94

How to log to a file without using third party logger (serilog, elmah etc.) in .NET CORE?

public void ConfigureServices(IServiceCollection services)
{
    services.AddLogging();
}

public void Configure(IApplicationBuilder app, IHostingEnvironment env, ILoggerFactory loggerFactory)
{
    loggerFactory.AddConsole(Configuration.GetSection("Logging"));
    loggerFactory.AddDebug();
}
4
  • 4
    That's because there is no out-of-the-box logger which logs to a file, hence my comment: "Write your own". Look at how console logger is implemented, its just 3 classes or so you need to implement. Since your constrain is "no third party" library, the only remaining answer is: "Write your own [logger]".
    – Tseng
    Oct 16 '16 at 18:51
  • And to add to this, in the standard scenario (hosting in IIS or on azure) you just dump / redirect the console output to a file (for IIS/Azure, you do that in the web.config). Can be done on Linux too, with the stuff linux/the shell offers you
    – Tseng
    Oct 16 '16 at 18:53
  • I agree about that and it can be implemented through Console.SetOut too, but in Enterprise Library and previous logging system had several default options. But looks like new one has only Debug, Console, TraceSource and EventSource which makes me think I'm missing something here and looking for a method and/or hidden links that I may missed on my search. Thanks for your time
    – cilerler
    Oct 16 '16 at 19:04
  • Writing your own simple logger is easy. You just need to implement 3 classes like in this answer. In some cases, writing your logger is the best solution, but if you need advanced logging consider using a third-party logger.
    – ge333
    12 hours ago
37

Issue http://github.com/aspnet/Logging/issues/441 is closed and MS officially recommends to use 3rd party file loggers. You might want to avoid using heavyweight logging frameworks like serilog, nlog etc because they are just excessive in case if all you need is a simple logger that writes to a file and nothing more (without any additional dependencies).

I faced the same situation, and implemented simple (but efficient) file logger: https://github.com/nreco/logging

  • can be used in .NET Core 1.x and .NET Core 2.x / 3.x apps
  • supports custom log message handler for writing logs in JSON or CSV
  • implements simple 'rolling file' feature if max log file size is specified
2
  • 1
    does anyone knows if this is still the case for .net 5?
    – mvoelcker
    May 17 at 21:54
  • @mvoelcker NReco.Logging.File should work just fine in NET5 / upcoming NET6 apps. May 18 at 6:05
16

.NET Core does not (and probably will not) provide a built-in ILoggerProvider implementation for file logging.

There is a facade which makes trace source logging (the built-in logger framework originated in classic .NET) available for .NET Core applications. It can be ok for those who are already familiar with it, but be prepared that configuration is somewhat cumbersome on .NET Core (for details, see this nice article).

As an alternative, you may try my lightweight ILogger<T> implementation which covers the features of the built-in ConsoleLogger and provides additional essential features and good customizability. My library is free, open-source and has only framework dependencies. It completely conforms with the Microsoft provider implementations.

Usage is as simple as follows:

dotnet add package Karambolo.Extensions.Logging.File

ASP.NET Core 3.x web applications:

public static IHostBuilder CreateHostBuilder(string[] args) =>
    Host.CreateDefaultBuilder(args)
        .ConfigureWebHostDefaults(webBuilder =>
        {
            webBuilder
                .ConfigureLogging((ctx, builder) =>
                {
                    builder.AddConfiguration(ctx.Configuration.GetSection("Logging"));
                    builder.AddFile(o => o.RootPath = ctx.HostingEnvironment.ContentRootPath);
                })
                .UseStartup<Startup>();
        });

ASP.NET Core 2.1+ web applications:

public static IWebHostBuilder CreateWebHostBuilder(string[] args) =>
    WebHost.CreateDefaultBuilder(args)
        .ConfigureLogging((ctx, builder) =>
        {
            builder.AddConfiguration(ctx.Configuration.GetSection("Logging"));
            builder.AddFile(o => o.RootPath = ctx.HostingEnvironment.ContentRootPath);
        })
        .UseStartup<Startup>();

.NET Core 2.1+ console applications:

// build configuration
// var configuration = ...;

// configure DI
var services = new ServiceCollection();

services.AddLogging(builder =>
{
    builder.AddConfiguration(configuration.GetSection("Logging"));
    builder.AddFile(o => o.RootPath = AppContext.BaseDirectory);
});

// create logger factory
using (var sp = services.BuildServiceProvider())
{
    var loggerFactory = sp.GetService<ILoggerFactory>();
    // ...
}

For configuration details, see the project site.

2
  • 1
    I started using your library, but do not know how to supply the json configuration that is shown on the project site. Is there documentation?
    – umutesen
    Feb 22 '18 at 15:57
  • 1
    You find the .NET Core configuration API documentation here.
    – Adam Simon
    Feb 25 '18 at 11:54
15

The ones provided by Adam and Vitaliy are still probably the most simple ones to date (thanks guys btw!).
Since an external NuGet is necessary anyway, worth mentioning that there is also a "standalone" extension of the Serilog rolling file sink that can be simply used as a logging provider for .net core, without completely swapping out the logging pipeline (pulls other dependencies, but I don't see that as an issue if you need the few extra features provided)

As of March 2020, this is the complete picture:

1
  • Warning:NReco.Logging.File and Karambolo.Extensions.Logging.File are loggers using a queue and an interval flushing to disk. If your application crashes, you'll be missing the relevant lines, because the queue isn't flushed on the exact moment of the crash - unless you are extremely lucky. Don't know about Serilog, but they probably have their implementation from there. Aug 30 at 11:47
8

If you are using IIS, you can enable and view stdout logs:

  1. Edit the web.config file.
  2. Set stdoutLogEnabled to true.
  3. Change the stdoutLogFile path to point to the logs folder (for example, .\logs\stdout).
  4. Save the file.
  5. Make a request to the app.
  6. Navigate to the logs folder. Find and open the most recent stdout log.

For information about stdout logging, see Troubleshoot ASP.NET Core on IIS.

2
  • 1
    What about the windows services projects in .net core ? Sep 11 '20 at 8:13
  • This really saved my day
    – the91end
    May 17 at 10:45
5

Necromancing.
It's not quite that easy !

First, notice that .NET Core logging is more like Tracing in Full .NET Framework.
So you need to create both a TraceListener (ILoggerProvider), and a TraceWriter (ILogger).

Also, you need the create a LoggerOptions class, where you set the logfile-name, etc.
Furthermore, you can optionally create a class which inherits from ConfigureFromConfigurationOptions<T>, which can be called from ILoggingBuilder.TryAddEnumerable, I presume to configure your options from configuration entries.

Also, you need to create an an Extension-Method class, with which you can add ILoggerProvider to ILoggingBuilder.

The next stumbling-block is, that Microsoft has different "log-categories", e.g. in a Windows-Service

Microsoft.Extensions.Hosting.Internal.ApplicationLifetime
Microsoft.Extensions.Hosting.Internal.Host
Microsoft.Hosting.Lifetime

Now it will create a logger-instance for each of those categories.
Which means if you want to write your log-output to just one file, this will explode, because once the ILoggerProvider has created an instance of ILogger for ApplicationLifetime, and ILogger has created a FileStream and acquired a lock on it, the logger that gets created for the next category (aka Host) will fail, because it can't acquire the lock on the same file - "great" ...

So you need to cheat a little bit - and always return the same ILogger instance for all categories you want to log.

If you do that, you will find your logfile spammed by log-entries from Microsoft.* ...
So you need to only return your singleton for the categories you want to log (e.g. everything whose namespace doesn't start with Microsoft)... For all other categories, ILoggerProvider.CreateLogger can return NULL. Except that ILoggerProvider.CreateLogger CANNOT return NULL ever, because then the .NET framework explodes.

Thus, you need to create an IgnoreLogger, for all the log-categories you don't want to log...
Then you need to return the same instance (singleton) of logger all the time, for all categories, so it won't create a second instance of Logger and try to acquire a lock on the already locked logfile. Yupee.

Highlighs include, instead of using a singleton with locks, some file-loggers out there put log-statements in a queue, so they can have multiple instances writing to the same file by making the queue static, and periodically flushing that static queue to disk. Of course, if your service EXITS (e.g. crashes) before the queue has been flushed, you will be missing the exact lines in the logfile which would have told you why your service crashed there (or did otherwise funny things)... e.g. your service works fine when debugging with VS or when running on console, but fails as windows-service, because the current-directory when running as windows-serivce is C:\windows\system32, and consequently, your configuration files cannot be found/read. But although you tried to log that, you don't get the error log on that, because the queue hasn't been flushed before the program exited. And tick-tack, just like that, the day is over until you find out what the problem actually was...

So here, my implementation (i don't claim it's good, but it's as simple as it gets, and it works for me, and most importantly, IT'S NOT A <insert expletive here> TICK-TACK QUEUE):

ILoggerProvider:

namespace RamMonitor
{


    public class IgnoreLogger
      : Microsoft.Extensions.Logging.ILogger
    {

        public class IgnoreScope
            : System.IDisposable
        {
            void System.IDisposable.Dispose()
            {
            }
        }

        System.IDisposable Microsoft.Extensions.Logging.ILogger.BeginScope<TState>(TState state)
        {
            return new IgnoreScope();
        }

        bool Microsoft.Extensions.Logging.ILogger.IsEnabled(
            Microsoft.Extensions.Logging.LogLevel logLevel)
        {
            return false;
        }

        void Microsoft.Extensions.Logging.ILogger.Log<TState>(
              Microsoft.Extensions.Logging.LogLevel logLevel
            , Microsoft.Extensions.Logging.EventId eventId
            , TState state
            , System.Exception exception
            , System.Func<TState, System.Exception, string> formatter)
        { }

    }


    public class FileLoggerProvider
        : Microsoft.Extensions.Logging.ILoggerProvider
    {

        protected FileLoggerOptions m_options;
        protected IgnoreLogger m_nullLogger;
        protected FileLogger m_cachedLogger;


        public FileLoggerProvider(Microsoft.Extensions.Options.IOptions<FileLoggerOptions> fso)
        {
            this.m_options = fso.Value;
            this.m_nullLogger = new IgnoreLogger();
            this.m_cachedLogger = new FileLogger(this, this.m_options, "OneInstanceFitsAll");
        } // End Constructor 


        Microsoft.Extensions.Logging.ILogger Microsoft.Extensions.Logging.ILoggerProvider
            .CreateLogger(string categoryName)
        {
            // Microsoft.Extensions.Hosting.Internal.ApplicationLifetime
            // Microsoft.Extensions.Hosting.Internal.Host
            // Microsoft.Hosting.Lifetime
            if (categoryName.StartsWith("Microsoft", System.StringComparison.Ordinal))
                return this.m_nullLogger; // NULL is not a valid value... 

            return this.m_cachedLogger;
        } // End Function CreateLogger 



        private bool disposedValue = false; // Dient zur Erkennung redundanter Aufrufe.

        protected virtual void Dispose(bool disposing)
        {
            if (!disposedValue)
            {
                if (disposing)
                {
                    // TODO: verwalteten Zustand (verwaltete Objekte) entsorgen.
                }

                // TODO: nicht verwaltete Ressourcen (nicht verwaltete Objekte) freigeben und Finalizer weiter unten überschreiben.
                // TODO: große Felder auf Null setzen.

                disposedValue = true;
            }
        }


        // TODO: Finalizer nur überschreiben, wenn Dispose(bool disposing) weiter oben Code für die Freigabe nicht verwalteter Ressourcen enthält.
        // ~FileLoggerProvider() {
        //   // Ändern Sie diesen Code nicht. Fügen Sie Bereinigungscode in Dispose(bool disposing) weiter oben ein.
        //   Dispose(false);
        // }


        // Dieser Code wird hinzugefügt, um das Dispose-Muster richtig zu implementieren.
        void System.IDisposable.Dispose()
        {
            // Ändern Sie diesen Code nicht. Fügen Sie Bereinigungscode in Dispose(bool disposing) weiter oben ein.
            Dispose(true);
            // TODO: Auskommentierung der folgenden Zeile aufheben, wenn der Finalizer weiter oben überschrieben wird.
            // GC.SuppressFinalize(this);
        }


    } // End Class FileLoggerProvider 


}

ILogger:

// using Microsoft.Extensions.Logging;


namespace RamMonitor
{


    public class FileLogger
        : Microsoft.Extensions.Logging.ILogger
        , System.IDisposable
    {

        protected const int NUM_INDENT_SPACES = 4;

        protected object m_scopeLock;
        protected object m_lock;

        protected Microsoft.Extensions.Logging.LogLevel m_logLevel;
        protected Microsoft.Extensions.Logging.ILoggerProvider m_provider;
        protected int m_indentLevel;
        protected System.IO.TextWriter m_textWriter;

        protected System.Collections.Generic.LinkedList<object> m_scopes;

        protected System.IO.Stream m_stream;


        public FileLogger(Microsoft.Extensions.Logging.ILoggerProvider provider, FileLoggerOptions options, string categoryName)
        {
            this.m_scopeLock = new object();
            this.m_lock = new object();

            this.m_logLevel = Microsoft.Extensions.Logging.LogLevel.Trace;
            this.m_provider = provider;
            this.m_indentLevel = 0;
            this.m_scopes = new System.Collections.Generic.LinkedList<object>();
            // this.m_textWriter = System.Console.Out;

            string logDir = System.IO.Path.GetDirectoryName(options.LogFilePath);
            if (!System.IO.Directory.Exists(logDir))
                System.IO.Directory.CreateDirectory(logDir);

            this.m_stream = System.IO.File.Open(options.LogFilePath, System.IO.FileMode.Append, System.IO.FileAccess.Write, System.IO.FileShare.Read);
            this.m_textWriter = new System.IO.StreamWriter(this.m_stream, System.Text.Encoding.UTF8);
            this.m_textWriter.Flush();
            this.m_stream.Flush();
        } // End Constructor 


        protected void WriteIndent()
        {
            this.m_textWriter.Write(new string(' ', this.m_indentLevel * NUM_INDENT_SPACES));
        } // End Sub WriteIndent 


        System.IDisposable Microsoft.Extensions.Logging.ILogger.BeginScope<TState>(TState state)
        {
            FileLoggerScope<TState> scope = null;

            lock (this.m_lock)
            {
                scope = new FileLoggerScope<TState>(this, state);
                this.m_scopes.AddFirst(scope);

                this.m_indentLevel++;
                WriteIndent();
                this.m_textWriter.Write("BeginScope<TState>: ");
                this.m_textWriter.WriteLine(state);
                this.m_indentLevel++;

                // this.m_provider.ScopeProvider.Push(state);
                // throw new System.NotImplementedException();

                this.m_textWriter.Flush();
                this.m_stream.Flush();
            }

            return scope;
        } // End Function BeginScope 


        public void EndScope<TState>(TState scopeName)
        {
            lock (this.m_lock)
            {
                // FooLoggerScope<TState> scope = (FooLoggerScope<TState>)this.m_scopes.First.Value;
                this.m_indentLevel--;

                WriteIndent();
                this.m_textWriter.Write("EndScope ");
                // this.m_textWriter.WriteLine(scope.ScopeName);
                this.m_textWriter.WriteLine(scopeName);

                this.m_indentLevel--;
                this.m_scopes.RemoveFirst();

                this.m_textWriter.Flush();
                this.m_stream.Flush();
            }
        } // End Sub EndScope 


        bool Microsoft.Extensions.Logging.ILogger.IsEnabled(Microsoft.Extensions.Logging.LogLevel logLevel)
        {
            // return this.m_provider.IsEnabled(logLevel);
            return logLevel >= this.m_logLevel;
        } // End Function IsEnabled 


        void Microsoft.Extensions.Logging.ILogger.Log<TState>(
              Microsoft.Extensions.Logging.LogLevel logLevel
            , Microsoft.Extensions.Logging.EventId eventId
            , TState state
            , System.Exception exception
            , System.Func<TState, System.Exception, string> formatter)
        {

            lock (this.m_lock)
            {
                WriteIndent();
                this.m_textWriter.Write("Log<TState>: ");
                this.m_textWriter.WriteLine(state);
                this.m_textWriter.Flush();
                this.m_stream.Flush();

                System.Exception currentException = exception;

                while (currentException != null)
                {
                    WriteIndent();
                    this.m_textWriter.Write("Log<TState>.Message: ");
                    this.m_textWriter.WriteLine(exception.Message);
                    WriteIndent();
                    this.m_textWriter.Write("Log<TState>.StackTrace: ");
                    this.m_textWriter.WriteLine(exception.StackTrace);
                    this.m_textWriter.Flush();
                    this.m_stream.Flush();

                    currentException = currentException.InnerException;
                } // Whend 

            } // End Lock 

        } // End Sub Log 


        void System.IDisposable.Dispose()
        {
            this.m_textWriter.Flush();
            this.m_stream.Flush();
            this.m_textWriter.Close();
            this.m_stream.Close();
        } // End Sub Dispose 


    } // End Class FileLogger 


} // End Namespace RamMonitor 

Options:

namespace RamMonitor
{

    public class FileLoggerOptions
    {
        public FileLoggerOptions()
        { }


        public string LogFilePath { get; set; }
        
        public Microsoft.Extensions.Logging.LogLevel LogLevel { get; set; } =
            Microsoft.Extensions.Logging.LogLevel.Information;

    }

}

Extensions

using Microsoft.Extensions.DependencyInjection;
using Microsoft.Extensions.DependencyInjection.Extensions;

using Microsoft.Extensions.Logging;
using Microsoft.Extensions.Logging.Configuration;

using Microsoft.Extensions.Options;


namespace RamMonitor
{


    public static class FileLoggerExtensions
    {


        public static Microsoft.Extensions.Logging.ILoggingBuilder AddFileLogger( 
              this Microsoft.Extensions.Logging.ILoggingBuilder builder
            , System.Action<FileLoggerOptions> configure)
        {
            builder.AddConfiguration();

            builder.Services.TryAddEnumerable(Microsoft.Extensions.DependencyInjection.ServiceDescriptor.Singleton<
                    Microsoft.Extensions.Logging.ILoggerProvider,
                    FileLoggerProvider
                >()
            );

            builder.Services.TryAddEnumerable(Microsoft.Extensions.DependencyInjection.ServiceDescriptor.Singleton
                <IConfigureOptions<FileLoggerOptions>, FileLoggerOptionsSetup>());

            builder.Services.TryAddEnumerable(
                Microsoft.Extensions.DependencyInjection.ServiceDescriptor.Singleton
                <
                    IOptionsChangeTokenSource<FileLoggerOptions>,
                    LoggerProviderOptionsChangeTokenSource<FileLoggerOptions
                    , FileLoggerProvider>
                >());

            builder.Services.Configure(configure);

            return builder;
        }


    }


}

ScopeClass:

namespace RamMonitor
{

    public class FileLoggerScope<TState>
        : System.IDisposable
    {
        protected FileLogger m_logger;
        protected TState m_scopeName;


        public TState ScopeName
        {
            get
            {
                return this.m_scopeName;
            }
        } // End Property ScopeName


        public FileLoggerScope(FileLogger logger, TState scopeName)
        {
            this.m_logger = logger;
            this.m_scopeName = scopeName;
        } // End Constructor  


        void System.IDisposable.Dispose()
        {
            this.m_logger.EndScope(this.m_scopeName);
        } // End Sub Dispose 


    } // End Class FileLoggerScope 


}

OptionsSetup:

namespace RamMonitor
{


    internal class FileLoggerOptionsSetup
        : Microsoft.Extensions.Options.ConfigureFromConfigurationOptions<FileLoggerOptions>
    {

        public FileLoggerOptionsSetup(
            Microsoft.Extensions.Logging.Configuration.ILoggerProviderConfiguration<FileLoggerProvider>
            providerConfiguration
        )
            : base(providerConfiguration.Configuration)
        {
            // System.Console.WriteLine(providerConfiguration);
        }

    }


}

Note:
The scopes will not be thread-safe this way.
If you have a multi-threaded application - remove the scopes, or make it thread-safe.
The way MS implemented scopes, I can't think of a proper way to do this.
If you add a separate ScopeLock, you might get deadlocks by asynchronous calls blocking each other due to logging.

4

Most answers provided a solution using third party libraries. This made it sound that doing anything else will be very complicated. So I have decided to share this easy way of logging to a file without using a third party library. All you have to do is add these 3 classes to your project.

FileLogger:

using Microsoft.Extensions.Logging;
using System;
using System.IO;

namespace WebApp1
{
    public class FileLogger : ILogger
    {
        private string filePath;
        private static object _lock = new object();
        public FileLogger(string path)
        {
            filePath = path;
        }
        public IDisposable BeginScope<TState>(TState state)
        {
            return null;
        }

        public bool IsEnabled(LogLevel logLevel)
        {
            //return logLevel == LogLevel.Trace;
            return true;
        }

        public void Log<TState>(LogLevel logLevel, EventId eventId, TState state, Exception exception, Func<TState, Exception, string> formatter)
        {
            if (formatter != null)
            {
                lock (_lock)
                {
                    string fullFilePath = Path.Combine(filePath, DateTime.Now.ToString("yyyy-MM-dd") + "_log.txt");
                    var n = Environment.NewLine;
                    string exc = "";
                    if (exception != null) exc = exception.GetType() + ": " + exception.Message + n + exception.StackTrace + n;
                    File.AppendAllText(fullFilePath, logLevel.ToString() + ": " + DateTime.Now.ToString() + " " + formatter(state, exception) + n + exc);
                }
            }
        }
    }
}

FileLoggerProvider:

using Microsoft.Extensions.Logging;

namespace WebApp1
{
    public class FileLoggerProvider : ILoggerProvider
    {
        private string path;
        public FileLoggerProvider(string _path)
        {
            path = _path;
        }
        public ILogger CreateLogger(string categoryName)
        {
            return new FileLogger(path);
        }

        public void Dispose()
        {
        }
    }
}

FileLoggerExtensions:

using Microsoft.Extensions.Logging;

namespace WebApp1
{
    public static class FileLoggerExtensions
    {
        public static ILoggerFactory AddFile(this ILoggerFactory factory, string filePath)
        {
            factory.AddProvider(new FileLoggerProvider(filePath));
            return factory;
        }
    }
}

Add these lines to your Configure method in Startup.cs:

public void Configure(IApplicationBuilder app, IWebHostEnvironment env, ILoggerFactory loggerFactory)
{
    loggerFactory.AddFile(Path.Combine(Directory.GetCurrentDirectory(), "logs"));

    //...
}

So now you will have to create a folder called "logs" in your project. Your logs will be now written to files created for each date. You can view the created file and compare the logs with the console output.

This answer has been updated. Log file formatting has been fixed. Now it is possible to log to different files for each date.

If you don't like the implementation of my logging provider you can make your own using this info: https://www.codeproject.com/Articles/1556475/How-to-Write-a-Custom-Logging-Provider-in-ASP-NET

Note: This is simple solution and it may not be suitable for busy systems. If you need advanced logging consider using a third party logger.

2
  • It's not that simple. This code has quite a few concurrency bugs already and will end up crashing with locked file exceptions on a busy system - it creates new FileLogger instances all the time that append to the same file. The inefficient way of generating the message line means it leaks temporary strings as well. Log level filters aren't respected. Scopes are broken. Using this code in a real application will have a severe impact, especially if the developer expects the logger to not log verbose or debug messages, as it should. 2 days ago
  • This code will not work on a busy system, but it is useful for applications that don’t need advanced logging and if developers are looking for a simple solution without using a third-party library. This solution was used for a small project in my company and was capable of writing more than 200 log messages per second. Using this code never caused the application to crash. If this code doesn’t work for you, consider using a third-party library.
    – ge333
    yesterday
1

Since .Net core (2.2) does not implement this yet, still, we have to use a third party plugin for this.

If you want to log Error, Warning and etc into a txt file in a .Net Core API project. You can use what I used on my project which is called Serilog.

and you can follow the below blog to configure Serilog on your project.

http://anthonygiretti.com/2018/11/19/common-features-in-asp-net-core-2-1-webapi-logging/

1

Unfortunately, it not possible with the current version of ILogger. As @Vitaliy Fedorchenko mentioned in his post, the issue http://github.com/aspnet/Logging/issues/441 has been closed after recommending to use 3rd party file loggers. However, most of the file loggers out there are heavyweight (like Serilog) with limited configuration options. Unlike those libraries, Karambolo.Extensions.Logging.File provides an incredible functionality with a huge set of configuration options, which allows multiple logging providers with multiple files for each one.

This class library contains a lightweight implementation of the Microsoft.Extensions.Logging.ILoggerProvider interface for file logging. Runs on all .NET platforms which implement .NET Standard 2.0+ including .NET Core 2 (ASP.NET Core 2.1+) and .NET Core 3 (ASP.NET Core 3.0+).

Additional features:

  • Flexible configuration:
    • Two-level log file settings.
    • Fine-grained control over log message filtering.
  • Rolling log files with the customizable counter format.
  • Including log entry date in log file paths using templates.
  • Customizable log text formatting.
  • Extensibility by inheritance.
  • Multiple providers with different settings.

See the documentation for more informations.

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