Something this simple should be easily accomplished, yet I'm pulling my hair out over how complicated it is.

All I want to do is animate the mounting & unmounting of a React component, that's it. Here's what I've tried so far and why each solution won't work:

  1. ReactCSSTransitionGroup - I'm not using CSS classes at all, it's all JS styles, so this won't work.
  2. ReactTransitionGroup - This lower level API is great, but it requires you to use a callback when the animation is complete, so just using CSS transitions won't work here. There are always animation libraries, which leads to the next point:
  3. GreenSock - The licensing is too restrictive for business use IMO.
  4. React Motion - This seems great, but TransitionMotion is extremely confusing and overly complicated for what I need.
  5. Of course I can just do trickery like Material UI does, where the elements are rendered but remain hidden (left: -10000px) but I'd rather not go that route. I consider it hacky, and I want my components to unmount so they clean up and are not cluttering up the DOM.

I want something that's easy to implement. On mount, animate a set of styles; on unmount, animate the same (or another) set of styles. Done. It also has to be high performance on multiple platforms.

I've hit a brick wall here. If I'm missing something and there's an easy way to do this, let me know.

  • What kind of animation are we talking here? – Pranesh Ravi Oct 21 '16 at 5:15
  • Just something simple, like a CSS opacity fade in and a transform: scale – ffxsam Oct 21 '16 at 5:16
  • Point 1 and 2 confuses me. What kind of animations are you using? JS transitions or CSS transitions ? – Pranesh Ravi Oct 21 '16 at 6:05
  • 1
    Don't confuse CSS styles/classes (e.g. .thing { color: #fff; }) with JS styles (const styles = { thing: { color: '#fff' } })) – ffxsam Oct 21 '16 at 6:07
  • But the problem is, when you try to change the style using javascript, you're actually replacing the style of a element which won't give any transition. – Pranesh Ravi Oct 21 '16 at 6:22
up vote 54 down vote accepted
+100

This is a bit lengthy but I've used all the native events and methods to achieve this animation. No ReactCSSTransitionGroup, ReactTransitionGroup and etc.

Things I've used

  • React lifecycle methods
  • onTransitionEnd event

How this works

  • Mount the element based on the mount prop passed(mounted) and with default style(opacity: 0)
  • After mount or update, use componentDidMount (componentWillReceiveProps for further updates)to change the style (opacity: 1) with a timeout(to make it async).
  • During unmount, pass a prop to the component to identify unmount, change the style again(opacity: 0), onTransitionEnd, remove unmount the element from the DOM.

Continue the cycle.

Go through the code, you'll understand. If any clarification is needed, please leave a comment.

Hope this helps.

class App extends React.Component{
  constructor(props) {
    super(props)
    this.transitionEnd = this.transitionEnd.bind(this)
    this.mountStyle = this.mountStyle.bind(this)
    this.unMountStyle = this.unMountStyle.bind(this)
    this.state ={ //base css
      show: true,
      style :{
        fontSize: 60,
        opacity: 0,
        transition: 'all 2s ease',
      }
    }
  }
  
  componentWillReceiveProps(newProps) { //check for the mounted props
    if(!newProps.mounted)
      return this.unMountStyle() //call outro animation when mounted prop is false
    this.setState({ //remount the node when the mounted prop is true
      show: true
    })
    setTimeout(this.mountStyle, 10) //call the into animiation
  }
  
  unMountStyle() { //css for unmount animation
    this.setState({
      style: {
        fontSize: 60,
        opacity: 0,
        transition: 'all 1s ease',
      }
    })
  }
  
  mountStyle() { // css for mount animation
    this.setState({
      style: {
        fontSize: 60,
        opacity: 1,
        transition: 'all 1s ease',
      }
    })
  }
  
  componentDidMount(){
    setTimeout(this.mountStyle, 10) //call the into animiation
  }
  
  transitionEnd(){
    if(!this.props.mounted){ //remove the node on transition end when the mounted prop is false
      this.setState({
        show: false
      })
    }
  }
  
  render() {
    return this.state.show && <h1 style={this.state.style} onTransitionEnd={this.transitionEnd}>Hello</h1> 
  }
}

class Parent extends React.Component{
  constructor(props){
    super(props)
    this.buttonClick = this.buttonClick.bind(this)
    this.state = {
      showChild: true,
    }
  }
  buttonClick(){
    this.setState({
      showChild: !this.state.showChild
    })
  }
  render(){
    return <div>
        <App onTransitionEnd={this.transitionEnd} mounted={this.state.showChild}/>
        <button onClick={this.buttonClick}>{this.state.showChild ? 'Unmount': 'Mount'}</button>
      </div>
  }
}

ReactDOM.render(<Parent />, document.getElementById('app'))
<script src="https://cdnjs.cloudflare.com/ajax/libs/react/15.3.2/react-with-addons.js"></script>
<script src="https://cdnjs.cloudflare.com/ajax/libs/react/15.1.0/react-dom.min.js"></script>
<div id="app"></div>

  • Thanks for this! Where did you learn about onTransitionEnd? I don't see it in the React docs. – ffxsam Oct 24 '16 at 21:59
  • @ffxsam facebook.github.io/react/docs/events.html It's under the transition events. – Pranesh Ravi Oct 24 '16 at 22:00
  • How did you know what it did though, the documentation doesn't explain anything. Another question: how did you know componentWillReceiveProps can return something? Where can I read more on that? – ffxsam Oct 24 '16 at 22:02
  • @ffxsam onTransitionEnd is a native JavaScript event. You can google about it. facebook.github.io/react/docs/… will give you an idea about componentWillReceiveProps. – Pranesh Ravi Oct 24 '16 at 22:04
  • 6
    BTW I think there's a mistake in your code. In your Parent component, you reference this.transitionEnd – ffxsam Nov 8 '16 at 20:07

Using the knowledge gained from Pranesh's answer, I came up with an alternate solution that's configurable and reusable:

const AnimatedMount = ({ unmountedStyle, mountedStyle }) => {
  return (Wrapped) => class extends Component {
    constructor(props) {
      super(props);
      this.state = {
        style: unmountedStyle,
      };
    }

    componentWillEnter(callback) {
      this.onTransitionEnd = callback;
      setTimeout(() => {
        this.setState({
          style: mountedStyle,
        });
      }, 20);
    }

    componentWillLeave(callback) {
      this.onTransitionEnd = callback;
      this.setState({
        style: unmountedStyle,
      });
    }

    render() {
      return <div
        style={this.state.style}
        onTransitionEnd={this.onTransitionEnd}
      >
        <Wrapped { ...this.props } />
      </div>
    }
  }
};

Usage:

import React, { PureComponent } from 'react';

class Thing extends PureComponent {
  render() {
    return <div>
      Test!
    </div>
  }
}

export default AnimatedMount({
  unmountedStyle: {
    opacity: 0,
    transform: 'translate3d(-100px, 0, 0)',
    transition: 'opacity 250ms ease-out, transform 250ms ease-out',
  },
  mountedStyle: {
    opacity: 1,
    transform: 'translate3d(0, 0, 0)',
    transition: 'opacity 1.5s ease-out, transform 1.5s ease-out',
  },
})(Thing);

And finally, in another component's render method:

return <div>
  <ReactTransitionGroup>
    <Thing />
  </ReactTransitionGroup>
</div>

What if onMount you add another className, that has the transition in it, and onUnMount you remove that classname?

  • This can work, but you need to somehow delay componentWillUnmount, so the animations will have time to end before the component will disappear from the document. – Gershon Papi Oct 24 '16 at 20:55
  • @ffxsam, how are you controlling the unMount? Maybe you could change it to instead remove the classname with the transition, and set a timeout to unmount after the transition is finished. – Frazer Kirkman Oct 25 '16 at 19:40

For those considering react-motion, animating a single component when it mounts and unmounts can be overwhelming to set up.

There's a library called react-motion-ui-pack that makes this process a lot easier to start with. It's a wrapper around react-motion, which means you get all the benefits from the library (i.e. you are able to interrupt the animation, have multiple unmounts happen at the same time).

Usage:

import Transition from 'react-motion-ui-pack'

<Transition
  enter={{ opacity: 1, translateX: 0 }}
  leave={{ opacity: 0, translateX: -100 }}
  component={false}
>
  { this.state.show &&
      <div key="hello">
        Hello
      </div>
  }
</Transition>

Enter defines what the end state of the component should be; leave is the style that is applied when the component is unmounted.

You might find that once you have used the UI pack a couple of times, the react-motion library might not be as daunting anymore.

Animating enter and exit transitions is much easier with react-move.

example on codesandbox

I countered this problem during my work, and simple as it seemed, it is really not in React. In a normal scenario where you render something like:

this.state.show ? {childen} : null;

as this.state.show changes the children are mounted/unmounted right away.

One approach I took is creating a wrapper component Animate and use it like

<Animate show={this.state.show}>
  {childen}
</Animate>

now as this.state.show changes, we can perceive prop changes with getDerivedStateFromProps(componentWillReceiveProps) and create intermediate render stages to perform animations.

A stage cycle might look like this

We start with Static Stage when the children is mounted or unmounted.

Once we detect the show flag changes, we enter Prep Stage where we calculate necessary properties like height and width from ReactDOM.findDOMNode.getBoundingClientRect().

Then entering Animate State we can use css transition to change height, width and opacity from 0 to the calculated values (or to 0 if unmounting).

At the end of transition, we use onTransitionEnd api to change back to Static stage.

There are much more details to how the stages transfer smoothly but this could be overall idea:)

If anyone interested, I created a React library https://github.com/MingruiZhang/react-animate-mount to share my solution. Any feedback welcome:)

  • Thank you for your feedback, sorry for crude answer earlier. I added more detail and a diagram to my answer, hope this can be more helpful to others. – Mingrui Zhang Jul 13 at 5:50
  • @MingruiZhang It's good to see that you've taken the comments positively and improved your answer. It's very refreshing to see. Good work. – Bugs Jul 13 at 7:37

Your Answer

 

By clicking "Post Your Answer", you acknowledge that you have read our updated terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy, and that your continued use of the website is subject to these policies.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.