19

When writing if-else statements in C, is there a reason why one would preferentially use the operator "equal to" over "not equal to", when both can produce the same outcome?

The code below provides context. Whereby, if the argument count is equal to 2, a string will be retrieved from the user. However, if any other value of arguments is obtained, an error message will appear.

int main(int argc, string argv[])
{
    string msg;

    if (argc == 2) 
    {
        msg = GetString();
    }
    else
    {
        printf("ERROR: Please only enter a single key! \n");
        return 1;
    }

However, I can achieve the exact same outcome as the above by changing the condition of the if-else loop to being "not equals to", and flipping the associated actions. See below:

int main(int argc, string argv[])
{
    string msg;

    if (argc != 2) 
    {
        printf("ERROR: Please only enter a single key! \n");
        return 1;
    }
    else
    {
        msg = GetString();
    }

Anyways, as both produce the same outcome, should one be used preferentially over the other?

  • If you think it matters, then you ought to expect the compiler to make such a trivial transformation for you. – jamesdlin Oct 14 '16 at 6:17
  • There is also the question of what string is in this code, since main() accepts an array of them. If string is not equivalent to char *, the code has undefined behaviour. There is potentially also undefined behaviour if GetString() returns anything other than a char *. If there is undefined behaviour in this code snippet, the debate over how to implement the if statement is moot. – Peter Oct 14 '16 at 6:42
  • 8
    Can we please stop closing every single coding style question out of principle? These things are VERY IMPORTANT to discuss and there is no forum for them anywhere. Programming books typically don't mention style, neither does programmers. And as a result, the majority of all C and C++ programs are unreadble messes. Hearing pragmatic arguments about style from veteran programmers is very helpful to everyone. SO is ideal for this purpose. – Lundin Oct 14 '16 at 7:01
  • @Lundin Top voted answer: "It's just a coding style issue. IMO I hate..." Second answer: "Generally, negations are not easy for the human brain to comprehend." Really? Any science to back that up, or is that just your opinion. Third answer: "I usually prefer "equal to"..." Fourth answer, "As others have said, it's a style issue. There's no real difference." QED – user3386109 Oct 14 '16 at 15:31
  • 2
    @user3386109 Yes there is science to back that up, it is a well-known topic often brought up both in programming and discreet mathematics. Common sense will tell you as much, but if that's not enough, then see this. So in this case there is actually scientific proof that one style is better. The only issue with coding style questions is that people post too many random crap answers, essentially they are answering a question they don't know the answer to. --> – Lundin Oct 17 '16 at 6:12
14

There is one technical reason in C++, and that is because if you have a habit of using == over !=, you won't need to overload as many operators.

This matters when you are dealing with function objects ("functors"). For example when you use a standard container class to store your own custom objects and want to have them automatically sorted. In order for the function object (for example std::equal_to) to work, your class needs to overload the == operator only. You don't have to overload == and != both.

Similarly, other function objects require that you only overload < and not all of < > == != <= >=.


Generally, negations are not easy for the human brain to comprehend. Particularly if you have double negations. It is custom in most programming languages to write the equality check first, if the order doesn't matter technically. Most often it makes the code easier to read.

But as often with programming and coding style, there is no black or white rules. If the reason for the check is to find an error, then the most readable way to write error handling take precedence over "humans find negations harder to read".

Consider this not too well-written code:

if(input == good)
{
  if(format == expected)
  {
    do_stuff();
    return ok;
  }
  else
  {
    return error_format;
  }
}
else
{
  return error_input;
}

Imagine we need to add even more error handling to this. Quite a common case: suppose we are writing a parser or some data protocol decoder with lots of error handling. The multiple levels of nested braces soon would turn the code into a complete mess.

We can get rid of the need to have nested if statements if we change from == to !=.

if(input != good)
{
  return error_input;
}

if(format != expected)
{
  return error_format;
}

// if we got here then all is well
do_stuff();
return ok;

This will be much more readable and scale well if we need to add more error checks. So by changing to != we made the code more readable.

12

It's just a coding style issue. I hate nesting the main logic, I'll write it as:

int main(int argc, string argv[])
{
    if (argc != 2) 
    {
        printf("ERROR: Please only enter a single key! \n");
        return 1;
    }

    string msg = GetString();
}

BTW: The signatrue of main should be int main(int argc, char *argv[]).

  • 1
    It might be "just" a style issue, but still it is good to have a good style. For C especially, your solution is clearly cleaner and more idiomatic than either option in OP's question. – user1812457 Oct 14 '16 at 6:43
5

I usually prefer "equal to", because it makes code more "readable" for a human. It makes code simplier. It would be more named a "nice coding guidline" than a "rule" as it does not impact runtime at all (it was part of my previous company's coding guidlines).

Check this:

if ( !isEmpty() )

It will take your brain a few milliseconds more to understand what the test does than if you write:

if ( isEmpty() )

Even if it has no impact on runtime, I usually prefer "is equal" to "is not equal".

The same arguments goes to variables and function names. Prefer isSet attribute/method over isNotSet. Reading a piece of code like if ( !isNotSet() ) is easier than if if ( isSet() ), even if they are equivalent in the end.

If you use code you have no control on and this one provides a member answering a negative questions, then:

if ( isNotSet() )

is definitely easier to read for a developer than:

if ( !isNotSet() )
1

As others have said, it's a style issue. There's no real difference.

One thing to keep in mind, though, is to try to be consistent. If you have one block checking if value1 == 2, try not to have the next block check value2 != 4. The only bad style is inconsistent style.

  • What if you can short-circuit the function's logic and return early when value1 == 2, and a significant part of the logic doesn't apply when value2 == 4, though? if (value2 != 4) { /* logic */ } is a lot cleaner than if (value2 == 4) {} else { /* logic */ }, and cleaner than if (!(value2 == 4)) { /* logic */ }. Assuming the type has both operators defined, it's usually cleaner to use whichever is most appropriate for what you need to test. – Justin Time - Reinstate Monica Nov 14 '16 at 17:28
0

This is a program design question. As the programmer, you must decide which one will flow better for execution, maintenance, readability, and performance. Furthermore, these are two completely different statements. If want your function to call ONLY when argc is equal to 2 versus calling GetString(); whenever the number is not 2.

  • The two code snippets in the question have the same behavior. – user3386109 Oct 14 '16 at 6:25
0

Nowadays there's no semantic difference between the two cases, as even the more simple optimization applied by compilers could disrupt the "intended execution flow".

Maybe 30 to 40 years ago there could have been some difference between the two choices, when the code generation step of the C compiler was quite adherent to the written code.

The actual difference is today in the syntax and style clarity.

So, while writing

while( *dst++=*src++ );

nowadays could generate the very same machine code as

for( i=0; src[i] != 0; i++ )
  dst[i] = src[i];
dst[i] = '\0';

The latter could be in general much easier to read, as seen in

if( ! isOK() )
  dontDoIt();
else
  doIt();

and in

if( isOK() )
  doIt()
else
  dontDoIt();

But be assured, "clarity" is not an absolute value: it depends not just upon the "programming skills and taste" of the readers/reviewers, but also in the code itself.

Bottom line: make a choice of yours and stick with it for uniformity!