I'm trying to make a grid background out of dots. I can't just use an image, because I need everything to be configurable:

  • background color
  • dot color
  • dot size
  • space between dots

Unless there's a better solution, I think the only way I can achieve this is with pure CSS. I've done some looking around and so far the closest thing i've found is using a radial-gradient. I'm having trouble though; I haven't been able to find a solution that lets me configure both the dot size and the space between dots while keeping a circle shape. I've gotten close, but than my dots end up looking like diamonds instead of circles. Here's what i've come up with so far:

https://jsfiddle.net/yzpuydtn/

body {
  background-image: radial-gradient(black 2px, white 2px);
  background-size:40px 40px;
}

Does anyone have any suggestions? Initially i'd like to have my dots be 2px x 2px and 40 px apart. Is there a better way to do this, or am I just configuring my gradient incorrectly? I think i'm close, but depending on how I zoom they look like either circles, diamonds or squares and I need it to always look like circles.

  • 1
    I'd just use SVG; then it's scalable and shouldn't deform when zooming. – Heretic Monkey Oct 14 '16 at 17:41
  • If I use an SVG, can I adjust colors and dimensions on the fly? – user3715648 Oct 14 '16 at 18:03
  • You can interact with SVG via the DOM, just as you can HTML. – Heretic Monkey Oct 14 '16 at 18:47
up vote 2 down vote accepted

Using %: https://jsfiddle.net/yzpuydtn/11/
Using vw: http://jsfiddle.net/otwhu0uk/2/

Here is an example. I really hope this helps you.

body {
  /* Controls size of dot */
  background-image: radial-gradient(black 5%, white 0%);
  /* Controls Spacing, First value will scale width, second, height between dots */
  background-size:5% 10%;
}
  • Please read again the question. And than explain in your answer how you managed to get perfect circles at any size and distance. – Roko C. Buljan Oct 14 '16 at 17:52
  • Sorry, rushed my answer. The reason they are perfect circles is, because I am using percentages instead of pixels as units. I will be looking into properly answering your question. – Kanstantsin Arlouski Oct 14 '16 at 17:59
  • Sorry but I don't see how your answer code is configurable and how % could make any difference jsfiddle.net/yzpuydtn/1 – Roko C. Buljan Oct 14 '16 at 18:01
  • I need the dots to be 2px x 2px. If it's 20% that's not the case, right? Is there some way to specify what number the 20% is relative to? – user3715648 Oct 14 '16 at 18:03
  • 1
    Sorry, the unit is called vw. It is a unit that is relative to 1% of the width of the viewport. % on the other hand goes off of the width of the container. – Kanstantsin Arlouski Oct 14 '16 at 18:41

https://jsfiddle.net/yzpuydtn/9/
With JavaScript:

var setBackground = function(dotColor, backgroundColor, dotRadius, dotSpacing){
    // create string for background-image property
    var image = 'radial-gradient(circle, '+dotColor+' '+dotRadius+'px, '+backgroundColor+' 0px)';
    // create string for background-size property
    var size = dotSpacing+'px '+dotSpacing+'px';
    //set properties
    document.body.style.backgroundImage = image;
    document.body.style.backgroundSize = size;
};


Example:
setBackground('red','green','20','50');
or
setBackground('rgb(255,165,0)','rgb(160,255,170)','10','60');
Hope it helps.

  • Thanks. I updated the OP a bit to try and be more clear. I mentioned customizable so that someone just wouldn't suggest using an image; I know how to use JS to customize it. The issue i'm running into is finding the correct CSS that allows those things to be changed. In the fiddle I posted I almost have it, but the dots are not always circles. – user3715648 Oct 14 '16 at 18:35
  • Please give a look at How do I format my code blocks. – Heretic Monkey Oct 14 '16 at 18:44
  • Maybe add the 'circle' keyword to radial-gradient, i.e. radial-gradient(circle, black 2px, white 2px)? (developer.mozilla.org/en-US/docs/Web/CSS/radial-gradient) – Logan Gill Oct 14 '16 at 18:55

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