4

Consider a hypothetical scenario where two classes can be default-constructed or constructed from each other but either way is considered to be expensive (intentionally contrived example follows):

struct PrivateKey;

struct PublicKey {
  PublicKey(); // generate a random public key (1 minute)
  PublicKey(const PrivateKey& b); // find a public key corresponding to a private key (1 year)
  ...members...
};

struct PrivateKey {
  PrivateKey(); // generate a random private key (1 minute)
  PrivateKey(const PublicKey& a); // find a private key corresponding to a public key (1 year)
  ...members...
};

(This could of course be condensed to one class but the validity of the question is unaffected. Let's say for the sake of coherence there's no symmetry between one and the other.)

Now there's a structure which holds instances of both and needs this cross-initialization. However, we may need both directions, so initializer lists can't really cut it (they aren't run in the order listed but in the order the members are defined, and no order can be fixed here):

struct X {
  PublicKey a;
  PrivateKey b;
  X(int): a(), b(a) { }
  X(float): b(), a(b) { } // UB: a(b) happens before b is initialized
};

Of course I could try:

struct X {
  PublicKey a;
  PrivateKey b;
  X(int): a(), b(a) { }
  X(float): a(), b() { a = PublicKey(b); }
};

but this has multiple issues, of which running the expensive default-construction of PublicKey in the second constructor of X just to throw the result right away is just the first. There may be side effects to PublicKey::PublicKey(). Both could still be mitigated by creating a cheap private constructor exposed only to a friend X which would put the class in some dummy state, but toss in some reference or constant members and the class may not be move-assignable or swappable, forbidding any variation on the X::X(float)'s body. Is there a better pattern to follow?

  • 3
    Use PublicKey *a and PrivateKey *b, and construct them inside the constructor body { ... }. – AJNeufeld Oct 19 '16 at 17:39
  • 3
    @AJNeufeld The answer box is down below. – NathanOliver Oct 19 '16 at 17:39
  • Crystal clear. OMG, what was I even thinking? Care to post an answer? – The Vee Oct 19 '16 at 17:43
  • BTW, losing 1 min over 1 year is not really an issue. – Jarod42 Oct 19 '16 at 18:09
  • @Jarod42 Realized that after posting. But I didn't want to have to think of another problem that has similar properties. – The Vee Oct 19 '16 at 18:11
7

The construction order issue can be avoided by using pointers to the contained classes, instead of embedding the contained classes directly, and constructing the contained objects yourself inside the body of the constructor.

struct X {
  std::unique_ptr<PublicKey> a;
  std::unique_ptr<PrivateKey> b;
  X(int) {
    a = std::make_unique<PublicKey>();
    b = std::make_unique<PrivateKey>(*a);
  }
  X(float) {
    b = std::make_unique<PrivateKey>();
    a = std::make_unique<PublicKey>(*b);
  }
};
  • 1
    Maybe, even if the code is self-explanatory, the code should have an explanation, because it could help those in the future. – Arnav Borborah Oct 19 '16 at 17:45
  • 1
    You could mention that in practice, std::unique_ptr should be used instead of raw pointers. – Angew Oct 19 '16 at 17:45
  • Now that you are using unique_ptr you should be using make_unique in the constructor bodies. – NathanOliver Oct 19 '16 at 17:56
  • @NathanOliver Due to multiple suggested improvements, I've changed this to a community wiki. Additional improvements may be made directly to the answer. – AJNeufeld Oct 19 '16 at 18:00
  • Made some myself to save others' work. Thanks a lot! – The Vee Oct 19 '16 at 18:01
3

If the classes are at least move-constructible, you should be able to do this:

struct KeyPair
{
  PublicKey a;
  PrivateKey b;
  KeyPair(std::pair<PublicKey, PrivateKey> &&data) :
    a(std::move(data.first)),
    b(std::move(data.second))
  {}
};

std::pair<PublicKey, PrivateKey> computePublicFirst()
{
  PublicKey a;
  PrivateKey b(a);
  return {std::move(a), std::move(b)};
}

std::pair<PublicKey, PrivateKey> computePrivateFirst()
{
  PrivateKey b;
  PublicKey a(b);
  return {std::move(a), std::move(b)};
}

struct X
{
  KeyPair keys;
  X(int) : keys(computePublicFirst()) {}
  X(float) : keys(computePrivateFirst()) {}
};

No move assignments happen, only move construction.

  • I wish I could accept both solutions. I chose the other answer for its elegance and semantic clarity but yours is perfect if one wants to eliminate the extra pointer resolution at each method call of A or B, as I often consider important. – The Vee Oct 27 '16 at 20:18

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