718

How can I count the number of times a particular string occurs in another string. For example, this is what I am trying to do in Javascript:

var temp = "This is a string.";
alert(temp.count("is")); //should output '2'
4
  • 20
    It depends on whether you accept overlapping instances, e.g. var t = "sss"; How many instances of the substring "ss" are in the string above? 1 or 2? Do you leapfrog over each instance, or move the pointer character-by-character, looking for the substring?
    – Tim
    Oct 24 '10 at 19:30
  • 4
    An improved benchmark for this question's answers: jsperf.com/string-ocurrence-split-vs-match/2 (based of Kazzkiq's benchmark).
    – idmean
    May 27 '15 at 15:08
  • Count Total Amount Of Specific Word In a String JavaScript stackoverflow.com/a/65036248/4752258 Nov 29 '20 at 18:57
  • this video seems vaguely related here - "Google Coding Interview With A Facebook Software Engineer" - youtube.com/watch?v=PIeiiceWe_w
    – Deryck
    Dec 13 '20 at 9:07

35 Answers 35

1218

The g in the regular expression (short for global) says to search the whole string rather than just find the first occurrence. This matches is twice:

var temp = "This is a string.";
var count = (temp.match(/is/g) || []).length;
console.log(count);

And, if there are no matches, it returns 0:

var temp = "Hello World!";
var count = (temp.match(/is/g) || []).length;
console.log(count);

21
  • 4
    modern and elegant, but Vitimtk's solution is much more efficient. what do you all think of his code?
    – TruMan1
    Nov 4 '11 at 2:15
  • 5
    This answers the question best. If someone asked "How can I do this 10x faster in special case (without regexps)" Vitimtk would win that question.
    – Dzhaughn
    Mar 16 '12 at 9:52
  • 126
    Thanks for this.. I went with count = (str.match(/is/g) || []).length to handle if you don't have a match.
    – Matt
    Oct 29 '12 at 12:19
  • 8
    I don't think this answer match properly the question, because it doesn't take a string as argument to match, as the use case describe. Sure, you can create dynamically the regexp using RegExp constructor and passing the string you're looking for, but in that case you have to escape all the metacharacters. In that scenario, a pure string approach is preferable.
    – ZER0
    Apr 9 '13 at 1:47
  • 3
    Matt's answer should be in the answer!
    – Senči
    Nov 13 '13 at 15:20
258
/** Function that count occurrences of a substring in a string;
 * @param {String} string               The string
 * @param {String} subString            The sub string to search for
 * @param {Boolean} [allowOverlapping]  Optional. (Default:false)
 *
 * @author Vitim.us https://gist.github.com/victornpb/7736865
 * @see Unit Test https://jsfiddle.net/Victornpb/5axuh96u/
 * @see http://stackoverflow.com/questions/4009756/how-to-count-string-occurrence-in-string/7924240#7924240
 */
function occurrences(string, subString, allowOverlapping) {

    string += "";
    subString += "";
    if (subString.length <= 0) return (string.length + 1);

    var n = 0,
        pos = 0,
        step = allowOverlapping ? 1 : subString.length;

    while (true) {
        pos = string.indexOf(subString, pos);
        if (pos >= 0) {
            ++n;
            pos += step;
        } else break;
    }
    return n;
}

Usage

occurrences("foofoofoo", "bar"); //0

occurrences("foofoofoo", "foo"); //3

occurrences("foofoofoo", "foofoo"); //1

allowOverlapping

occurrences("foofoofoo", "foofoo", true); //2

Matches:

  foofoofoo
1 `----´
2    `----´

Unit Test

Benchmark

I've made a benchmark test and my function is more then 10 times faster then the regexp match function posted by gumbo. In my test string is 25 chars length. with 2 occurences of the character 'o'. I executed 1 000 000 times in Safari.

Safari 5.1

Benchmark> Total time execution: 5617 ms (regexp)

Benchmark> Total time execution: 881 ms (my function 6.4x faster)

Firefox 4

Benchmark> Total time execution: 8547 ms (Rexexp)

Benchmark> Total time execution: 634 ms (my function 13.5x faster)


Edit: changes I've made

  • cached substring length

  • added type-casting to string.

  • added optional 'allowOverlapping' parameter

  • fixed correct output for "" empty substring case.

Gist
19
  • 6
    I repeated this test in Safari 5 and got similar results with a small (100b) string, but with a larger string (16kb), the regex ran faster for me. For one iteration (not 1,000,000), the difference was less than a millisecond anyway, so my vote goes to the regex.
    – arlomedia
    Apr 4 '12 at 23:04
  • 2
    +1, but you are checking substring.length on almost every loop, you should consider caching it outside the while
    – ajax333221
    Jun 6 '12 at 23:22
  • 1
    @ajax333221 OMG you read my mind, I did this improvement a few days ago, and I was going to edit my answer jsperf.com/count-string-occurrence-in-string
    – Vitim.us
    Jun 7 '12 at 3:24
  • 5
    I found your code in use here: success-equation.com/mind_reader.html . Really nice the programmer minded putting a reference there.
    – Bruno Kim
    Oct 9 '12 at 2:57
  • 3
    @DanielZuzevich it will coerce the types to String, in case you do occurrences(11,1) //2 and it would still work. (It is faster doing this way instead of checking for types and calling toString())
    – Vitim.us
    Jun 7 '17 at 18:52
151
function countInstances(string, word) {
   return string.split(word).length - 1;
}
6
  • 5
    @Antal - Looks like a bug in the previous beta build of chrome, works after updating to latest, I'd still steer clear of this method though. Oct 24 '10 at 19:59
  • 33
    This looks like a perfectly valid solution to me. Mar 6 '15 at 9:36
  • 2
    @NickCraver out of curiosity, why do you want to steer clear of this method? (other than bug in your beta browser)
    – Jonny Lin
    Apr 21 '15 at 17:48
  • 6
    @JonnyLin it creates unnecessary allocations you immediately throw away when alternatives do not - potentially very large ones depending on the data. Jul 7 '15 at 0:16
  • @jakekimds just a bad paste of output in the comment - it was an argument bug both in the processing and output of repeated args in that chrome build. Jul 7 '15 at 0:19
102

You can try this:

var theString = "This is a string.";
console.log(theString.split("is").length - 1);

5
  • 18
    +1 for the simplicity and because accordingly to my tests this solution runs ~10x faster than the others! May 18 '15 at 14:23
  • For example I have two "is" how do you get the position of each?
    – rapidoodle
    Oct 28 '16 at 2:50
  • As discussed in @Orbit 's answer, people are getting different results on older versions of Chrome. I would perhaps be a little cautious using this method.
    – mgthomas99
    Dec 9 '16 at 15:13
  • And you can also use it with variables: theString.split(myvar).length - 1 which you cant with simple regex
    – Steffan
    Nov 6 '17 at 21:53
  • 10
    This is @Orbit 's answer three years later...
    – aloisdg
    Oct 16 '18 at 9:23
35

My solution:

var temp = "This is a string.";

function countOcurrences(str, value) {
  var regExp = new RegExp(value, "gi");
  return (str.match(regExp) || []).length;
}

console.log(countOcurrences(temp, 'is'));

2
  • 5
    maybe it would be better to return (str.match(regExp) || []).length; That way you don't evaluate the regular expression twice?
    – aikeru
    Dec 7 '13 at 4:08
  • 4
    you also need to scape your string or countOcurrences('Hello...','.')==8 and not 3
    – Vitim.us
    May 9 '14 at 3:16
20

You can use match to define such function:

String.prototype.count = function(search) {
    var m = this.match(new RegExp(search.toString().replace(/(?=[.\\+*?[^\]$(){}\|])/g, "\\"), "g"));
    return m ? m.length:0;
}
2
  • 1
    If you wanted it to be uniform with JS's search semantics, the return line would be return m ? m.length:-1;. Dec 20 '14 at 3:13
  • This is better than the other regex solutions above, because they cause an error if the string to count the occurrences of is "[" or anything with a special meaning in Regex.
    – user6560716
    Feb 25 '17 at 16:03
13

Just code-golfing Rebecca Chernoff's solution :-)

alert(("This is a string.".match(/is/g) || []).length);
0
12

The non-regex version:

 var string = 'This is a string',
    searchFor = 'is',
    count = 0,
    pos = string.indexOf(searchFor);

while (pos > -1) {
    ++count;
    pos = string.indexOf(searchFor, ++pos);
}

console.log(count);   // 2

2
  • 1. It's only for single char search, too subtle 2. even OP asks for is occurences
    – vladkras
    May 20 '16 at 5:57
  • 2
    This is probably the fastest implementation here, but it would be even faster if you replaced "++pos" with "pos+=searchFor.length"
    – hanshenrik
    Apr 1 '19 at 13:43
11

String.prototype.Count = function (find) {
    return this.split(find).length - 1;
}

console.log("This is a string.".Count("is"));

This will return 2.

1
  • 4
    This is @Orbit 's answer six years later...
    – aloisdg
    Oct 16 '18 at 9:25
8

Here is the fastest function!

Why is it faster?

  • Doesn't check char by char (with 1 exception)
  • Uses a while and increments 1 var (the char count var) vs. a for loop checking the length and incrementing 2 vars (usually var i and a var with the char count)
  • Uses WAY less vars
  • Doesn't use regex!
  • Uses an (hopefully) highly optimized function
  • All operations are as combined as they can be, avoiding slowdowns due to multiple operations

    String.prototype.timesCharExist=function(c){var t=0,l=0,c=(c+'')[0];while(l=this.indexOf(c,l)+1)++t;return t};
    

Here is a slower and more readable version:

    String.prototype.timesCharExist = function ( chr ) {
        var total = 0, last_location = 0, single_char = ( chr + '' )[0];
        while( last_location = this.indexOf( single_char, last_location ) + 1 )
        {
            total = total + 1;
        }
        return total;
    };

This one is slower because of the counter, long var names and misuse of 1 var.

To use it, you simply do this:

    'The char "a" only shows up twice'.timesCharExist('a');

Edit: (2013/12/16)

DON'T use with Opera 12.16 or older! it will take almost 2.5x more than the regex solution!

On chrome, this solution will take between 14ms and 20ms for 1,000,000 characters.

The regex solution takes 11-14ms for the same amount.

Using a function (outside String.prototype) will take about 10-13ms.

Here is the code used:

    String.prototype.timesCharExist=function(c){var t=0,l=0,c=(c+'')[0];while(l=this.indexOf(c,l)+1)++t;return t};

    var x=Array(100001).join('1234567890');

    console.time('proto');x.timesCharExist('1');console.timeEnd('proto');

    console.time('regex');x.match(/1/g).length;console.timeEnd('regex');

    var timesCharExist=function(x,c){var t=0,l=0,c=(c+'')[0];while(l=x.indexOf(c,l)+1)++t;return t;};

    console.time('func');timesCharExist(x,'1');console.timeEnd('func');

The result of all the solutions should be 100,000!

Note: if you want this function to count more than 1 char, change where is c=(c+'')[0] into c=c+''

1
  • 1
    the prototype was AN EXAMPLE! You can use the function as you please! You can even do this: var timesFunctionExist=function(x,c){var t=0,l=0,c=(c+'')[0];while(l=x.indexOf(c,l)+1)++t;return t}); alert(timesCharExist('The char "a" only shows up twice','a'));! (this will speed up a little more cause i wont be messing with prototypes). If you think I'm wrong, why don't you show it before throwing rocks at me? Prove to me that my function sucks and i will accept it. Show me a test case. And the length of vars does have influence on speed. You can test it. Oct 8 '13 at 11:02
7

var temp = "This is a string.";
console.log((temp.match(new RegExp("is", "g")) || []).length);

4

I think the purpose for regex is much different from indexOf. indexOf simply find the occurance of a certain string while in regex you can use wildcards like [A-Z] which means it will find any capital character in the word without stating the actual character.

Example:

 var index = "This is a string".indexOf("is");
 console.log(index);
 var length = "This is a string".match(/[a-z]/g).length;
 // where [a-z] is a regex wildcard expression thats why its slower
 console.log(length);

3

Super duper old, but I needed to do something like this today and only thought to check SO afterwards. Works pretty fast for me.

String.prototype.count = function(substr,start,overlap) {
    overlap = overlap || false;
    start = start || 0;

    var count = 0, 
        offset = overlap ? 1 : substr.length;

    while((start = this.indexOf(substr, start) + offset) !== (offset - 1))
        ++count;
    return count;
};
3
       var myString = "This is a string.";
        var foundAtPosition = 0;
        var Count = 0;
        while (foundAtPosition != -1)
        {
            foundAtPosition = myString.indexOf("is",foundAtPosition);
            if (foundAtPosition != -1)
            {
                Count++;
                foundAtPosition++;
            }
        }
        document.write("There are " + Count + " occurrences of the word IS");

Refer :- count a substring appears in the string for step by step explanation.

3

Building upon @Vittim.us answer above. I like the control his method gives me, making it easy to extend, but I needed to add case insensitivity and limit matches to whole words with support for punctuation. (e.g. "bath" is in "take a bath." but not "bathing")

The punctuation regex came from: https://stackoverflow.com/a/25575009/497745 (How can I strip all punctuation from a string in JavaScript using regex?)

function keywordOccurrences(string, subString, allowOverlapping, caseInsensitive, wholeWord)
{

    string += "";
    subString += "";
    if (subString.length <= 0) return (string.length + 1); //deal with empty strings

    if(caseInsensitive)
    {            
        string = string.toLowerCase();
        subString = subString.toLowerCase();
    }

    var n = 0,
        pos = 0,
        step = allowOverlapping ? 1 : subString.length,
        stringLength = string.length,
        subStringLength = subString.length;

    while (true)
    {
        pos = string.indexOf(subString, pos);
        if (pos >= 0)
        {
            var matchPos = pos;
            pos += step; //slide forward the position pointer no matter what

            if(wholeWord) //only whole word matches are desired
            {
                if(matchPos > 0) //if the string is not at the very beginning we need to check if the previous character is whitespace
                {                        
                    if(!/[\s\u2000-\u206F\u2E00-\u2E7F\\'!"#$%&\(\)*+,\-.\/:;<=>?@\[\]^_`{|}~]/.test(string[matchPos - 1])) //ignore punctuation
                    {
                        continue; //then this is not a match
                    }
                }

                var matchEnd = matchPos + subStringLength;
                if(matchEnd < stringLength - 1)
                {                        
                    if (!/[\s\u2000-\u206F\u2E00-\u2E7F\\'!"#$%&\(\)*+,\-.\/:;<=>?@\[\]^_`{|}~]/.test(string[matchEnd])) //ignore punctuation
                    {
                        continue; //then this is not a match
                    }
                }
            }

            ++n;                
        } else break;
    }
    return n;
}

Please feel free to modify and refactor this answer if you spot bugs or improvements.

3

For anyone that finds this thread in the future, note that the accepted answer will not always return the correct value if you generalize it, since it will choke on regex operators like $ and .. Here's a better version, that can handle any needle:

function occurrences (haystack, needle) {
  var _needle = needle
    .replace(/\[/g, '\\[')
    .replace(/\]/g, '\\]')
  return (
    haystack.match(new RegExp('[' + _needle + ']', 'g')) || []
  ).length
}
3

A simple way would be to split the string on the required word, the word for which we want to calculate the number of occurences, and subtract 1 from the number of parts:

function checkOccurences(string, word) {
      return string.split(word).length - 1;
}
const text="Let us see. see above, see below, see forward, see backward, see left, see right until we will be right"; 
const count=countOccurences(text,"see "); // 2
1
  • Simple and elegant!
    – lukas84
    Oct 1 at 7:56
2

Try it

<?php 
$str = "33,33,56,89,56,56";
echo substr_count($str, '56');
?>

<script type="text/javascript">
var temp = "33,33,56,89,56,56";
var count = temp.match(/56/g);  
alert(count.length);
</script>
2

Simple version without regex:

var temp = "This is a string.";

var count = (temp.split('is').length - 1);

alert(count);

1
  • 5
    This is @Orbit 's answer six years later...
    – aloisdg
    Oct 16 '18 at 9:25
2

No one will ever see this, but it's good to bring back recursion and arrow functions once in a while (pun gloriously intended)

String.prototype.occurrencesOf = function(s, i) {
 return (n => (n === -1) ? 0 : 1 + this.occurrencesOf(s, n + 1))(this.indexOf(s, (i || 0)));
};
1
1

Now this is a very old thread i've come across but as many have pushed their answer's, here is mine in a hope to help someone with this simple code.

var search_value = "This is a dummy sentence!";
var letter = 'a'; /*Can take any letter, have put in a var if anyone wants to use this variable dynamically*/
letter = letter && "string" === typeof letter ? letter : "";
var count;
for (var i = count = 0; i < search_value.length; count += (search_value[i++] == letter));
console.log(count);

I'm not sure if it is the fastest solution but i preferred it for simplicity and for not using regex (i just don't like using them!)

0
1
 function substrCount( str, x ) {
   let count = -1, pos = 0;
   do {
     pos = str.indexOf( x, pos ) + 1;
     count++;
   } while( pos > 0 );
   return count;
 }
1

ES2020 offers a new MatchAll which might be of use in this particular context.

Here we create a new RegExp, please ensure you pass 'g' into the function.

Convert the result using Array.from and count the length, which returns 2 as per the original requestor's desired output.

let strToCheck = RegExp('is', 'g')
let matchesReg = "This is a string.".matchAll(strToCheck)
console.log(Array.from(matchesReg).length) // 2

0

var countInstances = function(body, target) {
  var globalcounter = 0;
  var concatstring  = '';
  for(var i=0,j=target.length;i<body.length;i++){
    concatstring = body.substring(i-1,j);
    
    if(concatstring === target){
       globalcounter += 1;
       concatstring = '';
    }
  }
  
  
  return globalcounter;
 
};

console.log(   countInstances('abcabc', 'abc')   ); // ==> 2
console.log(   countInstances('ababa', 'aba')   ); // ==> 2
console.log(   countInstances('aaabbb', 'ab')   ); // ==> 1

0

substr_count translated to Javascript from php


function substr_count (haystack, needle, offset, length) { 
  // eslint-disable-line camelcase
  //  discuss at: https://locutus.io/php/substr_count/
  // original by: Kevin van Zonneveld (https://kvz.io)
  // bugfixed by: Onno Marsman (https://twitter.com/onnomarsman)
  // improved by: Brett Zamir (https://brett-zamir.me)
  // improved by: Thomas
  //   example 1: substr_count('Kevin van Zonneveld', 'e')
  //   returns 1: 3
  //   example 2: substr_count('Kevin van Zonneveld', 'K', 1)
  //   returns 2: 0
  //   example 3: substr_count('Kevin van Zonneveld', 'Z', 0, 10)
  //   returns 3: false

  var cnt = 0

  haystack += ''
  needle += ''
  if (isNaN(offset)) {
    offset = 0
  }
  if (isNaN(length)) {
    length = 0
  }
  if (needle.length === 0) {
    return false
  }
  offset--

  while ((offset = haystack.indexOf(needle, offset + 1)) !== -1) {
    if (length > 0 && (offset + needle.length) > length) {
      return false
    }
    cnt++
  }

  return cnt
}

Check out Locutus's Translation Of Php's substr_count function

0

You could try this

let count = s.length - s.replace(/is/g, "").length;
0

The parameters: ustring: the superset string countChar: the substring

A function to count substring occurrence in JavaScript:

function subStringCount(ustring, countChar){
  var correspCount = 0;
  var corresp = false;
  var amount = 0;
  var prevChar = null;
  
 for(var i=0; i!=ustring.length; i++){

     if(ustring.charAt(i) == countChar.charAt(0) && corresp == false){
       corresp = true;
       correspCount += 1;
       if(correspCount == countChar.length){
         amount+=1;
         corresp = false;
         correspCount = 0;
       }
       prevChar = 1;
     }
     else if(ustring.charAt(i) == countChar.charAt(prevChar) && corresp == true){
       correspCount += 1;
       if(correspCount == countChar.length){
         amount+=1;
         corresp = false;
         correspCount = 0;
         prevChar = null;
       }else{
         prevChar += 1 ;
       }
     }else{
       corresp = false;
       correspCount = 0;
     }
 } 
 return amount;
}

console.log(subStringCount('Hello World, Hello World', 'll'));

0

var str = 'stackoverflow';
var arr = Array.from(str);
console.log(arr);

for (let a = 0; a <= arr.length; a++) {
  var temp = arr[a];
  var c = 0;
  for (let b = 0; b <= arr.length; b++) {
    if (temp === arr[b]) {
      c++;
    }

  }
  console.log(`the ${arr[a]} is counted for ${c}`)
}

1
  • Please don't post only code as an answer, but also provide an explanation of what your code does and how it solves the problem of the question. Answers with an explanation are usually more helpful and of better quality, and are more likely to attract upvotes Dec 13 '20 at 9:23
0

Iterate less the second time (just when first letter of substring matches) but still uses 2 for loops:

   function findSubstringOccurrences(str, word) {
        let occurrences = 0;
        for(let i=0; i<str.length; i++){
            if(word[0] === str[i]){ // to make it faster and iterate less
                for(let j=0; j<word.length; j++){
                    if(str[i+j] !== word[j]) break;
                    if(j === word.length - 1) occurrences++;
                }
            }
        }
        return occurrences;
    }
    
    console.log(findSubstringOccurrences("jdlfkfomgkdjfomglo", "omg"));
0
//Try this code

const countSubStr = (str, search) => {
    let arrStr = str.split('');
    let i = 0, count = 0;

    while(i < arrStr.length){
        let subStr = i + search.length + 1 <= arrStr.length ?
                  arrStr.slice(i, i+search.length).join('') :
                  arrStr.slice(i).join('');
        if(subStr === search){
            count++;
            arrStr.splice(i, search.length);
        }else{
            i++;
        }
    }
    return count;
  }

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