23

Let's say I want to perform this query:

(SELECT a FROM t1 WHERE a=10 AND B=1) 
UNION ALL 
(SELECT a FROM t2 WHERE a=11 AND B=2) 
UNION ALL 
(SELECT a FROM t3 WHERE a=12 AND B=3) 
ORDER BY a LIMIT 1000;

Is MySQL smart enough to skip "t3" if 550 results are available in "t1" and 450 in "t2"?

I'm looking at MySQL docs (http://dev.mysql.com/doc/refman/5.1/en/union.html) but can't seem to find the answer.

4

As specified in UNION Syntax description (http://dev.mysql.com/doc/refman/5.1/en/union.html):

The default behavior for UNION is that duplicate rows are removed from the result. The optional DISTINCT keyword has no effect other than the default because it also specifies duplicate-row removal. With the optional ALL keyword, duplicate-row removal does not occur and the result includes all matching rows from all the SELECT statements.

I suppose, that's the answer to your question.

4
  • In the result set, does data from t1 will always be before t2 and t3 and t2 before t3? I need to read the data ordered by "B ASC" and wondering if I can skip the "order by B ASC" following the unions. – Fretre Oct 24 '10 at 14:16
  • 1
    Is specified in manual, "UNION by default produces an unordered set of rows", so, as far as I understand, there's no guarantee. – Kel Oct 24 '10 at 14:21
  • @Kel Please, advice what happens if at first use LIMIT 0,5 and on second query, for example, LIMIT 5,10? Unordered set of rows, but i hope with LIMIT 5,10 there will be no rows that where with LIMIT 0,5? Unordered, but i hope the same order for all queries? – user2360831 Nov 16 '19 at 7:06
  • As i tested sqlfiddle.com/#!9/09b72b/6 seems UNION always creates temporary table with the same order of results. And with different LIMIT i will get unique (not duplicate) results. – user2360831 Nov 16 '19 at 7:36
10

Currently, MySQL will perform all selects on a union even if there are enough rows in the first few queries, as @Yuki Inoue mentioned in their answer. Using @user1477929's answer, you could re-write your query as:

(SELECT a FROM t1 WHERE a=10 AND B=1 LIMIT 1000) 
UNION ALL 
(SELECT a FROM t2 WHERE a=11 AND B=2 LIMIT 1000) 
UNION ALL 
(SELECT a FROM t3 WHERE a=12 AND B=3 LIMIT 1000) 
ORDER BY a LIMIT 1000;

which will give you at most 1000 rows, and never scan more than 3000.

1
  • What happens if ORDER BY a LIMIT 500,1000 ? Mysql creates temporary table with 3000 results (maximum) from the three tables and then from temporary table takes 501st row? Or something else? – user2360831 Nov 16 '19 at 6:55
5

If you have a very large table, then you can execute following query to see how smart MySQL optimizer is...

(
  select * from very_large_table
  union all
  select * from very_large_table
) limit 1

Sadly, this query takes very long time, compared to following query.

select * from very_large_table limit 1

It seems that whenever result of UNION is needed, MySQL first calculates the entire temporary table of the UNION result.

version

  • MySQL 8.0.11
0
3

It works for me I'm using MySQL.

but make sure the limit number is always the same for all

in that example it gets you 3 results from each table

 (SELECT a FROM t1 WHERE a=10 AND B=1 LIMIT 9) 
 UNION ALL 
 (SELECT a FROM t2 WHERE a=11 AND B=2 LIMIT 9) 
 UNION ALL 
 (SELECT a FROM t3 WHERE a=12 AND B=3 LIMIT 9)
0

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