40

I would like to create an external redirect, but to make all routes consistent I think it would be nice to do everything(including external redirects) under Router States configuration.

so:

const appRoutes: Routes = [
  {path: '', component: HomeComponent},
  {path: 'first', component: FirstComponent},
  {path: 'second', component: SecondComponent},
  {path: 'external-link', /*would like to have redirect here*/}      
];

UPD: and I don't want to use empty component for this case like @koningdavid suggested. This solution looks really weird for me. It should be something really easy to implement for such case, without virtual components.

  • 2
    looks like something you should be doing on the server instead, a sort of redirect rule – Ayyash May 10 '17 at 7:57
52
+200

You can achieve what you want with a trick using the resolve option of a route. Resolve is some data value that Angular2 will obtain for the route to be initialized. More details you can find here in the official documentation.

I have tried this approach and it does work. Example:

Add this to the provider section (plus import the required classes from Routing)

@NgModule({
    providers: [
        {
            provide: 'externalUrlRedirectResolver',
            useValue: (route: ActivatedRouteSnapshot, state: RouterStateSnapshot) =>
            {
                window.location.href = (route.data as any).externalUrl;
            }
        }
    ]
})

Then you can define your route like this:

{
        path: 'test',
        component: AnyRandomComponent,
        resolve: {
            url: 'externalUrlRedirectResolver'
        },
        data: {
            externalUrl: 'http://www.google.com'
        }
    }

This will redirect to the external URL. It's a bit of a hackish way really. I tried to achieve the result without using the component at all, but you have to use either redirectTo or component or children or loadChildren. redirectTo won't trigger the resolve and I am not sure about children, though you can experiment.

You can implement it in a nice class rather than direct function in provider. More info in the documentation (see reference above).

P.S. I would really rather use a redirect component myself I think. Just use the trick with the data and getting the state from the router with externalUrl to get this as a parameter.

  • Maybe it is a little hacky, but this solution works with AOT compilation while Sam's did not (I tried it) – Joshua Kemmerer Feb 27 '18 at 15:01
  • Is there any need for state in the redirect function? Seems to be working fine without it. – John Montgomery Aug 9 '18 at 23:41
  • Also consider using a CanActivate Router guard. (stackoverflow.com/a/51059505/111243) This is useful so you can open in a new window and prevent angular navigation, tap the link multiple times, not show the AnyRandomComponent. – SimplGy Sep 14 '18 at 18:41
20

You can create a RedirectGuard:

import {Injectable} from '@angular/core';
import {CanActivate, ActivatedRouteSnapshot, Router, RouterStateSnapshot} from '@angular/router';

@Injectable()
export class RedirectGuard implements CanActivate {

  constructor(private router: Router) {}

  canActivate(route: ActivatedRouteSnapshot, state: RouterStateSnapshot): boolean {

      window.location.href = route.data['externalUrl'];
      return true;

  }
}

Import it in app.module:

providers: [RedirectGuard],

And define your route:

{
     path: 'youtube',
     canActivate: [RedirectGuard],
     component: RedirectGuard,
     data: {
       externalUrl: 'https://www.youtube.com/'
     }
 }
  • This is actually much better than the accepted answer. Using a Guard/CanActivate means you can cancel angular navigation. If you're opening the external link in a new window this is important, because you enable tapping the link multiple times and don't have to show an empty/noop comopnent. full example: gist.github.com/SimplGy/64f9e64afd4d7af2e6e9befced7878c1 – SimplGy Sep 14 '18 at 18:39
  • May be return false is more logical return statement? – V. Kalyuzhnyu Sep 22 '18 at 14:28
  • This should be the accepted answer. – B2K Nov 6 '18 at 19:21
  • What if the externalUrl relies on config variables? i.e yoursitedev.com vs yoursitestage.com? Can you reliably import dynamic config variables for use in app.module? – Smooth Feb 12 at 19:10
16

As far as I know NG2 router doesn't support external redirecting. You could create a redirect component as a workaround.

import { Component, OnInit } from '@angular/core';

@Component({
  selector: 'redirect',
  template: 'redirecting...'
})
export class RedirectComponent implements OnInit {
  constructor() { }

  ngOnInit() {
    window.location.href = 'http://www.redirecturl.com'
  }
}

And use that in your routing

{ path: 'login', component: RedirectComponent, pathmath: 'full'},
  • 3
    Thank you, but I need without using component. The main idea created without component. – Yaroslav Polubedov Oct 20 '16 at 10:06
  • 2
    The Router can't redirect externally. It doesn't make sense, as an external resource can't actually be a state of the app. – Fiddles Nov 3 '16 at 2:33
  • why not to have it consistent? You can manage all the redirects via Router config. And you should not care about it on component level. For example: we had login like a state of our app and after we migrate it to another application – Stepan Suvorov Nov 4 '16 at 10:02
  • @stepan-suvorov Angular 2 offers the client-side Component Router for single page apps. Always redirecting to a component is consistent. When you redirect to a component Angular router adds the URL fragment to the original URL, and redirecting to external URL would not allow to do so. – Yakov Fain Nov 4 '16 at 12:20
8

Hmm...

I think you can simply request the URL instead of calling ng2 Router...


For example...

<a href="http://example.com">External</a>

instead of

<a routerLink="/someRoute" routerLinkActive="active">External</a>

OR

window.location.href = 'http://www.example.com'

instead of

this.router.navigate( [ '/someRoute', 'someParam' ] );

Right...?

  • please read this part of the question "but to make all routes consistent". We would like to keep all URL/state changes under router configuration – Stepan Suvorov Nov 3 '16 at 8:54
4

The Router can't redirect externally. An external resource can't be a state of the app.

If it's only for clarity, keeping all the routes visible in the one spot, you could define another constant array with all the external paths in the same file as the routes.

2

I assume you don't wanna create a component for every single url, which is why you are looking to do it without a component...

So you can try creating a function that generates the component object for you...

For example...

function generateLinkingComponent( url ) {
  // Generate your component using koningdavid's code
  // replace 'http://www.redirecturl.com' with url param
  // and return it...
}

And add it like this in your router config...

const appRoutes: Routes = [
  {path: '', component: HomeComponent},
  {path: 'first', component: FirstComponent},
  {path: 'second', component: SecondComponent},
  {path: 'external-link', component: generateLinkingComponent( 'http://example.com' )},
  {path: 'client-login', component: generateLinkingComponent( 'http://client-login.example.com' )},
  {path: 'admin-login', component: generateLinkingComponent( 'http://admin.example.com' )},
];

This will be easy with JS... but not sure how one can return a class in a function in typeScript...

Hope that helps...

1

Wrapping up Ilya's answer:

Add this module.

import { Component, Injectable, NgModule } from '@angular/core';
import { ActivatedRouteSnapshot, Resolve } from '@angular/router';

@Component({
  template: ''
})
class ExternalLinkComponent {
  constructor() {
  }
}

@Injectable()
class ExternalLinkResolver implements Resolve<any> {
  resolve(route: ActivatedRouteSnapshot): any {
    window.location.href = route.data.targetUri;
    return true;
  }
}

export class ExternalRoute {
  data: {
    targetUri: string;
  };
  path: string;
  pathMatch = 'full';
  resolve = { link: ExternalLinkResolver };
  component = ExternalLinkComponent;

  constructor(path: string, targetUri: string) {
    this.path = path;
    this.data = { targetUri: targetUri };
  }

}

@NgModule({
  providers: [ ExternalLinkResolver ],
  declarations: [ExternalLinkComponent]
})
export class ExternalRoutesModule { }

Then import ExternalRoutesModule and add instances of ExternalRoute.

const childRoutes: Routes = [
  new ExternalRoute('', '/settings/account'),
  { path: 'staff-profiles', component:  StaffProfilesComponent},
  { path: 'staff-assignments', component:  StaffAssignmentsComponent}
];

const routes: Routes = [
  { path: '', component: BaseComponent, children: childRoutes }
];

@NgModule({
  imports: [ ExternalRoutesModule, RouterModule.forChild(routes) ],
  exports: [ RouterModule ]
})
export class SettingsRoutingModule { }

Note I'm mounting the submodule routes via loadChildren in this example.

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