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This question already has an answer here:

Hello, I saw this headline thousand times here but still I could not find an answer matching this. Sorry if I'm just ignorant or so.

Let's have two tables:

CREATE TABLE `TableA` (
  `id` int(11) NOT NULL AUTO_INCREMENT,
  `string_key` varchar(256) COLLATE utf8_unicode_ci DEFAULT NULL,
  PRIMARY KEY (`id`),
  UNIQUE KEY `string_key` (`string_key`(255))
) ENGINE=InnoDB DEFAULT CHARSET=utf8 COLLATE=utf8_unicode_ci;


CREATE TABLE `TableB` (
  `id` int(11) NOT NULL AUTO_INCREMENT,
  `referring_string_key` varchar(256) COLLATE utf8_unicode_ci DEFAULT NULL,
  PRIMARY KEY (`id`),
  KEY `referring_string_key` (`referring_string_key`(255))
) ENGINE=InnoDB DEFAULT CHARSET=utf8 COLLATE=utf8_unicode_ci;

Creating FK fails with Cannot add foreign key constraint. (nothing else)

ALTER TABLE `TableB`
ADD FOREIGN KEY (`referring_string_key`) REFERENCES `TableA` (`string_key`) ON DELETE SET NULL ON UPDATE CASCADE;

Well ..

  • Both tables are innoDb with same collation
  • Both columns are same datatype (varchar(256) default null)
  • Both columns have same collation
  • Indices set on both sides (does not work even if TableA.string_key index is not unique)
  • Does not work even if setting any combination of update/delete events
  • Tables are empty.

What I'm missing? Or one just can't create FK between two nullable varchars?

Thank you in andvace.

marked as duplicate by Drew mysql Oct 15 '16 at 15:55

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    255 as opposed to 256 will work with your collation – Drew Oct 15 '16 at 15:56
  • UNIQUE (str(...)) is always a mistake -- it checks only the prefix for uniqueness. – Rick James Oct 21 '16 at 3:46
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Typo?

UNIQUE KEY `string_key` (`string_key`(255))

should be

UNIQUE KEY (`string_key`)

Also, datatype needs to be the same, including length, which is indeed the case, just mentioning this in case you actually wanted VARCHAR(255).

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