45

Is it possible to add noise to a gradient in CSS?

Here is my code for a radial gradient:

body {
    color: #575757;
    font: 14px/21px Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif;
    background-color: #2f3b4b;
    background: -moz-radial-gradient(center 45deg, circle closest-corner, #2f3b4b 0%, #3e4f63 100%);
    background: -webkit-gradient(radial, center center, 10, center center, 900, from(#2f3b4b), to(#3e4f63));
}

What would I add to that to have noise on top of it, to give it texture?

  • why you weren't add normal radial-gradient? – dgknca Jul 31 at 15:23
22

There's no current way in css to add 'noise' to a background.

An alternative solution would be to create a transparent noise png in your graphic editor. Then apply that graphic as a background to a <div>. You would then need to place that <div> over the entire area of the <body> which should then give an appearance of a gradient with noise.

  • 9
    Or use multiple background images, the upmost one being your noise PNG. Browsers supporting gradients often support those, too. – DanMan Oct 30 '10 at 16:10
  • 5
    In my opinion, overlaying noise doesn't look as nice as real noise. It would be better if the noise overlay would be blended using a "multiply" mode, but CSS doesn't support that. But the alternative of using a huge image of a gradient with noise isn't perfect either, as images with noise don't compress very well... – Jakob Egger Feb 15 '11 at 19:46
  • This tutorial explains the process – just__matt Jan 11 '12 at 22:02
  • Can we do this with filters? – Costa Mar 27 '17 at 20:25
66

This is by far the most hassle free and best way to implement this. It is purely CSS and very very simple to do, no extra files - nothing. Ok, it's not the best way possible, but it works very well, very reliable (never failed when testing across very old browsers) and very fast to load.

Found it a few months ago, and used it ever since, simply copy and paste this code in to your CSS.

background-image: url(data:image/png;base64,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);

Then add your background color

background-color:#0094d0;

Demo: JSFiddle

Source: https://coderwall.com/p/m-uwvg

  • 2
    This is now (in 2013) more correct than all the other answers. – Amalgovinus Mar 21 '13 at 18:48
  • What exactly happens in the url() part of the code? Is there a way to customize the granularity and other parameters? – tobias47n9e Oct 5 '16 at 11:01
  • @tobias47n9e the data within in the URL part is just a small image. You could change that to any image URI data (google "convert image to URI). Note it is uri data you want or urL! – tim.baker Oct 5 '16 at 11:26
  • @tim.baker Awesome. Thanks! – tobias47n9e Oct 5 '16 at 11:36
  • 2
    @corysimmons That's incorrect. To use it with a gradient, simply append a comma and the gradient in the same background-image property. – Orbit Oct 1 '17 at 17:30
12

For the sake of novelty, here is some pure CSS noise without using a data URI (although it seems to only work in webkit):

#box {
  width:250px;
  height:250px;
  position:relative;
  background-size:55px 10px;
  background-repeat: repeat;
  background-image: -webkit-repeating-radial-gradient(1% 21%, closest-corner, rgba(255,0,255,.5), rgba(0,255,255,.5), rgba(0,0,0,1) 1.7%), -webkit-repeating-radial-gradient(51% 51%, closest-corner, rgba(255,255,255,1), rgba(255,255,255,1), rgba(0,255,0,1) 10%); 
}
#box::before {
  content:'';
  width:100%;
  height:100%;
  position:absolute;
  mix-blend-mode:exclusion;
  background-size:12px 22px;
  background-repeat: repeat;
  background-image: -webkit-repeating-radial-gradient(61% 21%, closest-corner, rgba(255,255,255,1), rgba(0,255,0,.5), rgba(3,0,255,1) 20%),  -webkit-repeating-radial-gradient(91% 51%, closest-corner, rgba(255,255,255,1), rgba(255,255,1,.5), rgba(055,255,255,1) 20%);
  left:0;
  z-index:998;
}
#box::after {
  content:'';
  width:100%;
  height:100%;
  position:absolute;
  mix-blend-mode:exclusion;
  background-size:15px 13px;
  background-repeat: repeat;
  background-image: -webkit-repeating-radial-gradient(21% 21%, closest-corner, rgba(255,255,255,1), rgba(0,0,255,.5), rgba(3,0,255,1) 20%);
  left:0;
  top:0;
  z-index:999;
}
<div id="box"></div>

10

Creating Textures (Noise) Using SVG Filters & CSS Gradients

You want noise in your gradient? You're in luck!

Perlin noise is a type of gradient noise. The SVG standard specifies a filter primitive called <feTurbulence>, which implements the Perlin function. It allows the synthesis of artificial textures like clouds or marble—the noise you want.

Step 1: Define an SVG Graphic

Create a small SVG file called noise.svg.

<svg
  xmlns='http://www.w3.org/2000/svg'
  xmlns:xlink='http://www.w3.org/1999/xlink'
  width='300' height='300'>

    <filter id='n' x='0' y='0'>
            <feTurbulence
              type='fractalNoise'
              baseFrequency='0.75'
              stitchTiles='stitch'/>
    </filter>

    <rect width='300' height='300' fill='#fff'/>
    <rect width='300' height='300' filter="url(#n)" opacity='0.80'/>
</svg>

This graphic defines two rectangles. The first is filled with a solid color. The second is translucent with the noise filter applied. The second rectangle is overlayed on the first to provide a noise effect.

SVG Options

  1. Fist and most obvious is that you can change the dimensions of the graphic. However, the CSS background-repeat property can be used to fill an element, thus 300×300 should suffice.

  2. The filter's type attribute can be fractalNoise or turbulence, which specifies the filter function. Both provide a different visual, but in my opinion, the noise filter is a little more subtle.

  3. The filter's baseFrequency attribute can range from 0.5–0.9 to provide a course to fine texture, respectively. This range is visually optimal for either filter in my opinion.

  4. The first rectangle's fill can be changed to provide a different base color. Later, however, we essentially combine this color with a translucent CSS gradient, which also defines a color(s). So white is a good starting point here.

  5. The second rectangle's opacity can range from 0.2–0.9 to set the filter intensity, where a higher number increases the intensity.

At this point, you could tweak the aforementioned options, set this noise graphic as a background image via CSS, and call it a day. But if you want a gradient, like the OP, go to Step 2.

Step 2: Apply a CSS Gradient

Using the background-image property, you can set the SVG noise graphic as the background on any element and overlay a gradient. In this example, I'll apply the noise graphic to the entire body and overlay a linear gradient.

body {
    /* white to black linear noise gradient spanning from top to bottom */
    background:
      linear-gradient(rgba(255,255,255,.5), rgba(0,0,0,.5)),
      url('noise.svg');
}

The linear-gradient() function creates a pseudo image, which is stacked on top of noise.svg. The result is a translucent gradient with our noise showing through it.

CSS Options

  1. First, and most obvious, is that the defined gradient colors can be changed. However, if you want a solid color without a gradient, make the two end-point colors equal. The benefit is that you can use the same noise graphic with or without a gradient throughout a site or among projects.

  2. Multiple images, created with the *-gradient() functions, can be overlayed on the noise graphic and more than two color parameters and angles can be specified in a single gradient function to provide all kinds of cool visuals.

  3. The opacity of the gradient parameters—i.e. rgba() and hsla()—can be increased to intensify the defined color and reduce the noise level. Again, 0.2–0.9 is an ideal range.

Conclusion

This is a highly customizable and very light-weight (~400 bytes) solution that allows you to simply define noise of any color or gradient. Although there are several knobs to turn here, this is only the beginning. There are other SVG filter primitives, such as <feGaussianBlur> and <feColorMatrix>, which can provide additional results.

8

Yes, there's currently no CSS-based approach for noise textures. If you're hell-bent on a programmatic (rather than image-based) approach, though, you could try using HTML5 canvas. There's a tutorial here on how to generate noise using JavaScript --> Creating Noise in HTML5 Canvas

However, doing the Canvas approach will result in a much slower experience for your visitors, because A) JavaScript is an interpreted language, and B) writing graphics using JS is extra slow.

So, unless you're trying to make a point by using HTML5, I'd stick with an image. It'll be faster (for you to make and for your users to load), and you'll have a finer degree of control over the appearance.

  • in certain cases (esp. on mobile where http-requests are even more expensive) it works even faster than actual loading! – Misha Reyzlin Jul 5 '11 at 15:17
  • 1
    Or you could base-64 the image. HTTP requests aren't necessarily required. – derrylwc Oct 27 '11 at 23:27
  • 1
    I had a measured use-case where an image with noise texture, 80x80, was weighing 10kb and after base64 it would add about 14kb of text to the css – that wasn't acceptable. In JS it's about 20 lines of code and it works fast enough (and faster than to load these 14kb of text over slow network). – Misha Reyzlin Oct 28 '11 at 7:31
  • Definitely a good justification to use JS. Although 10kb seems a bit steep! 40x40 pixels should provide plenty entropy for a repeatable noise texture, and comes in under 2kb. It all comes down to your particular situation. – derrylwc Oct 31 '11 at 22:01
  • You can use CSS to do this :/ – tim.baker Oct 4 '13 at 0:58
7

While this doesn't qualify as true noise, a pure CSS3 approach would be using multiple repeating-linear-background selectors, which are often used in pattern generators.

Here are a few examples:

With some right combination of backgrounds, angles, color stops, and transparency, a reasonable noise-like effect should be achievable :)

Hope that sets you in the right direction anyways...

2

It is not possible (even if it was, it'd take a crapton of code tricks to do so) to generate noise textures using CSS alone. There aren't any new CSS3 properties that provide that sort of effect out of the box. A much quicker solution is to use a graphic editor such as Photoshop to do that.

  • so would you suggest creating a texture in photoshop and repeating x and y? – austin Oct 25 '10 at 0:14
  • 1
    @austin: Yeah. You can either create the noise as a repeating transparent PNG alone and place it as a background-image, or include the radial gradient in your image instead and make it non-repeat, although it's more compatible you have to keep it an exact size. – BoltClock Oct 25 '10 at 0:17
0

I found a way without any image with radial-gradient and only one div.

Firstly I want to show an example with radial-gradient. Let's say we want to create a circle at coordinates we want. First circle is x=120 y=80, second circle is x=20 y=20. To better understand the function we will write below, we can consider this example.

.a {
border:1px solid blue;
  width:500px;
  height:200px;
  background: radial-gradient(circle at 120px 80px, red 0px 10px, transparent 10px 100px);
}

.b {
border:1px solid red;
  width:500px;
  height:200px;
  background: radial-gradient(circle at 20px 20px, blue 0px 10px, transparent 10px 100px);
}
<div class="a"></div>
<div class="b"></div>

We are going to write a @mixin function for thousands line gradients.

A SCSS function:

@mixin gradient($color, $width, $height, $noiseCount) {
  $value: ();
  @for $i from 1 through $noiseCount {
    $gradient: radial-gradient(
      circle at #{random($width)}px #{random($height)}px,
      $color 0px,
      $color 1px,
      transparent 1px,
      transparent 100%
    );
    $value: append($value, $gradient, comma);
  }
  background: $value;
}

Usage:

div {
  width:400px;
  height: 150px;
  @include gradient(#ffad3e, 400, 150, 2500);
}

Result

If we want to create noises according to % value?

We can use this function for this.

@mixin gradient($color, $width, $height, $noiseCount) {
  $value: ();
  @for $i from 1 through $noiseCount {
    $gradient: radial-gradient(
      circle at #{(random($width * 10)) / 10}% #{random($height)}px,
      $color 0px,
      $color 1px,
      transparent 1px,
      transparent 100%
    );
    $value: append($value, $gradient, comma);
  }
  background: $value;
}

div {
  width:100%;
  height: 150px;
  @include gradient(#ffad3e, 100, 150, 2500);
}

Result

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