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I opened this question: Something wrong with my understanding in subnetting and got an answer.

But, a minute after i thought - for example I have this IP : 155 . 115 . 51 . 68 / 29 so I can know that 13 bits are for the subnets IDs (I can tell it by telling this IP is class B, therefor require 16 bits for the net ID and the rest of the mask (13) used for the subnets.) What I do if i get in the cmd the next IP: 10 . 115 . 51 . 68 / 29 Then, I couldnt really tell you how many bits are for the net and how many for the subnets

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CIDR means Classless Inter-Domain Routing, the notion of IP class is no longer in use. (To be honest, it's my first time hearing about it, but I'm young).

From what I could read here and there, the notion of net and subnet are no longer relevant. Here is a class A IP:

                     1                   2                   3 
 0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 0 1 
+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+ 
|0| Net           |   Subnet      |        Host                 | 
+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+

Nowadays, the net part has disappeared and is included in the subnet. The following would match the subnet mask 255.255.0.0:

                     1                   2                   3 
 0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 0 1 
+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+ 
|0|          Subnet               |        Host                 | 
+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+

The CIDR notation says it all: an IP ending in /25 has a subnet defined by 25 bits and your host is defined by the 7 bits left.

In your case of 10.115.51.68/29, your subnet requires 29 bits: the subnet mask is 255.255.255.248 .

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