7

I got an HTTP API. I am loading a set of objects as a json.

I want to cast to a Typescript object, but with the keyword "as" it is not working and even not with < Type > in front of the object.

r.forEach(entry => {
    entry.creationDate = new Date(entry.creationDate.date);
    entry.creator = <User>entry.creator;
    return entry;
});

The console.log directly after entry.creator casting outputs a normal "Object".

Can someone give me an advice?

2 Answers 2

23

I I've struggled with similar problems, and in my opinion this is a defect in typescript. When you are doing the cast as you did. Or a sample code like this:

class User {
    name: string;

    doConsole(): void {
        console.log(`Name: ${this.name}`);
    }
}

let userObj = { name: 'jose' };

let user = new User();
Object.assign(user, userObj);

user.doConsole();

You will notice that doConsole won't be a function in the casted object. That's the generated JS to this:

var User = (function () {
    function User(name) {
        this.name = name;
    }
    User.prototype.doConsole = function () {
        console.log("Name: " + this.name);
    };
    return User;
}());
var userObj = { name: 'jose' };
var user = userObj;
user.doConsole();

As you can see it doesn't uses the prototype function you prepared by the class when doing the cast. My alternative was to do something like this:

class User {
    name: string;

    doConsole(): void {
       console.log(`Name: ${this.name}`);
    }
}

let userObj = { name: 'jose' };

let user = new User();
Object.assign(user, userObj);

user.doConsole();

This ensures that you are using the prototype function, as you can see by the generated JS:

var User = (function () {
    function User() {
    }
    User.prototype.doConsole = function () {
        console.log("Name: " + this.name);
    };
    return User;
}());
var userObj = { name: 'jose' };
var user = new User();
Object.assign(user, userObj);
user.doConsole();

So basically what I'm saying is that I agree with you that it should works like you did, but the transpiler doesn't use the prototyped function, so it won't work.

I hope this helps you.

4
  • Glad to help :) Aug 2, 2017 at 22:04
  • 4
    Great workaround! I'm primaraly .net so I'm not used to this crap. Hard to believe they even have 'as T or <T> if they don't work Aug 11, 2017 at 12:00
  • 3
    I don't get it, i dont see any difference between the first code block and the second
    – Ayyash
    Aug 24, 2020 at 11:23
  • Why is this up voted? There is absolutely no difference between the two code blocks. Do people actually read answers?
    – Diego
    Mar 24, 2022 at 14:52
1

Javascript itself doesn't support strong typings. You can use strong typing only with Typescript but it only works for compile-time. What you are experiencing on runtime is the expected behaviour. Not a bug or error with your code.

Some of the great features that Typescript provides are:

  • Compile time checking: Find potential errors on your code before your customer does.
  • Strongly-typed objects: By specifying the type of objects your functions expect you can reduce the risk of unexpected results.

Source of my quote and more info about strong typing here.

1
  • 9
    Downvoted, because this does not answer the OP's question; they are specifically asking about why their TypeScript code does not meet their expectations. Further, this answer doesn't give any useful information on why the TypeScript code does not work as intended. Still further, the answer is contradictory. "JavaScript doesn't support strong typings." and "Some of the great features that Typescript provides are: ... Strongly-typed objects ..." are mutually exclusive by their nature. I think you should clarify what you meant by this answer. Oct 23, 2018 at 21:44

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.