2

I've just started to DSA, and had a question about insertion sort.

This the version from textbooks / tutorials.

void insertion_sort(int A[], int n) {
    for (int i = 0; i < n; i++) {
        int temp = A[i];    
        int j = i;

        while (temp < A[j - 1] && j > 0) {
            A[j] = A[j - 1];   
            j = j - 1;
        }
        A[j] = temp;       
    }  
}

I was thinking would it make a difference, if we used swapping numbers instead of shifting the numbers and inserting the temp value in the correct hole position.

void insertionSort(int A[], int n) {
    for (int i = 0; i < n; i++) {
        int temp = A[i];
        int j = i;

        while (temp < A[j - 1] && j > 0) {
            swap(A[j], A[j - 1]);
            j--;
        }
    }
}

Swap Code:

void swap(int &a,int &b){
    int temp = a;
    a = b;
    b = temp;
}

Oh, and it would be really awesome if someone could explain the Time Complexities of both.

  • They'll both be O(n^2). The swap for shifting is a nice touch. – AndyG Oct 14 '16 at 20:06
  • 2
    Swapping involves considerably more assigents (by a constant factor) so its an important optimization. – rici Oct 14 '16 at 20:21
  • 1
    Unrelated to your question, but both versions dereference memory before A[]. The comparison of temp < A[j-1] the first time through will have j=i=0, and dereference A[-1]. That's probably not what you want. – Neil Oct 14 '16 at 20:37
  • Oh I should have set i = 1 in the outer loop I guess – snbk97 Oct 15 '16 at 3:48
  • I've just started to DSA - DSA, DSA? – greybeard Oct 15 '16 at 6:46
0

Your proposed alternative is incomplete, you did not post the code for swap(). In C, swap must be a macro and such a macro is easy to botch, whereas in C++, it can be a function that takes both arguments by reference.

Furthermore, you should test j > 0 before dereferencing A[j - 1]. As posted, the code invokes undefined behavior.

Regarding your questions, both functions are equally slow with a time complexity of O(N2), but the second is potentially slower because swapping involves more reads and writes than simply shifting the values by one position, but it could be faster on a sorted array because the first version has redundant stores.

Note that you can further simplify the code at the price of efficiency this way:

void insertionSort(int A[], int n) {
    for (int i = 1; i < n; i++) {
        for (int j = i; j > 0 && A[j] < A[j - 1]; j--) {
            swap(A[j], A[j - 1]);
        }
    }
}
  • I used swap() with arguments as reference in C++ (forgot to mention). Can you please link me to a page, where it explains swapping is slower than shifting, I'd really like to read it. (or maybe an explanation) – snbk97 Oct 15 '16 at 3:51
  • Post the code for your swap() function. There are many ways to swap 2 integers: most will involve 2 reads and 2 writes, using an XCHG instruction is even more costly. In contrast, shifting costs only a single read and write per step and a single write at the end. As usual, the only way to assess code efficiency is to measure it! Given the quadratic complexity, a moderately large array will provide a good benchmark. Try different cases: sorted, pseudo-random, reverse order... – chqrlie Oct 15 '16 at 7:03
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Time complexity for both the approaches is O(N^2) in worst case. But number of operations in the second approach is more as compared to the first because second approach performs the same number of swaps as the number of shifts in the first approach but swap require 3 assignments as compared to just one in in shift-based approach. Hence, method proposed by you will be slower as compared to just shifting the elements.

#include <stdio.h>
#include <stdlib.h>
#include <time.h>
#include <stdint.h>

void insertion_shift(int* arr, int n){
    int i,j,k;
    for(i=1;i<n;++i){
        int temp=arr[i];
        for(j=i;j>0 && arr[j-1]>temp;--j)
            arr[j]=arr[j-1];
        arr[j]=temp;
    }
}
void swap(int* a, int* b){
  int temp= *a;
  *a= *b;
  *b= temp;
}

void insertion_swap(int* arr, int n){
   int i,j,k;
   for(i=1;i<n;++i){
      int temp=arr[i];
      for(j=i;j>0 && arr[j-1]>temp;--j)
         swap(&arr[j-1],&arr[j]);
   }
 }      

void print_arr(int* arr, int n){
   int i;
   for(i=0;i<n;++i)
      printf("%d ",arr[i]);
   printf("\n");
}

int main(){
   int n;
   scanf("%d",&n);
   int* arr1= (int*)malloc(sizeof(int)*n);
   int* arr2= (int*)malloc(sizeof(int)*n);
   int i;
   for(i=0;i<n;++i){
      scanf("%d",&arr1[i]);
      arr2[i]=arr1[i];
   }

   struct timespec start, end;
   clock_gettime(CLOCK_MONOTONIC_RAW,&start);
   insertion_shift(arr1,n);
   clock_gettime(CLOCK_MONOTONIC_RAW,&end);
   uint64_t time_shift= (end.tv_sec - start.tv_sec)*1000000 +
                        (end.tv_nsec - start.tv_nsec)/1000;
   printf("using shift: %lld microseconds\n",time_shift);

   clock_gettime(CLOCK_MONOTONIC_RAW,&start);
   insertion_swap(arr2,n);
   clock_gettime(CLOCK_MONOTONIC_RAW,&end);

   uint64_t time_swap= (end.tv_sec - start.tv_sec)*1000000 +
                       (end.tv_nsec - start.tv_nsec)/1000;
   printf("using swap: %lld microseconds\n",time_swap);

}

Here is what I got when I called both functions on the same array of size 10000. Compilation and execution for 10000 elements array. If still not convinced, try to generate a random array of size 1000-10000 and run the above code to observe the difference.

  • Good timing code! May I suggest printing both timing after the benchmark to avoid any interference between the OS dealing with the display of the first line of outut and the timing of the insertion_swap(). Also use 1000000LL to avoid integer overflow on architectures with 32-bit time_t. You might also try benchmarking different orders before the sort and use a pseudo-random number generator for easier adaptation to various array sizes. – chqrlie Oct 15 '16 at 8:35

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