#include<stdio.h>
#include<stdlib.h>
int main()
{
int i,j,k,n,q;
scanf("%d%d%d",&n,&k,&q);
int *m=malloc(5*sizeof(int));
int **a=malloc(20*sizeof(int));
//int a[10][10],m[10];
for(i=0;i<k;i++)
  a[i]=malloc(sizeof(int));
for(i=0;i<n;i++)
   {scanf("%d",&a[0][i]);}
for(i=0;i<q;i++)
   {scanf("%d",&m[i]);}
for(i=0;i<k;i++)
{
   for(j=0;j<n;j++)
   {
       if(j==(n-1)) a[i+1][0]=a[i][j];
            else
        a[i+1][j+1]=a[i][j];
    }

}
for(i=0;i<q;i++)
printf("%d\n",a[k][m[i]]);
return 0;
}

I tried this code in codeblocks but it seems that it doesn't accept any values after I enter the values of m[].
The error is: "matright.exe has stopped working". The input that i entered was : 3 2 3 1 2 3 0 1 2

  • 1
    a[i]=malloc(sizeof(int)); is allocating space for a single int. – Eugene Sh. Oct 20 '16 at 16:36
  • 1
    To help people answer your question, you'll need to be more specific about the error. Please edit your post to incorporate the exact errors you get from compiling your Minimal, Complete, and Verifiable example (preferably using copy+paste to avoid transcription errors). – Toby Speight Oct 20 '16 at 16:42
  • And please provide suitable input, so we can reproduce your results. – Toby Speight Oct 20 '16 at 17:08
up vote 2 down vote accepted

The second malloc

int **a=malloc(20*sizeof(int));

should be

int **a=malloc(20*sizeof(int*));

The third malloc

a[i]=malloc(sizeof(int));

only allocates memory for one element, yet you follow this with a n loop.

Edit (from TobySpeight):

Also, the array lengths have been hard coded. Guessing from the loops further down, you should be allocating:

int *m = malloc(q * sizeof(int));
int **a = malloc(k * sizeof(int*));

with the third one as

a[i] = malloc(n * sizeof(int));
  • 2
    Or even better int **a = malloc(20 * sizeof(*a)); ... – Iharob Al Asimi Oct 20 '16 at 16:38
  • @iharob agreed that would be better style and more maintainable. – Weather Vane Oct 20 '16 at 16:38
  • 2
    Given the loop, then that 20 looks wrong, too: int **a = malloc(k * sizeof *a);. The intention of the rest of the code is so unclear I don't know what to write... – Toby Speight Oct 20 '16 at 17:10
  • @TobySpeight updated the answer, thank you. – Weather Vane Oct 20 '16 at 17:19

I had to modify your program a bit to make it a self-contained example: it was trying to read from stdin. So I replaced the scanf with calls to this function:

int value()
{
    static int n = 0;
    return ++n;
}

and I made n, k and q constants:

    int n = 4;
    int k = 3;
    int q = 5;

Now, I can run Valgrind on it, and the first error is:

Invalid write of size 4  
   at 0x10861D: main (40159824.c:26)  
 Address 0x51d5134 is 0 bytes after a block of size 4 alloc'd  
   at 0x4C2ABAF: malloc (in /usr/lib/valgrind/vgpreload_memcheck-amd64-linux.so)  
   by 0x108609: main (40159824.c:23)

Line 26 is here:

    for (i=0;  i<n;  i++)
        a[0][i] = value();

and it's trying to write beyond the end of memory allocated on line 23:

       a[i] = malloc(sizeof(int));

We only allocated space for one int, but we're trying to write n of them. We should have allocated n times as much space:

       a[i] = malloc(n * sizeof (int));

Similar errors occur when allocating m and a, which are hard-coded to different multiples than q and n which are used as the limits of iteration over them.

After we fix those errors, we get:

Invalid write of size 8
   at 0x108610: main (40159824.c:23)
 Address 0x51d50a8 is 8 bytes inside a block of size 12 alloc'd
   at 0x4C2ABAF: malloc (in /usr/lib/valgrind/vgpreload_memcheck-amd64-linux.so)
   by 0x1085F4: main (40159824.c:19)

We now see that we have allocated

    int **a = malloc(k*sizeof(int));

but a is a pointer to int, so that should have been k*sizeof(int*).

Instead of having to keep the computation synchronized to the declaration of a, we can let the compiler do that, by applying the sizeof operator to *a directly:

    int **a = malloc(k * sizeof *a);

Applying this principle throughout gives is this final program:

#include<stdio.h>
#include<stdlib.h>

int value()
{
    static int n = 0;
    return ++n;
}


int main()
{
    int n = 4;
    int k = 3;
    int q = 5;
    int i,j;

    int *const m = malloc(q * sizeof *m);
    if (!m)
        return EXIT_FAILURE;

    int **const a = malloc(k * sizeof *a);
    if (!a)
        return EXIT_FAILURE;

    for (i=0;  i<k;  i++) {
        a[i] = malloc(n * sizeof *a[i]);
        if (!a[i])
            return EXIT_FAILURE;
    }

    for (i=0;  i<n;  i++)
        a[0][i] = value();

    for (i=0;  i<q;  i++)
        m[i] = value();

    for (i=0;  i<k;  i++) {
        for (j=0;  j<n;  j++) {
            if (j == n-1)
                a[i+1][0]=a[i][j];
            else
                a[i+1][j+1]=a[i][j];
        }

    }

    for (i=0;  i<q;  i++)
        printf("%d\n",a[k][m[i]]);

    return EXIT_SUCCESS;
}

Now you don't get any errors until you reference a[i+1] on the final pass of the loop (when i+1 is k). As I don't know the intent of the code (it's hard to pick it up from your single-letter variable names), I don't know whether a should be larger, the loop should terminate earlier, or something else entirely, so I leave that for you to fix yourself.

There is no code to accept values after accepting values for m[]; the rest of the code is calculation & output.

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