41

How do I get environment variables from elastic beanstalk into an asp.net core mvc application? I have added a .ebextensions folder with app.config file in it with the following:

option_settings:
- option_name: HelloWorld
  value: placeholder

- option_name: ASPNETCORE_ENVIRONMENT
  value: placeholder

The .ebextensions folder is included in the publish package.

On deployment, both the variables are visible in the aws elasticbeanstalk console at Configuration > Software Configuration > Environment Variables

However, when I try to read the variables in the application, none of the below options are working:

Environment.GetEnvironmentVariable("HelloWorld") // In controller
Configuration["HelloWorld"] // In startup.cs

Any ideas on what I could be missing? Thanks.

1

10 Answers 10

46

I just implemented a slightly other solution which injects the beanstalk environment variables to the program so that you may access them by Environment.GetEnvironmentVariable():

private static void SetEbConfig()
{
    var tempConfigBuilder = new ConfigurationBuilder();

    tempConfigBuilder.AddJsonFile(
        @"C:\Program Files\Amazon\ElasticBeanstalk\config\containerconfiguration",
        optional: true,
        reloadOnChange: true
    );

    var configuration = tempConfigBuilder.Build();

    var ebEnv =
        configuration.GetSection("iis:env")
            .GetChildren()
            .Select(pair => pair.Value.Split(new[] { '=' }, 2))
            .ToDictionary(keypair => keypair[0], keypair => keypair[1]);

    foreach (var keyVal in ebEnv)
    {
        Environment.SetEnvironmentVariable(keyVal.Key, keyVal.Value);
    }
}

Simply call SetEbConfig(); before building your webhost. With this solution, also AWS SDK does read it's settings like AWS_ACCESS_KEY_ID correctly.

9
  • 4
    Apparently the Elastic Beanstalk issue is not yet fixed. Your solution was extremely helpful to get my code deployed and working quickly! Feb 6, 2018 at 12:52
  • 2
    Thank you very much, this is the most generic and elegant solution! Apr 11, 2018 at 17:30
  • 2
    After wasting a lot of time searching for a fix I found your solution and I'm very happy to find it. It's very helpful to insert custom variables like ASPNETCORE_ENVIRONMENT into the environment properties of the instance. Thanks a lot. Jul 23, 2018 at 7:31
  • 3
    Mid July 2019...this is still needed. In program.cs, Call SetEbConfig(); in Main(), before CreateWebHostBuilder(args).Build().Run();
    – sean717
    Jul 17, 2019 at 21:05
  • 1
    the accepted solution did not work for me, but this worked great.
    – gotmike
    Oct 10, 2019 at 0:55
22

Had the same problem, and just received a reply from AWS support about this issue. Apparently environment variables are not properly injected into ASP.NET Core applications in elastic beanstalk.

As far as I know, they're working to fix the problem.

The workaround is to parse C:\Program Files\Amazon\ElasticBeanstalk\config\containerconfiguration into the configuration builder. This file is part of your elastic beanstalk environment and should be accessible upon deploying your project.

First add the file:

var builder = new ConfigurationBuilder()
    .SetBasePath("C:\\Program Files\\Amazon\\ElasticBeanstalk\\config")
    .AddJsonFile("containerconfiguration", optional: true, reloadOnChange: true);

Then access the values:

var env = Configuration.GetSection("iis:env").GetChildren();

foreach (var envKeyValue in env)
{
    var splitKeyValue = envKeyValue.Value.Split('=');
    var envKey = splitKeyValue[0];
    var envValue = splitKeyValue[1];
    if (envKey == "HelloWorld")
    {
        // use envValue here
    }
}

Courtesy of G.P. from Amazon Web Services

7
  • As of today this bug is still present. Using this workaround you can implement your own ConfigurationProvider and work around the issue.
    – Gabriel
    Jan 25, 2017 at 4:25
  • One thing to note is that the utility methods in Amazon.Extensions.NETCore.Setup ignore Configuration and try to read from Environment directly. You'll have to manually add the AWSCredentials, RegionEndpoint, and any services you're consuming as singletons. Mar 6, 2017 at 16:37
  • 29
    The fact that this is necessary is ludicrous, and it should embarrass AWS (whom I normally like and respect) that it's still unfixed, 12 months after ASP.NET Core 1.0's release, despite Amazon claiming to support ASP.NET Core on Elastic Beanstalk and offering tutorials on how to deploy it there. This is basic functionality, probably fixable in a couple of days by an intern, and it shows pretty appalling quality of service for it to just be left broken for a year. Still, at least this answer works; +1.
    – Mark Amery
    Jun 6, 2017 at 11:13
  • @AaronHudon I posted a different (and easier) solution below: stackoverflow.com/a/50354329/190750. However, it looks like the EB environment properties workflow is still unsupported for .NET Core. May 15, 2018 at 15:51
  • 3
    Here we are in late august in 2019 and this issue still persist. This is a permanent "fix" I guess, AWS does not care to to fix the issue.
    – gustav
    Aug 28, 2019 at 9:56
7

I implemented the other answer to create a convenient workaround to load the environment properties from Elastic Beanstalk directly into your ASP.NET Core app configuration.

For ASP.NET Core 2.0 - edit your Program.cs

Note that this WebHost build was taken from the source code of WebHostBuilder.CreateDefaultBuilder()

https://github.com/aspnet/MetaPackages/blob/dev/src/Microsoft.AspNetCore/WebHost.cs

using System.Collections.Generic;
using System.IO;
using System.Linq;
using System.Reflection;
using Microsoft.AspNetCore.Hosting;
using Microsoft.AspNetCore.Server.Kestrel.Core;
using Microsoft.AspNetCore.Server.Kestrel.Core.Internal;
using Microsoft.Extensions.Configuration;
using Microsoft.Extensions.DependencyInjection;
using Microsoft.Extensions.Logging;
using Microsoft.Extensions.Options;

namespace NightSpotAdm
{
    public class Program
    {
        public static void Main(string[] args)
        {
            BuildWebHost(args).Run();
        }

        public static IWebHost BuildWebHost(string[] args)
        {
            // TEMP CONFIG BUILDER TO GET THE VALUES IN THE ELASTIC BEANSTALK CONFIG
            IConfigurationBuilder tempConfigBuilder = new ConfigurationBuilder();

            tempConfigBuilder.AddJsonFile(
                @"C:\Program Files\Amazon\ElasticBeanstalk\config\containerconfiguration",
                optional: true,
                reloadOnChange: true
            );

            IConfigurationRoot tempConfig = tempConfigBuilder.Build();

            Dictionary<string, string> ebConfig = ElasticBeanstalk.GetConfig(tempConfig);

            // START WEB HOST BUILDER
            IWebHostBuilder builder = new WebHostBuilder()
                .UseKestrel()
                .UseContentRoot(Directory.GetCurrentDirectory());

            // CHECK IF EBCONFIG HAS ENVIRONMENT KEY IN IT
            // IF SO THEN CHANGE THE BUILDERS ENVIRONMENT
            const string envKey = "ASPNETCORE_ENVIRONMENT";

            if (ebConfig.ContainsKey(envKey))
            {
                string ebEnvironment = ebConfig[envKey];
                builder.UseEnvironment(ebEnvironment);
            }

            // CONTINUE WITH WEB HOST BUILDER AS NORMAL
            builder.ConfigureAppConfiguration((hostingContext, config) =>
                {
                    IHostingEnvironment env = hostingContext.HostingEnvironment;

                    // ADD THE ELASTIC BEANSTALK CONFIG DICTIONARY
                    config.AddJsonFile(
                            "appsettings.json",
                            optional: true,
                            reloadOnChange: true
                        )
                        .AddJsonFile(
                            $"appsettings.{env.EnvironmentName}.json",
                            optional: true,
                            reloadOnChange: true
                        )
                        .AddInMemoryCollection(ebConfig);

                    if (env.IsDevelopment())
                    {
                        Assembly appAssembly = Assembly.Load(new AssemblyName(env.ApplicationName));
                        if (appAssembly != null)
                        {
                            config.AddUserSecrets(appAssembly, optional: true);
                        }
                    }

                    config.AddEnvironmentVariables();

                    if (args != null)
                    {
                        config.AddCommandLine(args);
                    }
                })
                .ConfigureLogging((hostingContext, logging) =>
                {
                    logging.AddConfiguration(hostingContext.Configuration.GetSection("Logging"));
                    logging.AddConsole();
                    logging.AddDebug();
                })
                .UseIISIntegration()
                .UseDefaultServiceProvider(
                    (context, options) => { options.ValidateScopes = context.HostingEnvironment.IsDevelopment(); })
                .ConfigureServices(
                    services =>
                    {
                        services.AddTransient<IConfigureOptions<KestrelServerOptions>, KestrelServerOptionsSetup>();
                    });

            return builder.UseStartup<Startup>().Build();
        }
    }

    public static class ElasticBeanstalk
    {
        public static Dictionary<string, string> GetConfig(IConfiguration configuration)
        {
            return
                configuration.GetSection("iis:env")
                    .GetChildren()
                    .Select(pair => pair.Value.Split(new[] { '=' }, 2))
                    .ToDictionary(keypair => keypair[0], keypair => keypair[1]);
        }
    }
}

For ASP.NET Core 1.0

    public Startup(IHostingEnvironment env)
    {
        var builder = new ConfigurationBuilder()
            .SetBasePath(env.ContentRootPath)
            .AddJsonFile("appsettings.json", optional: false, reloadOnChange: true)
            .AddJsonFile($"appsettings.{env.EnvironmentName}.json", optional: true)
            .AddJsonFile(@"C:\Program Files\Amazon\ElasticBeanstalk\config\containerconfiguration", optional: true, reloadOnChange: true)
            .AddEnvironmentVariables();

        var config = builder.Build();

        builder.AddInMemoryCollection(GetEbConfig(config));

        Configuration = builder.Build();
    }

    private static Dictionary<string, string> GetEbConfig(IConfiguration configuration)
    {
        Dictionary<string, string> dict = new Dictionary<string, string>();

        foreach (IConfigurationSection pair in configuration.GetSection("iis:env").GetChildren())
        {
            string[] keypair = pair.Value.Split(new [] {'='}, 2);
            dict.Add(keypair[0], keypair[1]);
        }

        return dict;
    }
5

Instead of having to parse the containerconfiguration you can leverage the ebextensions options to set the variable as part of your deploy process:

commands:
  set_environment: 
    command: setx ASPNETCORE_ENVIRONMENT "Development" /M

This will set a global environment variable as part of your application deployment. This variable use-case is officially supported and documented by Microsoft.

After deploying your app you can verify the setting is set correctly in the EC2 instance:

environment variable

1
  • 1
    but if you want to use the same deployment package on different endpoints/stages this is not really an option or am I missing something?
    – sk2andy
    Nov 8, 2019 at 12:48
4

AWS addressed this issue in the Elastic Beanstalk Windows Server platform update on June 29, 2020:

Previously, Elastic Beanstalk didn't support passing environment variables to .NET Core applications and multiple-application IIS deployments that use a deployment manifest [1]. The Elastic Beanstalk Windows Server platform update on June 29, 2020 [2] now fixes this gap. For details, see Configuring your .NET environment in the Elastic Beanstalk console [3].

[1] https://docs.aws.amazon.com/elasticbeanstalk/latest/dg/dotnet-manifest.html

[2] https://docs.aws.amazon.com/elasticbeanstalk/latest/relnotes/release-2020-06-29-windows.html

[3] https://docs.aws.amazon.com/elasticbeanstalk/latest/dg/create_deploy_NET.container.console.html#dotnet-console

2

Above solution doesnt helped me to load config file based on enviroment settings. So here is my solution AWS ElasticBeansTalk "hack"

    public Startup(IHostingEnvironment env)
    {
        var builder = new ConfigurationBuilder()
            .SetBasePath(env.ContentRootPath)
            .AddJsonFile("appsettings.json", optional: false, reloadOnChange: true)
            .AddJsonFile($"appsettings.{GetEnvVariableAWSBeansTalkHack(env)}.json", optional: true)
            .AddEnvironmentVariables();

        Configuration = builder.Build();
    }

    private static string GetEnvVariableAWSBeansTalkHack(IHostingEnvironment env)
    {
        var config = new ConfigurationBuilder()
           .AddJsonFile(@"C:\Program Files\Amazon\ElasticBeanstalk\config\containerconfiguration", optional: true, reloadOnChange: true).Build();

        Dictionary<string, string> dict = new Dictionary<string, string>();
        foreach (IConfigurationSection pair in config.GetSection("iis:env").GetChildren())
        {
            string[] keypair = pair.Value.Split(new[] { '=' }, 2);
            dict.Add(keypair[0], keypair[1]);
        }

        return dict.ContainsKey("ASPNETCORE_ENVIRONMENT") 
                ? dict["ASPNETCORE_ENVIRONMENT"] 
                : env.EnvironmentName;
    }
2

You can create an implementation of Microsoft.Extensions.Configuration.

Also available at https://gist.github.com/skarllot/11e94ed8901a9ddabdf05c0e5c08dbc5.

using Microsoft.Extensions.Configuration;
using Newtonsoft.Json.Linq;
using System.IO;
using System.Linq;

namespace Microsoft.Extensions.Configuration.AWS
{
    public class AmazonEBConfigurationProvider : ConfigurationProvider
    {
        private const string ConfigurationFilename = @"C:\Program Files\Amazon\ElasticBeanstalk\config\containerconfiguration";

        public override void Load()
        {
            if (!File.Exists(ConfigurationFilename))
                return;

            string configJson;
            try
            {
                configJson = File.ReadAllText(ConfigurationFilename);
            }
            catch
            {
                return;
            }

            var config = JObject.Parse(configJson);
            var env = (JArray)config["iis"]["env"];

            if (env.Count == 0)
                return;

            foreach (var item in env.Select(i => (string)i))
            {
                int eqIndex = item.IndexOf('=');
                Data[item.Substring(0, eqIndex)] = item.Substring(eqIndex + 1);
            }
        }
    }

    public class AmazonEBConfigurationSource : IConfigurationSource
    {
        public IConfigurationProvider Build(IConfigurationBuilder builder)
        {
            return new AmazonEBConfigurationProvider();
        }
    }

    public static class AmazonEBExtensions
    {
        public static IConfigurationBuilder AddAmazonElasticBeanstalk(this IConfigurationBuilder configurationBuilder)
        {
            configurationBuilder.Add(new AmazonEBConfigurationSource());
            return configurationBuilder;
        }
    }
}

Then use with your ConfigurationBuilder:

var builder = new ConfigurationBuilder()
    .SetBasePath(env.ContentRootPath)
    .AddJsonFile("appsettings.json", true, true)
    .AddJsonFile($"appsettings.{env.EnvironmentName}.json", true)
    .AddAmazonElasticBeanstalk()    // <-- Merge with other sources
    .AddEnvironmentVariables();
0
1

.NET Core 2 + posrgresql RDS

Further to @sebastian's great answer above, I found that the settings were in a different part of the file, viz. plugins:rds:env.

Also there was no need to split on =, so the parsing code I have is:

private static void SetEbConfig()
        {
            var tempConfigBuilder = new ConfigurationBuilder();

            tempConfigBuilder.AddJsonFile(
                @"C:\Program Files\Amazon\ElasticBeanstalk\config\containerconfiguration",
                optional: true,
                reloadOnChange: true
            );

            var configuration = tempConfigBuilder.Build();

            var ebEnv = configuration.GetSection("plugins:rds:env")
                                        .GetChildren()
                                        .ToDictionary(child => child.Key, child => child.Value);

            foreach (var keyVal in ebEnv)
            {
                Environment.SetEnvironmentVariable(keyVal.Key, keyVal.Value);
            }
        }

The relevant (and redacted ;-)) JSON is as follows:

{
    "plugins": {
        "rds": {
            "Description": "RDS Environment variables",
            "env": {
                "RDS_PORT": "....",
                "RDS_HOSTNAME": "....",
                "RDS_USERNAME": "....",
                "RDS_DB_NAME": "....",
                "RDS_PASSWORD": "...."
            }
        }
    }
}

(This reply is separate since I don't have rep to comment...)

1
  • this seems like a pretty clean way to do it
    – razblack
    Feb 9, 2019 at 3:03
0

This can definitely be done in an .ebextensions folder. Simply create a new file in your .ebextensions folder (I used a name of "options.config"), mark it as "copy if newer" or "copy always" and make sure you use the option_settings header with a aws:elasticbeanstalk:application:environment namespace:

option_settings:
  aws:elasticbeanstalk:application:environment:
    MyEnvVar: SomeValue

EDIT: I forgot to include a link to the docs! https://docs.aws.amazon.com/elasticbeanstalk/latest/dg/environments-cfg-softwaresettings.html

0

Update for ASP.net Core 3

Set ASPNETCORE_ENVIRONMENT environment variable in Elastic Beanstalk to Staging, Production, Development...

In Core project create appsettings.Staging.json and this configuration will be used when this the project is deployed.

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