35

Lets say I have a Python Numpy array a.

a = numpy.array([1,2,3,4,5,6,7,8,9,10,11])

I want to create a matrix of sub sequences from this array of length 5 with stride 3. The results matrix hence will look as follows:

numpy.array([[1,2,3,4,5],[4,5,6,7,8],[7,8,9,10,11]])

One possible way of implementing this would be using a for-loop.

result_matrix = np.zeros((3, 5))
for i in range(0, len(a), 3):
  result_matrix[i] = a[i:i+5]

Is there a cleaner way to implement this in Numpy?

55

Approach #1 : Using broadcasting -

def broadcasting_app(a, L, S ):  # Window len = L, Stride len/stepsize = S
    nrows = ((a.size-L)//S)+1
    return a[S*np.arange(nrows)[:,None] + np.arange(L)]

Approach #2 : Using more efficient NumPy strides -

def strided_app(a, L, S ):  # Window len = L, Stride len/stepsize = S
    nrows = ((a.size-L)//S)+1
    n = a.strides[0]
    return np.lib.stride_tricks.as_strided(a, shape=(nrows,L), strides=(S*n,n))

Sample run -

In [143]: a
Out[143]: array([ 1,  2,  3,  4,  5,  6,  7,  8,  9, 10, 11])

In [144]: broadcasting_app(a, L = 5, S = 3)
Out[144]: 
array([[ 1,  2,  3,  4,  5],
       [ 4,  5,  6,  7,  8],
       [ 7,  8,  9, 10, 11]])

In [145]: strided_app(a, L = 5, S = 3)
Out[145]: 
array([[ 1,  2,  3,  4,  5],
       [ 4,  5,  6,  7,  8],
       [ 7,  8,  9, 10, 11]])
16
  • Thanks, I tried this : X = np.arange(100) Y = strided_app(X, 4, 1) Which gives Y as expected, and now : Z = strided_app(Y, 8, 4)# I want Z to view Y with a moving window of length 8 and step 4, but this results in junk. Can you please correct?
    – volatile
    Jan 19 '17 at 15:28
  • 3
    I have used as_strided previously but found that it caused a very serious memory leak. This isn't an issue for small arrays but even using 64 GB of RAM on a server, my python programs raised MemoryError. Highly recommend using the broadcasting_app method. Dec 9 '17 at 8:27
  • 1
    Dude this is so automagical!. I was implementing Shi-Tomasi corner detection algo where I had to create a window for each pixel and compute something complex. This method immediately gave me all the windows!!! Nov 18 '18 at 9:07
  • 1
    @kkawabat They are simply saying that we need to be careful when using it, understanding what it does. That writeable flag could be added to on the safer side. Modules like scikit-image also uses as_strided.
    – Divakar
    Oct 30 '19 at 18:09
  • 1
    @AndyL. Well input array is 1D, so n = a.strides[0] is good.
    – Divakar
    Sep 18 '20 at 5:35
3

Starting in Numpy 1.20, we can make use of the new sliding_window_view to slide/roll over windows of elements.

And coupled with a stepping [::3], it simply becomes:

from numpy.lib.stride_tricks import sliding_window_view

# values = np.array([1,2,3,4,5,6,7,8,9,10,11])
sliding_window_view(values, window_shape = 5)[::3]
# array([[ 1,  2,  3,  4,  5],
#        [ 4,  5,  6,  7,  8],
#        [ 7,  8,  9, 10, 11]])

where the intermediate result of the sliding is:

sliding_window_view(values, window_shape = 5)
# array([[ 1,  2,  3,  4,  5],
#        [ 2,  3,  4,  5,  6],
#        [ 3,  4,  5,  6,  7],
#        [ 4,  5,  6,  7,  8],
#        [ 5,  6,  7,  8,  9],
#        [ 6,  7,  8,  9, 10],
#        [ 7,  8,  9, 10, 11]])
0

Modified version of @Divakar's code with checking to ensure that memory is contiguous and that the returned array cannot be modified. (Variable names changed for my DSP application).

def frame(a, framelen, frameadv):
"""frame - Frame a 1D array
a - 1D array
framelen - Samples per frame
frameadv - Samples between starts of consecutive frames
   Set to framelen for non-overlaping consecutive frames

Modified from Divakar's 10/17/16 11:20 solution:
https://stackoverflow.com/questions/40084931/taking-subarrays-from-numpy-array-with-given-stride-stepsize

CAVEATS:
Assumes array is contiguous
Output is not writable as there are multiple views on the same memory

"""

if not isinstance(a, np.ndarray) or \
   not (a.flags['C_CONTIGUOUS'] or a.flags['F_CONTIGUOUS']):
    raise ValueError("Input array a must be a contiguous numpy array")

# Output
nrows = ((a.size-framelen)//frameadv)+1
oshape = (nrows, framelen)

# Size of each element in a
n = a.strides[0]

# Indexing in the new object will advance by frameadv * element size
ostrides = (frameadv*n, n)
return np.lib.stride_tricks.as_strided(a, shape=oshape,
                                       strides=ostrides, writeable=False)

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