I'm stuck on XORing a 32-bit integer with it itself. I'm supposed to XOR the 4 8-bit portions of the integers. I understand how it works, but without storing the integer anywhere, I don't get how to do this.

I've thought it over and I'm thinking of using binary left shift and right shift operators to separate the 32 bit integer into 4 parts to XOR them. For example, if I were to use an 8-bit integer, I would do something like this:

int a = <some integer here>
(a << 4) ^ (a >> 4)

So far, it isn't working the way I thought it would work.

Here's a part of my code:

else if (choice == 2) {
    int bits = 8;

    printf("Enter an integer for checksum calculation: ");
    scanf("%d", &in);
    printf("Integer: %d, ", in);

    int x = in, i;
    int mask = 1 << sizeof(int) * bits - 1;

    printf("Bit representation: ");

    for (i = 1; i <= sizeof(int) * bits; i++) {   
        if (x & mask)
            putchar('1');
        else
            putchar('0');

        x <<= 1;
        if (! (i % 8)) {
            putchar(' ');
        }
    }
    printf("\n");

}

Here's an example of an output:

    What type of display do you want? 
    Enter 1 for character parity, 2 for integer checksum: 2 
    Enter an integer for checksum calculation:  1024 
    Integer: 1024, Bit representation: 00000000 00000000 00000100 00000000
    Checksum of the number is: 4, Bit representation: 00000100     
  • 2
    General advice: don't shift signed integers over full width. If can be implementation defined or even invoke undefined behaviour (see the standard for details). And if you need 32 bit integers, use standard fixed-width types. – too honest for this site Oct 20 '16 at 2:00
  • 1
    I'm a little confused about what you're asking, because I don't see any XOR in your program, apart from the irrelevant snippet you showed above the program. At a guess, maybe you're trying to do something like a = (a << 4) ^ (a >> 4) which is undefined behaviour because of sequence points. – paddy Oct 20 '16 at 2:39
  • for (i = 1; i <= sizeof(int) * bits; i++) { if (x & mask) putchar('1'); else putchar('0'); looks like printing the binary value - which has little to do with "I'm supposed to XOR the 4 8-bit portions of the integers." Please clarify your goal or trouble, – chux Oct 20 '16 at 3:05
  • @paddy I do not the sequence point issue in a = (a << 4) ^ (a >> 4)? Please detail. – chux Oct 20 '16 at 3:06
  • Hmmm, I think I might have actually become confused, and am completely wrong. – paddy Oct 20 '16 at 4:02
up vote 0 down vote accepted

To accumulate the XOR of 8-bit values, you simply shift and XOR each part of the value. Conceptually it's this:

uint32_t checksum = ( (a >> 24) ^ (a >> 16) ^ (a >> 8) ^ a ) & 0xff;

However, since XOR can be done in any order, you can do the same with fewer operations:

uint32_t checksum = (a >> 16) ^ a;
checksum = ((checksum >> 8) ^ checksum) & 0xff;

If you're doing this over many values, you can extend this idea by only condensing the value at the very end. This is quite similar to how parallel commutative operations are done in larger registers with technologies like SIMD (and indeed, compilers with SIMD support should be able to optimize the following code to make it much faster):

uint32_t simple_checksum( uint32_t *v, size_t count )
{
    uint32_t checksum = 0;
    uint32_t *end = v + count;
    for( ; v != end; v++ )
    {
        checksum ^= *v;            /* accumulate XOR of each 32-bit value     */
    }
    checksum ^= (checksum >> 16);  /* XOR high and low words into low word    */
    checksum ^= (checksum >> 8 );  /* XOR each byte of low word into low byte */
    return checksum & 0xff;        /* everything from bits 8-31 is rubbish    */
}
  • Oh great, this was something I was trying to do, thank you for the help! – Jasmine Oct 20 '16 at 4:25
  • 1
    a = ((a >> 16) ^ a); checksum = ((a >> 8) ^ a) & 0xFF; would require less shifts – phuclv Oct 20 '16 at 4:40
  • That's a good point @LưuVĩnhPhúc -- I've rephrased the answer accordingly. – paddy Oct 20 '16 at 22:43

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