38

Say you have this Action:

public List<string> Index(IFormFile file){

    //extract list of strings from the file
    return new List<string>();
}

I've found plenty of examples of saving the file to the drive, but what if I instead want to skip this and just read the lines of text into an array in memory, directly from the IFormFile?

61

The abstraction for the IFormFile has an .OpenReadStream method. To prevent a ton of undesirable and potentially large allocations, we should read a single line at a time and build up our list from each line that we read. Additionally, we could encapsulate this logic in an extension method. The Index action ends up looking like this:

public List<string> Index(IFormFile file) => file.ReadAsList();

The corresponding extension method looks like this:

public static List<string> ReadAsList(this IFormFile file)
{
    var result = new StringBuilder();
    using (var reader = new StreamReader(file.OpenReadStream()))
    {
        while (reader.Peek() >= 0)
            result.AppendLine(reader.ReadLine()); 
    }
    return result;
}

Likewise you could have an async version as well:

public static async Task<string> ReadAsStringAsync(this IFormFile file)
{
    var result = new StringBuilder();
    using (var reader = new StreamReader(file.OpenReadStream()))
    {
        while (reader.Peek() >= 0)
            result.AppendLine(await reader.ReadLineAsync()); 
    }
    return result.ToString();
}

Alternatively, you could you use an ObjectPool<StringBuilder> and modern C# 8 features.

public static async Task<string> ReadAsStringAsync(
    this IFormFile file, Object<StringBuilder> pool)
{
    var builder = pool.Get();
    try
    {
        using var reader = new StreamReader(file.OpenReadStream());
        while (reader.Peek() >= 0)
        {
            builder.AppendLine(await reader.ReadLineAsync()); 
        }
        return builder.ToString();
    }
    finally
    {
        pool.Return(builder);
    }
}

Then you could use this version this way:

public Task<List<string>> Index(
    IFormFile file, [FromServices] ObjectPool<StringBuilder> pool) =>
    file.ReadAsListAsync(pool);
6
  • this worked, though it wouldn't accept Environment.NewLine so I used Split('\n'), something about wanting a char instead of a string Oct 14 '16 at 18:05
  • 2
    Why would you read it all into a single string then Split then make a list? Why not just read it line by line and add to a list? The above code allocates a potentially giant string, to then allocate an array, then allocates a list.
    – davidfowl
    Oct 15 '16 at 8:07
  • Great observation. I was simply showing how it could be done, I'll update the code - thanks.
    – David Pine
    Oct 15 '16 at 11:17
  • @davidfowl better, or what else would you suggest?
    – David Pine
    Oct 15 '16 at 12:40
  • 1
    Much better. The garbage collector thanks you. To do even better, we'd need to know what the consumer was doing with those lines. Maybe they don't ever need to be in a list all at the same time.
    – davidfowl
    Oct 15 '16 at 16:56
13

ASP.NET Core 3.0 - Reading a form file's content into string

public static async Task<string> ReadFormFileAsync(IFormFile file)
{
    if (file == null || file.Length == 0)
    {
        return await Task.FromResult((string)null);
    }
    
    using (var reader = new StreamReader(file.OpenReadStream()))
    {
        return await reader.ReadToEndAsync();
    }
}

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