18

For example, if the input list is

[1, 2, 3, 4]

I want the output to be

[(1, 2), (1, 3), (1, 4), (2, 3), (2, 4), (3, 4)]

If possible, I would like a solution which is better than the brute force method of using two for loops. How do I implement this?

3
  • 1
    There are 2^n pair-wise combinations for a collection of n elements. All solutions will require an exponential amount of time to generate all combinations; a nested for-loop is going to get you within a constant factor of the fastest solution. Unless you were simply looking for something more compact.
    – lungj
    Oct 17, 2016 at 17:40
  • @lungj It's been a while since I've studied math formally, but where are you getting that 2^n figure? Ordered pairs are 4! / (4 - 2)! (== 12) and unordered pairs are 4 choose 2 (== 6)
    – brianpck
    Oct 17, 2016 at 17:49
  • @brianpck Whoops. Yes, you're right. It's O(n^2).
    – lungj
    Oct 17, 2016 at 17:51

2 Answers 2

42

Though the previous answer will give you all pairwise orderings, the example expected result seems to imply that you want all unordered pairs.

This can be done with itertools.combinations:

>>> import itertools
>>> x = [1,2,3,4]
>>> list(itertools.combinations(x, 2))
[(1, 2), (1, 3), (1, 4), (2, 3), (2, 4), (3, 4)]

Compare to the other result:

>>> list(itertools.permutations(x, 2))
[(1, 2), (1, 3), (1, 4), (2, 1), (2, 3), (2, 4), (3, 1), (3, 2), (3, 4), (4, 1), (4, 2), (4, 3)]
6
import itertools

x = [1,2,3,4]

for each in itertools.permutations(x,2):
    print(each)

Note that itertools is a generator object, meaning you need to iterate through it to get all you want. The '2' is optional, but it tells the function what's the number per combination you want.

You can read more here

Edited:

As ForceBru said in the comment, you can unpack the generator to print, skipping the for loop together But I would still iterate through it as you might not know how big the generated object will be:

print(*itertools.permutations(x, 2))
7
  • 1
    One can do print(*itertools.permutations(x, 2)) in Python 3.x, which is even shorter.
    – ForceBru
    Oct 17, 2016 at 17:42
  • @ForceBru Good point, unpacking it, I guess I can add it to the answer too, but I was thinking that there must be a reason why OP needs to generate these (thinking maybe OP will use them in another function call or something)
    – MooingRawr
    Oct 17, 2016 at 17:44
  • @ForceBru permutations returns an iterator, but I'm pretty sure that unpacking it is going to create a (potentially large) object which might actually slow the whole process down (esp. if swapping becomes required).
    – lungj
    Oct 17, 2016 at 17:55
  • @lungj Given that this is a standard library solution, I really don't expect you're going to get better performance using another method.
    – brianpck
    Oct 17, 2016 at 18:00
  • 1
    Except that this does not give the desired output. You need itertools.combinations instead. Oct 17, 2016 at 18:10

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