoinHelper():
    result = 0
    while result == 0:
        result = unFairCoin()

def equalDistribution():
    global counter
    # not think about how to leverage this better
    equalCoinHelper()
    counter += 1
    if counter % 2 == 0:
        return 1
    else:
        return 0

if __name__ == "__main__":
    # generate 10 random 0/1 with equal probability
    print ([equalDistribution() for _ in range(10)])
  • 1
    billthelizard.com/2009/09/… – Barmar Oct 13 '16 at 5:43
  • 1
    Google "turn unfair coin toss into fair" and you'll find lots of papers that describe the same algorithm. – Barmar Oct 13 '16 at 5:44
  • 1
    No, I just found it by googling. – Barmar Oct 13 '16 at 6:38
  • 2
    This algorithm simply returns a non-random sequence that alternates 1, 0, 1, 0, 1, 0, ... FWIW, Bill the Lizard is a prominent Stack Overflow member and former diamond moderator. – PM 2Ring Oct 13 '16 at 7:48
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    Well, the algorithm given by Billk the Lizard is the standard way of doing this. As Bill's page mentions this algorithm was first published by von Neumann, but it has been re-discovered many times (including by me :) ). To learn more about this important topic, please see Whitening transformation. – PM 2Ring Oct 13 '16 at 8:22
3

Getting a Fair Toss From a Biased Coin explains a simple algorithm for turning a biased coin into a fair coin:

  1. Flip the coin twice.
  2. If both tosses are the same (heads-heads or tails-tails), repeat step 1.
  3. If the tosses come up heads-tails, count the toss as heads. If the tosses come up tails-heads, count it as tails.

In Python this would be:

def fairCoin():
    coin1 = unfairCoin()
    coin2 = unfairCoin()
    if coin1 == coin2:
        return fairCoin() # both are the same, so repeat it
    elif coin1 == 1 and coin2 == 0:
        return 1
    else:
        return 0

The elif and else blocks can be simplified to just:

    else:
        return coin1
  • Thanks Barmar, I read this and understand flip twice or more times (and combine 0/1 outcome) is a solution. My question is, is it possible to resolve the problem by a new method as I mentioned, flip and only keep 1? If not, what is wrong with my method? – Lin Ma Oct 13 '16 at 6:27
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    I don't know. That seems more like a math question than programming. – Barmar Oct 13 '16 at 6:38
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    @LinMa math.stackexchange.com would be the correct place to ask about your method – Barmar Oct 13 '16 at 7:08
  • I will go there and mark your reply as answer, thanks for all the help. – Lin Ma Oct 13 '16 at 7:09
2

An alternative implementation of @Barmar's answer that avoids the recursive call (even though it may be harmless)

def fairCoin():
    coin1 = 0
    coin2 = 0
    while coin1 == coin2:
        coin1 = unfairCoin()
        coin2 = unfairCoin()
    return coin1
  • Thanks user3386109, I understand your method, my question is, is it possible to resolve the problem by a new method as I mentioned, flip and only keep 1? If not, what is wrong with my method? – Lin Ma Oct 13 '16 at 7:05
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    @LinMa Your method cannot work, because if you flip and only keep 1, then you haven't used the result of the flip at all. – user3386109 Oct 13 '16 at 7:06
  • Thanks user3386109, I think I leverage flip result since I flip and get two numbers 0 or 1, and I always keep 1. I think for unfair coin, the probability of generating 1 is always the same, correct? – Lin Ma Oct 13 '16 at 7:07
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    @LinMa I see that you will ask on math.stackexchange.com, so I will let them explain. – user3386109 Oct 13 '16 at 7:13
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    Nice user3386109, I fully understand your method, I just do not know what is wrong with my method. Let us discuss there on math exchange. Vote up for your replies. – Lin Ma Oct 13 '16 at 7:16

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