For some reason the cells in my second row in my table are changing the width of the cells in the row above. I have no idea why this is the cause. I don't want the width of the first cell in the first row to be changed. I have reproduced the problem in jsfiddle to make it clear what I mean.

FiddleJS link:

https://jsfiddle.net/bpyrgsvc/1/

HTML:

<div class="table">
  <div class="row">
    <div class="cell">test</div>
    <div class="cell">test</div>
    <div class="cell">test</div>
    <div class="cell">test</div>
    <div class="cell">test</div>
  </div>
  <div class="row">
    <div class="cell">this changes the width of the cell above</div>
  </div>
</div>

CSS:

.table {
  display:table;
}

.row {
  display: table-row;
}

.cell {
  display: table-cell;
  padding: 5px;
  border: 1px solid black;
}
  • css-tricks.com/complete-guide-table-element Go to the "Connecting Cells" part. That could help you. – Tristan de Jager Oct 20 '16 at 9:56
  • you can use inline-block as by table-cell they are acting like table.. see here jsfiddle.net/bpyrgsvc/2 – Leo the lion Oct 20 '16 at 9:58
  • Is there a reason for using display:table on div elements? if you want a table-like style - just use the <table> tag for this. This way you can use colspan. – Dekel Oct 20 '16 at 10:01
  • because I am working with React.js in my application , there are some requirements that cause me to use divs instead of table tags – Jim Peeters Oct 20 '16 at 10:04
up vote 2 down vote accepted

With CSS you can build a table using a table element and then style how you want using display: block and inline-block. Though if your need really is as simple as it appears to be then a simple colspan will do the jobs.

<table>
  <tr>
    <td></td>
    <td></td>
    <td></td>
    <td></td>
  </tr>
  <tr>
    <td colspan="4"></td>
  </tr>
</table>

Appending table within the cell should clarify your issue. Refer the snippet below

.table {
  display:table;
   table-layout: fixed;
    width: 100%;
    border-collapse:collapse
}

.row {
  display: table-row;
}
.cell.p0{
  padding:0;
  border:none
}
.cell {
  display: table-cell;
  padding: 5px;
  border: 1px solid black;
}

.cell-full {
  // full width of table
}
<div class="table">
  <div class="row">
    <div class="cell p0">
        <div class="table">
          <div class="row">
              <div class="cell">test</div>
            <div class="cell">test</div>
            <div class="cell">test</div>
            <div class="cell">test</div>
            <div class="cell">test</div>
        </div>
    </div>
   </div>
    
  </div>
  <div class="row">
    <div class="cell cell-full">this changes the width of the cell above</div>
  </div>
</div>

  • This way if you have multiple rows with different content inside your cells - it will not behave like a real table. – Dekel Oct 20 '16 at 10:01
  • Well you just put out that whole div outside of table div. – Leo the lion Oct 20 '16 at 10:02

I don't see anything wrong with the results. In a div set to be displayed as table and table-row, it is behaving as tables.

To get the result you want, close the first table and start another.

<div class="table">
  <div class="row">
    <div class="cell">test</div>
    <div class="cell">test</div>
    <div class="cell">test</div>
    <div class="cell">test</div>
    <div class="cell">test</div>
  </div>
</div>
<div class="table">
  <div class="row">
    <div class="cell cell-full">this changes the width of the cell above</div>
  </div>
</div>

https://jsfiddle.net/bpyrgsvc/4/

Flexbox can do that:

.row {
  display: flex;
}
.cell {
  flex: 1;
  padding: 5px;
  border: 1px solid black;
}
<div class="table">
  <div class="row">
    <div class="cell">test</div>
    <div class="cell">test</div>
    <div class="cell">test</div>
    <div class="cell">test</div>
    <div class="cell">test</div>
  </div>
  <div class="row">
    <div class="cell">this NO LONGER changes the width of the cell above</div>
  </div>
</div>

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