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While writing a Linux kernel module, I faced a problem with a kthread that I am unable to wake up while waiting for a semaphore to unlock. This causes the thread to be unstoppable and rmmod to freeze when trying to unload the module.

Please note: This module runs on a 3.10 kernel and I have no way to update this to a newer version (customer demands running on stock CentOS 7, which features a 3.10 kernel).

Below are the interesting parts from the module source code. It represents a simple producer consumer problem, the list is not limited in size (thus no producer semaphore is required) and guarded by a mutex. The function to take something from the list is guarded by a semaphore that is upped by the producer and downed by the consumer. The producer function is called from an external event (in fact a char device) not shown in this code snippets to keep is as small as possible. The process works perfectly, except for the module unloading.

The parts that cause the freezing are marked with comments in the code snippets. The only way I know of to stop a kthread is to call kthread_stop on it, which fails in this case since it apparently cannot wake up the sleeping thread. Because it waits for the thread to exit, the call will never return and the module will not unload.

How can I wake up and stop the kthread waiting for the semaphore to unload the module successfully?

List implementation:

#include <linux/mutex.h>
#include <linux/list.h>
#include <linux/semaphore.h>

static LIST_HEAD(list);
DEFINE_MUTEX(list_lock);
DEFINE_SEMAPHORE(sem_list_consumer);

void add_to_list(struct *some_struct) {
    int rv = mutex_lock_interruptible(&list_lock);
    if(rv != 0) {
        return;
    }

    list_add(&some_struct->list, &list);
    mutex_unlock(&list_lock);
    up(&sem_list_consumer);
}

struct some_struct * take_from_list() {
    int rv;
    some_struct *entry;

    /* this is where the kthread will freeze when module is unloaded */
    rv = down_interruptible(&sem_list_consumer);
    if(rv != 0) {
        return NULL;
    }

    rv = mutex_lock_interruptible(&list_lock);
    if(rv != 0) {
        up(&sem_list_consumer);
        return NULL;
    }

    if (list_empty(&list)) {
        mutex_unlock(&list_lock);
        return NULL;
    } else {
        entry = list_last_entry(&list, struct some_struct, list);
        if (entry) {
            list_del(&entry->list);
        }
    }

    mutex_unlock(&list_lock);
    return entry;
}

Consumer kthread implementation:

#include <linux/kthread.h>
#include <linux/sched.h>

int consumer_kthread(void *data) {
    struct some_struct *entry;

    set_current_state(TASK_INTERRUPTIBLE);
    while (!kthread_should_stop()) {
        /* Here the function including the semaphore is called */
        entry = take_from_list();
        if(entry != NULL) {
            /* Do something with 'entry' here */
        } else {
            /* Some handling of returned NULL pointers */
        }

        set_current_state(TASK_INTERRUPTIBLE);
    }
    set_current_state(TASK_RUNNING);

    return 0;
}

Module implementation:

#include <linux/init.h>
#include <linux/kthread.h>
#include <linux/module.h>
#include <linux/sched.h>

static struct task_struct *consumer_task;

static int __init initModule(void) {
    consumer_task = kthread_run(consumer_kthread, NULL, "list-consumer");

    return 0;
}

static void __exit exitModule(void) {
    /* this call will cause rmmod to freeze forever */
    kthread_stop(consumer_task);
}

module_init(initModule);
module_exit(exitModule);

MODULE_LICENSE("GPL v2");
MODULE_DESCRIPTION("My Module");
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  • 1
    There are three places in your take_from_list function that return NULL. In one of those three places it returns while still holding the sem_list_consumer semaphore. I suspect this inconsistency has something to do with your problem. Otherwise, how could the caller tell whether it needs to release the semaphore or not?
    – Ian Abbott
    Oct 21, 2016 at 14:38
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    That may cause problems later on, but my problem exists even if you just load and unload the module, without ever calling the producer code. Also the problem would only occur if something interrupts/wakes the kthread, but this is exactly what I fail to achieve.
    – marandus
    Oct 24, 2016 at 9:49
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    You've already established that the producer code is not the problem, so the error lies in your consumer code. It's hard to tell due to the missing code, but I suspect all you need to do is call up(&sem_list_consumer); between the lines mutex_unlock(&list_lock); and return NULL; in your take_from_list function. That's unless you expect the sem_list_consumer semaphore to be held even when take_from_list returns NULL, in which case you'd need to somehow deal with take_from_list sometimes returning NULL without holding the semaphore.
    – Ian Abbott
    Oct 24, 2016 at 10:17

2 Answers 2

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The missing code means that this answer can only use educated guesses.

Here are my assumptions about your missing code:

  1. If take_from_list returns a valid entry, consumer_kthread does something with the entry and calls up(&sem_list_consumer) to match the call to down_interruptible(&sem_list_consumer) in take_from_list.

  2. If take_from_list returns NULL, consumer_kthread does some handling of the NULL pointer, and assumes the sem_list_consumer semaphore is in its original state.

Given those assumptions, there is a bug in take_from_list because it sometimes returns NULL without calling up(&sem_list_consumer) first. That means that any subsequent calls to take_from_list will block on the call to down_interruptible(&sem_list_consumer) until they are interrupted by a signal. To fix that bug, change take_from_list to always leave the semaphore in the state it left it whenever it returns NULL:

struct some_struct * take_from_list() {
    int rv;
    some_struct *entry;

    rv = down_interruptible(&sem_list_consumer);
    if(rv != 0) {
        return NULL;
    }

    rv = mutex_lock_interruptible(&list_lock);
    if(rv != 0) {
        up(&sem_list_consumer);
        return NULL;
    }

    if (list_empty(&list)) {
        mutex_unlock(&list_lock);
        up(&sem_list_consumer);  /* <-- this line was missing */
        return NULL;
    } else {
        entry = list_last_entry(&list, struct some_struct, list);
        if (entry) {
            list_del(&entry->list);
        }
    }

    mutex_unlock(&list_lock);
    return entry;
}

AMENDED

If there is some place in the missing code of consumer_kthread that adds itself to a wait queue and goes to sleep, a call to kthread_should_stop() should be included in the wake-up conditions. The wake-up condition should be satisfied by the other conditions OR (||) kthread_should_stop().

A call to kthread_stop(consumer_task) from your exitModule function will wake up the consumer thread. If it is waiting on an event, the first thing it will do is check the wake up conditions and go back to sleep if they are not satisfied. By including kthread_should_stop() as one of the possible wake-up conditions, you ensure that the consumer thread does not immediately go back to sleep.

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    You are right, the missing line could cause problems. But it is not the root cause here. The whole design is built on the idea that the kthread sleeps while the list is empty and gets woken up by the producer if there is something in the list (this is why I explicitly mentioned the producer-consumer-problem). So if the list is empty, the thread will never ever reach that point you added the missing line. Could you please give an example how to send a signal to a kthread inside the kernel? I guess that would fix my problem, since I miss the interrupting signal and have no idea how to send it.
    – marandus
    Oct 25, 2016 at 7:51
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    Your exitModule function should be able to wake up the consumer thread in the same way that the producer thread wakes it up. There should be no need for exitModule to send a signal to the consumer thread, but it should set a flag before waking up the consumer thread, and the consumer thread should take appropriate action when that flag is set.
    – Ian Abbott
    Oct 25, 2016 at 9:58
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    Instead of using a separate flag, you can just include a call to kthread_should_stop() as part of your wait event wake-up condition. That's probably the easiest way to do it, actually. I'll amend my answer accordingly. Forget signals - that's a blunt hammer approach to the problem.
    – Ian Abbott
    Oct 25, 2016 at 10:14
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You need to send the waiting process a signal. The process will then change from TASK_INTERRUPTABLE to to TASK_RUNNING, it will then be scheduled and run with down_interruptable returning EINTR.

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    Thank you for your answer. Could you give a short example how to send a signal to kthread? I tried digging around in the kernel source to find out how it works, but I am unsure how to do it exactly and what, for example the siginfo struct, is required for and what I should write into it.
    – marandus
    Oct 20, 2016 at 11:09

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